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Thread: Coffee Beer Recipe Ideas

  1. #1
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    Coffee Beer Recipe Ideas

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Anyone got a good coffee beer recipe?

    I have decided at long last to put 2 things i love together in one glorious glass.

    What could possibly go wrong?

  2. #2
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    I have a bottle of " Double Espresso" .."Premio Caffe Birra" Commercially made by Traditional Scottish Ales Ltd. 6% alcohol.
    Bought locally, but not tried yet !

  3. #3
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    A recepe for espresso stout: Homebrewing: Espresso Stout (INeedCoffee.com)

    I like beer and I like coffee but I will continue to drink them separatly.


    Barry

  4. #4
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Young's Double Chocolate Stout (available in widget cans in Oz) has quite a distinct coffee-ish taste.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Young's Double Chocolate Stout (available in widget cans in Oz) has quite a distinct coffee-ish taste.
    Dont agree with this, your palate must have coffee on the brain, which would be completely understandable since this is a coffee forum. YDCS has a very fake cottees choc topping flavour that's about it. (not having a go at you personally)

    There are plenty of Aussie micros experimenting with adding coffee to porter and stouts. Probably getting into the wrong time of year now, but if you can get to a decent bottle shop that has something along these lines that has been well handled / aged then you could be in for a treat.

    I have a champagne sized bottle from Hunter brewing Co / potters brewery coffee porter that ive been sitting on. I cant remember the quantities, but they used local fresh roasted beans, cold brewed, strained and added straight to the fermenter. From the reading i have done this is the smoothest way to impart the coffee flavour.

    I would suggest finding a stout or porter recipe that you are happy with or preferably brewed before, then start small, for a 23L batch say 150g of beans course grind, cold brewed for around 10hrs in 600ml of water. Strained and added to the fermenter a few days into the primary fermentation.

  6. #6
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    I think i have found something to experiment with,

    A bit on the pricey side for 11.5ltrs but not a bad way to start. I have brewed these before from the malt shovel brewery and are not bad.

    I hope to get my hands on at least one next week.

    Steve, what is the process for cold brewed?

    I have 2 fermenters so i can rack into the second fermenter after the "Krauzen" stage (Is this Right?). is this when i should add the coffee?

    With straining the brew i might use some muslin just to make sure.

    I hope to come up with a breakfast style beer to enjoy with my cereal during summer, but for some reason my wife doesn't understand!!
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  7. #7
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    For the cold brew, coarse grind, 20 - 25g of coffee / 100ml of water, steep for around 10h at ambient in Melb should be fine.

    As i said start at lower end (150g coffee for 23L beer) and see how you like it, adjust next time.

    For cold brew you want to add during active ferment (2-3days in) to account for anything undesirable living in / on the coffee, the active yeast should out compete it.
    To get around this you could bring your cold brew to 65 - 70C and hold it there for 10mins and that should pasteurize it, but i think this would change the flavour profile somewhat.

  8. #8
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info Steve.

    Sounds like you have done this before.

  9. #9
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    Might I suggest to any fellow snobs considering this; go all grain (or at least, a partial mash).

    Canned beer syrup is like instant coffee (best left for VB drinkers).

    The BIAB (brew in a bag) method offers a way into all grain brewing with a minimum of equipment (i.e. your kettle doubles as a mash tun)

    I for one (as someone who's not particularly fond of stouts or rauchbiers) will be keeping these two hobbies separate...
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  10. #10
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    This beer is one that helped Welcome to Surly Brewing Co. to be named the best beer/brewery in the US. It uses what is still one of the best beans I've ever tasted and to make it even better it's brewed via Cold Press/Process.

    Coffee Bender

    Coffee Bender refreshes like an iced-coffee, is aromatic as a bag of whole beans as satisfies like your favorite beer. The Surly brew team has developed a cold extraction process that results in intense coffee aromatics and flavor bringing together two of our favorite beverages. Your only dilemma will be whether to finish your day or start it with a Coffee Bender.
    STYLE: Coffee flavored American Brown Ale
    MALT: Pale Ale, Aromatic, Medium Crystal, Dark Crystal, Oats and Chocolate
    HOPS: Columbus, Willamette
    COFFEE: Guatemalan Finca Vista Hermosa Full City Roast
    YEAST: English Ale
    OG: 14º Plato
    ABV: 5.5% v/v
    COLOR: 45 ºSRM
    IBU: 45


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  11. #11
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    The coffee added to the wort pre-ferment, or in the mash?

    It would be interesting to know if caffeine has any interaction with the yeast.

  12. #12
    Member grantw's Avatar
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    Adding coffee to the mash won't achieve anything in the way of flavour, and the boil will drive off any aroma. I have had success adding espresso during fermentation, I've had good results adding it past high krausen, potential infection issues aside, there's less aroma lost to CO2 production.

    I've got a stout on the go at the moment as was planning to add the coffee when I keg it just to see how it goes.

  13. #13
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    OK,
    I Have found out that the home brew store does not stock malt shovel anymore.

    I have purchased a can of "Mangrove Jacks, Tyneside Brown Ale"

    My Plan is to make 23L, Once past high krausen put 11-12L into a second fermentor and add the coffee (Cold Brewed) through a strainer.
    That way i can compare the two beers and decide if this is a good thing.

    Thank all for the advice, i will let you know how this turns out in a few weeks.

    Grant, keep us posted on how your brew turns out if you add coffee.

    Cheers

  14. #14
    Member grantw's Avatar
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    Well the stout finished up and I racked it to the keg yesterday and added 300gm of espresso (Ethiopian Harrar Longberry). There seemed to be a very pleasant espresso aroma from a quick test pour, and balanced nicely with the dark malts - though I'll give it a few days to carbonate and see how it goes.

    The recipe was as follows

    Batch Size: 22.00 L
    Boil Size: 27.18 L
    Estimated OG: 1.048 SG
    Estimated Color: 27.0 SRM
    Estimated IBU: 30.6 IBU
    Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00 %
    Boil Time: 60 Minutes

    Ingredients:
    ------------
    Amount Item Type % or IBU
    3.60 kg Pale Malt Barrett Burston (3.0 SRM) Grain 78.60 %
    0.45 kg Caramel/Crystal Malt - 80L (80.0 SRM) Grain 9.83 %
    0.22 kg Chocolate Malt (450.0 SRM) Grain 4.80 %
    0.20 kg Wheat Malt (2.0 SRM) Grain 4.37 %
    0.11 kg Roasted Barley (300.0 SRM) Grain 2.40 %
    40.00 gm Styrian Goldings [5.40 %] (60 min) Hops 29.4 IBU
    10.00 gm Styrian Goldings [5.40 %] (5 min) Hops 1.2 IBU
    1.16 items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
    5.81 gm Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 min) Misc
    11.62 gm Gypsum (Calcium Sulfate) (Mash 60.0 min) Misc
    300.00 gm Espresso Coffee (Boil 0.0 min) Misc

  15. #15
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    Cold Brew is on the go now,

    Planning to add 80g of coarse grind yirgacheffe to 11L of ale tomorrow morning,

    **Important Question**
    Can i use a empty Coffeesnobs bag as a strainer?

    I have my Starter pack bag(no zipper!) ready to go.
    If not i will head down to the shops tomorrow.

  16. #16
    Member grantw's Avatar
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    Are we talking into the fermenter? Providing it's sanitised though any fabric will do. Another option is a tea ball - I've a large one that I use for dry hopping.

  17. #17
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    Poured into the coffeesnobs bag, then squeezed into the fermenter,

    i read that the bags are unbleached, so according to the wife that is ok because no chemicals are used in the bag??
    Time will tell, plan to bottle on Sunday and taste in late November.

    Fingers crossed, if no good at least i have 11L of the "no coffee" brew left over and the knowledge of what not to do next time.

  18. #18
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    It has been a grey rainy day in the gong today so it's a perfect reason to have an early taste of the espresso stout. I'm finding it quite good if a little under carbonated.

    There is a distinct coffee aroma on top of the normal roast malt, it's softer and more rounded. Flavour follows the aroma, with a distinct coffee flavour following the darker malt roastiness, no harshness or tannins. I'd call this an improvement over my earlier efforts, not that they were bad, but the coffee has a better spot in the flavour profile and balances well with the other malts. Pretty happy with the outcome. Once it's carbonated I will post a photo of its stouty goodness.

  19. #19
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    I've worked with this before. The most effective thing I've found is what Dave at Dave's Homebrew in North Sydney suggested. He said, if you want to have a coffee taste in your beer, then add proper coffee.

    I did my boil, and then about 2 days into fermentation I added one - or maybe it was two - shots of good espresso. It was in a porter-style beer if memory serves. And it was great. It wasn't overwhelming. I've tried dry-hopping with beans and all that stuff. But this was by far the best method. I've always thought Carlton Black had a distinct coffee taste to it, although I'm not the biggest fan of that particular brew.

  20. #20
    Member themurphs's Avatar
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    Decided to taste the coffee ale yesterday,

    I have to say i was quite surprised how it tasted.
    faint after taste of coffee and sweeter than the brew without coffee added.
    The ale by itself is not a bad drop as well.

    Will wait 2 more weeks for next taste.

    Next time i am going for the espresso shots 2 days into fermentation to compare.

  21. #21
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    I've had a coffee porter before, dont remember the name or where I got it but it was an amazing mix

  22. #22
    Member grantw's Avatar
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    Took a quick photo of my espresso stout, ignore the foam stand I was being lazy. It is delicious nonetheless
    Attached Images Attached Images

  23. #23
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Dredging up an oldie…

    Just done a batch of Morgans Dark Ale, complete with Chocolate Rye grain and Fuggles Hops. Thought I'd try a coffee infused version while at it, so did a small batch of cold steep (230g coffee, about 1L water, 24hrs in fridge then filter through the aeropress) which was delicious on its own. The cold steep has a more cocoa like flavour than cold drip, so used this method which seemed more suitable to a dark beer. Took six bottle of my brew and added about an espresso cup (60ml or so) of the cold brew to each bottle before filling with the beer. We'll see in a few weeks how it goes!

    BTW - home brew question. I've done 8-10 brews now, but have never had any batch get close to the 1005 SG that most recipes say the beer should reach before bottling. Mine all seem to plateau out at 1015-1020 SG after 5 days or so, so I bottle and they've all been fine. Could this be a dud hygrometer? Altitude? Water quality? Just interested really…

    Cheers Matt

  24. #24
    Senior Member yabba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    Dredging up an oldie…

    Just done a batch of Morgans Dark Ale, complete with Chocolate Rye grain and Fuggles Hops. Thought I'd try a coffee infused version while at it, so did a small batch of cold steep (230g coffee, about 1L water, 24hrs in fridge then filter through the aeropress) which was delicious on its own. The cold steep has a more cocoa like flavour than cold drip, so used this method which seemed more suitable to a dark beer. Took six bottle of my brew and added about an espresso cup (60ml or so) of the cold brew to each bottle before filling with the beer. We'll see in a few weeks how it goes!

    BTW - home brew question. I've done 8-10 brews now, but have never had any batch get close to the 1005 SG that most recipes say the beer should reach before bottling. Mine all seem to plateau out at 1015-1020 SG after 5 days or so, so I bottle and they've all been fine. Could this be a dud hygrometer? Altitude? Water quality? Just interested really…

    Cheers Matt
    I'm guessing the hydrometer is fine however the easiest way to check is to put it into the water your brewing with and check for a zero reading (1.000). If its not, whatever it reads at is your "Zero" for future reference. FG is relevant to fermentation however its primarily relevant in comparison to OG (opening Gravity / Starting gravity). I would be measuring both and calculating ABV to be confident you have fermented most / all the "Sugars". You don't want to be bottling beer that has stalled in fermentation as you risk bottle bombs. You probably already know most of this but its worth mentioning the need for temp control depending on yeast type as it will determine the activity of the yeast and if it brews out or stalls not to mention positive flavor vs funky ones. You should be tracking your SG from day 1. While the brew is bubbling you know its brewing. Once you see it stop start measuring the SG again as you want to see a static SG for approx 3 days to be sure fermentation has stopped.
    Just my thoughts. Hope it helps.

    Cheers Yabba
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

  25. #25
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    Are you brewing with malt extract? It's hard to get the SG down low when using extract because the fermentability is locked in during the extract process. So if you're using extract you don't have much control over that and it's common for them to finish around 1020. If you use grains, during the mash process make sure to keep your temps low, around 150F, and that should help.
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  26. #26
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Thanks guys
    I am using a malt extract - a dark liquid malt from memory - previously I've used brew enhancer type dry malts. I do keep the measurements from day one, then log them daily until they plateau for 2-3 days, so if 1020 is a common range for these extracts, then I'm probably on the money. Temps are fairly stable - move the batch around the house depending on time of year to keep it in the low to mid 20's, so hoping the yeasts are fine.
    Haven't tried a grain mash brew, though does sound like fun - maybe one day I'm sure some of those allow for better a better head - the kits always seem a little light on, thought flavoursome.

  27. #27
    Senior Member yabba's Avatar
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    Ideally an ale yeast should be kept around 20 - 22 degree's depending on which yeast you use. Its very easy to manipulate the starting SG with cans of malt extract. Very simply put less water in or boil it down allowing for a higher concentration of sugars after the water has evaporated. You may ask why you would boil it down, well simply if your going to make hop additions effective you will need to time your hop additions depending if you are wanting to bring out bitterness or aroma. So if you are boiling for 60 mins then you will need to allow for evaporation but it also allows for SG to be determined by yourself.

    All grain is a lot of work (relative to malt extract brewing). The next step if I may suggest is to buy non hopped extract (cans or tubs). This gives you a blank "flavor" profile to allow you to determine the hops and yeast which is what develops the flavor, bitterness and aroma when temp controlled. Real hops added over a 60 min boil will give exceptional results when using a good quality yeast such as wyeast without making the big step into all grain brewing. To explain, The kits of malt contain ISO hops which is added for ease. I'd liken it to using a coffee extract when making an iced coffee. Its going to have coffee like flavor but obviously very poor quality. Likewise hops react to heat and time in heat. Long boil = Bitterness. Short boil or added at flame out (Cooling down / not boiling) = aroma. And most importantly is yeast. Yeast imparts the characteristics as fermentation occurs and there are hundreds of types all with differing characteristics. Like coffee, it really comes down to how far along the path you want to go however its all fun regardless.

    Cheers Yabba
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  28. #28
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Not another 'Alice down the Rabbit Hole' hobby!
    I'll need to do some more exploring …
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  29. #29
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    If you want to explore to the next level look into BIAB on a stovetop;
    Easy way to get into AG brewing, It won't set you back $$ and the beer gods will bless you with some fine brews.
    DesigningByCoffee and MrJack like this.

  30. #30
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    Dredging up an oldie…
    Just done a batch of Morgans Dark Ale, complete with Chocolate Rye grain and Fuggles Hops. Thought I'd try a coffee infused version while at it, so did a small batch of cold steep (230g coffee, about 1L water, 24hrs in fridge then filter through the aeropress) which was delicious on its own. The cold steep has a more cocoa like flavour than cold drip, so used this method which seemed more suitable to a dark beer. Took six bottle of my brew and added about an espresso cup (60ml or so) of the cold brew to each bottle before filling with the beer. We'll see in a few weeks how it goes!
    Tried the first bottle of this brew the other day. It was spectacular!

    The stand-alone brew is good - great head, good flavour, nice and dark - maybe with a little more bitterness than I'd normally like in a dark ale. Suspect this is the base ale plus the grain - so might back off the grain next time or go back to a whole chocolate grain rather than the rye I used this time.

    But now to the coffee ale - the sensory experience was amazing! The aroma, sweetness and syruppy mouthfeel that the coffee added was sensational. Settled down the bitterness and made a truly mulit-layered flavour profile. The only drawback was that the coffee oils killed the normlly great head - poured with a thick, brownish head which settled very quickly. No lack of carbonation in the body of the beer - it just couldn't stand up against the floating coffee oils!

    Well worth the experiment

  31. #31
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    If you want less coffee oils in the brew you can filter the coffee through paper or cloth filters, doing so will remove oils. How much will be determined by a variety of variables.


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