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Thread: Oily coffee

  1. #1
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    Oily coffee

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi everyone! Iím pretty new to this site and to roasting. I recently got a Behmor from CS and started my journey on roasting coffee. One thing I have noticed is that whenever I take coffee to the second crack I get very oily coffee and my Sunbeam EM0480 grinder starts getting very messy and the EM6910 starts dripping out the coffee if it get through. Is there any way to get a CS 9 -10 without getting oily coffee? Is it just the beans? I have found the Brazil Pulped Natural and the Ethiopian Gambella Sundried are most problematic with being very oily and cause much frustration.

    Main questions are:

    1. Do different profiles cause more oils than other profiles or is it the natural process of the bean cooking and sugars breaking down?
    2. Do other people with better quality grinders have issues with oily beans?
    3. Do you find a high variation in grind settings between say a CS8 and a CS10 roast or does it depend on the different sort of bean?

    I have probably roasted about 4Kg since I have had the Behmor and I love it and have had mostly brilliant coffee but Iíd be keen to hear other peoples experience in this.

    Thanks,

    Dan

  2. #2
    enjoy black coffee JamesM's Avatar
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    Have you tried to pull your roast just before 2nd crack? Or immediately at the first sign of 2nd crack? For me in the coretto I get a nice plume of smoke right before 2nd crack, and if I'm roasting for espresso I'll pull it out right there. Might be a little harder in the behmor to get that indicator, are you data logging with it?

  3. #3
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    On face value your oiliness is due to roasting too dark or too quickly, or both.

    The modus operandi needs to suit each different type of bean you wish to roast.

    Grinds settings do vary from type of bean to type of bean, roast style, age, etc.

    Hope that helps.

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    I don't have a Behmor, so some of what follows is heresay.

    First what I know to be fact :- I have been roasting for a while now, in a couple of different poppers. Now it all happens quite fast in a popper, so I have had some roasts that went well into 2nd crack and they were quite oily. As FreshCoffee has said, too fast and/or too dark = Oily. I have been there & done that. I have done roasts that went briefly into rolling second crack, and they were only slightly oily.

    Usually I try to pull the beans quickly at the very first snaps of second crack and cool them as fast as possible. This gives me the darkish roast that I prefer, but with little or no oil on the beans.

    Now to the heresay :- I have been researching roasters, and one thing that constantly shows up in my findings on the Behmor, is that it has a rather slow cooling cycle. Some owners bypass the inbuilt cooling by opening the door and blowing cool air in with a fan, or in one rather extreme case blasting it in with a leaf blower. Others remove the drum and tip the beans into an external cooler (this suggestion sometimes comes with warnings and legal disclaimers). Google "behmor cooling" without the quotes, and you will get lots of hits.

    So my conclusion is that with this unit it could be easy to go past your target roast point; and if you are aiming for a fairly dark roast, you may get one that is a darker (and oilier) than you were aiming for.

    I can't comment on the better grinder question because I don't have a better quality grinder, except to say that my grinder settings seem vary with just about everything known to man, and just when I think I have it right something changes. (Murphy's Law ?)

    Cheers, Leo.

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    Thanks everyone for the responses. I'm starting to think that the issue is in the cooling. I'm not opening the door straight away and the slow cooling might be causing more oil. I'll have a play and see what I come up with. The flavour is still great which is Why I am also questioning the grinder and if other grinders have issues with oily beans.

    One other thing, I have been heating up the roaster to about 100C before I start. Any suggestions on doing this or not? Could this be an issue?

    JamesM: I have been logging the data but I only have it in spreadsheet format. I can do a screen dump but I can't seem to put it into a graph format.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DavidW1960's Avatar
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    Oily coffee

    I recommend the pre-warm for 1:30 which will take it to 100 or so degrees. I also only ever roast 312g which gives me around 250g roasted ( 8*312=2.5kg)

    I roast on 1lb 2 C but I pull the beans before second crack - 2-3 minutes after first crack - any longer and it may hit second - may also roll into second when cooling. I also always cool with the door closed.

  7. #7
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    I get a nice plume of smoke right before 2nd crack
    You get that plume of smoke at second crack... the internal crack lets the CO2 out hence the plume. However... you may HEAR second crack shortly after.

    I pull the beans before second crack - 2-3 minutes after first crack - any longer and it may hit second - may also roll into second when cooling. I also always cool with the door closed.
    Good advice!
    With any roaster you need to allow for the transition from adding heat to taking it away. In my commercial roaster 12kg of 220C beans hit the cooling tray, there is some "over run" where the beans are still cooking until the beans start cooling. In a 120kg roaster with such a big bean mass it would be far longer.

    As David said above, the Behmor is fine for cooling with the door closed, you just have to allow for that extra transition time and cut the heat earlier.

    I have been heating up the roaster to about 100C before I start. Any suggestions on doing this or not?
    I wouldnt.
    Try without the pre-heat and I think you find the roast far more manageable at the end of the roast. Too warm when starting will make the whole profile ramp faster.

    spreadsheet format. I can do a screen dump but I can't seem to put it into a graph format.
    When you hit save in Roast Monitor there are 2 check boxes, one for CSV, one for JPG. Tick both and it will save a graph image and the excel format too.

    Make some adjustments to your roasting style (one at a time), take note of the differences and you will be fine.



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