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Thread: Opinion sought

  1. #1
    Senior Member csutak40's Avatar
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    Opinion sought

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    As I'm the "coffee snob", a friend of mine asked for my opinion. She is a member of a club who (as I don't wish to give them a free plug) shall remain nameless. They got a letter with and elaborate ad, containing:
    Health Coffee Fund raising Program
    Black coffee Latte Mocha Chocolate Green tea
    Infused with the wonder herb Ganoderma Luciden
    These are Alkaline Coffees (non Acidic) Enjoy the significant benefits

    Personally, I prefer my coffee not to be infused with anything. However, what my friend wants to know, given the fact that she has all sorts of food intolerances, if it would be safe to drink and/or if I have heard of it, and if so what.

    So, I thought, I'd ask here


  2. #2
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    Well a quick google search tells me " herb Ganoderma Luciden " is actually a type of mushroom used for anything and everything in old school Chinese medicine.

    I cant see how they can claim it would make the resulting coffee " alkaline"

    edit: Ganoderma is available in capsules and liquid extracts, both of which can be found at health food stores. You can also take ganoderma in tea or coffee form, but beware that the flavor may be bitter.

    Some people experience dry nose, dry throat, nausea, and gastrointestinal problems (such as nausea) when taking ganoderma. Since the mushroom might interact with certain medications (such as anticoagulants and some chemotherapeutic agents), it's important to tell your physician if you're currently taking or considering the use of ganoderma.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    It's a fancy (scientific, I suppose) way of saying they're mixing in Reishi 'shrooms with the grinds. Searching info on reishis should give her more information about intolerances/etc.

    REISHI MUSHROOM: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings - WebMD

    The fact that they're calling it a herb and saying that their coffee is alkaline shows they don't understand the substance, nor pH, or (presumably, in this context) the fact that acidity in coffee generally refers to flavour, not pH (yeah, I know that there are coffee varieties that are more or less acidic than others, but I'm willing to bet the coffee they're using is marketted as "low-acidity" which would typically refer to flavour).

    Should be safe, but if she's really interested she'd arguably be better off taking powdered Reishi rather than getting an unknown concentration that may or may not be affected by the brewing process, in overpriced coffee.

  4. #4
    Senior Member csutak40's Avatar
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    Thanks very much for the quick replies, I shall pass it on

  5. #5
    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragunov21 View Post
    ...the fact that acidity in coffee generally refers to flavour, not pH (yeah, I know that there are coffee varieties that are more or less acidic than others, but I'm willing to bet the coffee they're using is marketted as "low-acidity" which would typically refer to flavour)."
    Care to elaborate? To my palate, acidity is something that is felt rather than tasted and I am very curious to find out what acidity tastes like.

  6. #6
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    I guess it depends on whether you think you *taste* sour/bitter/sweet/salty, or simply feel it while tasting food through your nose. Apparently about 20% of people have trouble distinguishing sour from bitter which explains why so many here have difficulty diagnosing their shots. I've always thought of sour simply as being acidic (low pH). To me, the inability to tell the difference is as strange a phenomenon as being red-green colour blind
    Vinitasse likes this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    I'm not sure whether there's a direct correlation between a bright or acidic taste/sensation (let's be honest, it's not easy to objectively describe a taste without merely referencing other tastes) and pH because I don't know how taste receptors work, but I was assuming that brightness/acidity (in terms of flavour) was a response to concentrations of compounds rather than pH.

    Acidity (pH) for a given concentration isn't the same for different acids, so I wouldn't have assumed that a coffee that tasted less "acidic" (or bright) was necessarily less acidic (pH) if there are a bunch of different acids contributing to that flavour.

    Unless of course taste receptors respond to pH.

    *EDIT* Apparently perceived sourness is the result of anionic concentration, not pH or hydrogen ion concentration, so it should be as I assumed.



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