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Thread: Wine barrel aged coffee...

  1. #1
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    green beans in a wine cask

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Im getting professionally reconditioned wine casks for a food related project, the casks were used for Merlot in South Australia. the cask is scraped clean on the inside and still has approx 6 bottles of wine trapped in the wood staves (oak).
    I want to store a few kg of green beans in the cask to see if the bean pick-up on the Merlot red wine & oak.
    The barrel/cask moisture is between 9-11%
    Has any one done a similar thing?

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: green beans in a wine cask

    May be worth a try. I tried some barrel aged Colombian a couple of years ago from Single Origin roasters in Sydney that was quite nice. If you search for barrel aged Huila you will find a fair bit of info.

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    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
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    Re: green beans in a wine cask

    Quote Originally Posted by 454F5A4D4D425650230 link=1340694765/1#1 date=1340697582
    I tried some barrel aged Colombian a couple of years ago from Single Origin roasters in Sydney that was quite nice.
    The difference being that the barrels used for storing/ageing coffee are new, clean, not laden with wine, and constantly rotated.

    I guess the concern Id have with the Merlot soaked barrels would be the possibility of contamination with mould, bacteria and fungus. Then again....might end up tasting like some Indos and home roasts Ive had! ;D

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    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Re: green beans in a wine cask

    be great for smoking food with 8-)

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: green beans in a wine cask

    Quote Originally Posted by 5D7C7777706A190 link=1340694765/2#2 date=1340698804
    The difference being that the barrels used for storing/ageing coffee are new, clean, not laden with wine, and constantly rotated.
    Yep, saw that Den. There was kind of an oak quality to the Huila beans, if I remember correctly. In fact, I do. Heres my original post.
    It might also turn out nice and worth a try in my opinion. I think any mould, fungus or bacteria that might contaminate the bean during the aging process would likely be destroyed during roasting.

    According to an article on Sweet Marias site, the Penta method for processing Brazil Daterra beans involves storing the beans in wood silos for a few weeks.

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    Re: green beans in a wine cask

    Thanks for the feedback and link to Huila in Columbia.
    The cask I am using has been fully reconditioned at a cooperage so each stave is scraped clean of wine residue, then lightly re-fired to caramelise the oak. The re-fire also adds spicy tones.

    I still need to select a green bean to use, (Any suggestions)
    I will place 15kg-20kg of green beans into the cask and test regularly to monitor development. (The cask is 225ltr)
    A French trained chef friend who uses similar method with food says the green beans will need at least 2 months before I would detect any infusion.
    I have the cask laying on 2 customised cable rollers in our warehouse so I can give it a rotation each time I walk past.
    I will post images soon

  7. #7
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    Wine barrel aged coffee...

    Coffee beans aged in pinot noir barrels have fruity aromas and earthy richness | OregonLive.com

    I guess it comes down to whether it ultimately adds or detracts...

  8. #8
    Senior Member yabba's Avatar
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    I guess it's the same as the "add or detract" of all people / services / businesses / products in life, it comes down to the individual. What I detest, others like, well until they see reason...I had a laugh

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    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Well, I guess someone had to do it sooner or later....

    Me? I prefer what comes naturally...

    Mal.

  10. #10
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    I guess it comes down to whether it ultimately adds or detracts...
    from the article:

    wine-barrel-aged El Manzano is softer and more rounded, with exotic ripe aromatic notes of guava and durian fruit

    Durian!
    IS SHE SERIOUS?

    If it tasted like Durian the coffee was aged in a thunderbox not a pinot barrel.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    No different to adding nut flavours, vanilla or what ever else to flavour/taint the beans, take yer pick.
    I much prefer my coffee au naturel, when it comes down to it, once again, personal taste.

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    Senior Member Journeyman's Avatar
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    Durian tastes fine, it's the smell that isn't pleasant. If your coffee smelled like durian you'd be reaching (retching?) for the bucket.

    I like my shiraz but I don't think I want my coffee that way. Pinot I like I find only rarely, so I definitely don't want that in my coffee cup.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    Durian tastes fine, it's the smell that isn't pleasant.
    Cant say I agree with this JM, have tried Durian a number of times in SE Asia, smells like sh*t and tastes pretty much the same.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    from the article:




    Durian!
    IS SHE SERIOUS?

    If it tasted like Durian the coffee was aged in a thunderbox not a pinot barrel.
    Bahahahaha! I reckon she's full of it herself.
    It all made sense when I googled the author, of course, she's a wine writer.

    I love a good pinot - just can't afford it - but I would spew if I found the exotic bouquet of ripe durian in my glass of pinot! Perhaps the sort of aroma an over-ripe merlot could produce - pretty sure it wouldn't be a selling point for wine, or coffee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Cant say I agree with this JM, have tried Durian a number of times in SE Asia, smells like sh*t and tastes pretty much the same.
    Ah, I've only had it in the Sawasdee Thai restaurant in Melbourne. I'd heard of the stench so when it was suggested for dessert I was a bit wary but Francis assured me it tasted fine and he was right... so maybe they 'treat' it in some fashion? One time they made an ice cream of it too and that went superbly with their mixed dessert. (which needs to be tasted to be believed - one of them is banana cake - make from glutinous rice gel. Stunning in flavour. )

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Cant say I agree with this JM, have tried Durian a number of times in SE Asia, smells like sh*t and tastes pretty much the same.
    haha, it is very much a love it or hate it kind of fruit!
    me? I LOVE IT!

    sounds interesting nagano, would love to follow a thread on updates/developments if you do go down that route!

  17. #17
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Cant say I agree with this JM, have tried Durian a number of times in SE Asia, smells like sh*t and tastes pretty much the same.
    I have tried durian from Thailand and Indonesia - didn't like the smell, taste or texture. My brother-in-law took me to places in Singapore where they sell grade A Malaysian durians and they were pretty good. Mind you, it I don't know if I'd seek those flavours in coffee.

  18. #18
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Wouldn't roasting get rid of any slight effect the aging in the barrels may have had?



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