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Thread: Advice on barista courses (for home coffee making)

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    Question Advice on barista courses (for home coffee making)

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all,

    I am looking to dramatically upgrade my home coffee making facilities and with the significant expense comes the desire to upgrade my skills on a high quality machine. Is there any good courses people could recommend for a novice in Brisbane?

  2. #2
    Junior Member Emmetsespresso's Avatar
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    I would definately steer clear of government type courses. Maybe check around at some of your Favourite coffee spots. I know a lot of places will do training in their quiet periods and usually don't advertise. You will be looking at anywhere between $50 and $70 for about an hour or so.

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    Member Abhishek's Avatar
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    That's awesome hamishsr!

    I know that Peter from Wolff Roasters runs a course. Also, I've heard good things about thefix Caffeine Consultants (although I've never had any contacts with them).

    Good luck

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    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Welcome to CS hamishsr!

    Beware of any 'course' that only goes for 'an hour or so' or where costs are low.

    Always check student numbers per class, as you don't want to end up with a bunch of people competing for the attention
    of the trainer.
    Doing such a class/workshop for the 'home barista' can be worthwhile, if you go for the jugular and pay for the very best.

    Costs may be as high as $250 for a 3-4 hr class of 4 or 5 participants and higher if you want one on one.

    Some links here: https://www.google.com.au/search?cli...yiFKaN8QeL_4FQ


    Ask questions and enjoy the ride.

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    Junior Member Emmetsespresso's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=chokkidog;520608]Welcome to CS hamishsr!

    Beware of any 'course' that only goes for 'an hour or so' or where costs are low.

    Always check student numbers per class, as you don't want to end up with a bunch of people competing for the attention
    of the trainer.


    That came across wrong. I meant more as a touch up 1 on 1 session to just refine technique. I

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    Member Abhishek's Avatar
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    Great point mentioned above. It's a good idea to find a facility with small class size and more time on machine. There are few busy cafes who run their own courses and generally are heaps better than those government-type 1hr certificate course.

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    TOK
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    Hi there hamishsr.

    I can see you have 2 posts up, havent seen the first one (?).

    Meaning that on face value in this thread, we dont know your background in coffee making.

    Ergo I dont necessarily recommend you do any course at all...yet....as you may already have a good command of using a presumably lower end pump driven machine and reasonable matched grinder, and just wanting to upgrade to better / more expensive equipment.

    If that is the case then I dont know there is much point in doing any course at this point. Its really about "getting out there" and becoming familiar with your new equipment and putting the same principles to work on it as you have already been using on your older equipment. IE...practice practice practice.

    If on the other hand you tell me you have no experience with a pump driven esp machine and grinder, then by all means do a starter course. They really arent "barista" courses in that they dont shall we say...turn anyone into a "barista". They are more shall we say....an "espresso class" at the basic level.

    Depending on the individual, sometimes I dont even recommend that....if you deal with a professional trader who will sell you nice equipment, set it up for you and give you the basics BEFORE you leave the showroom (so you can go home and actually use the machine straight up to make some coffee), I may recommend to people that they go home and use it for a few weeks and come back for a formal espresso class AFTER that when they are actually reasonably familiar with their set up and can better understand course content as it applies to them.

    That way, the same class may actually be of more value to them, the client.

    But of course I'm just being picky, and others have differing opinions.

    I dont really go the whole "lets do an espresso class with the local cafe guys" thing. They know their equipment and the application in the commercial situation. But do they know the application of an espresso class to the miriad of home espresso machines and home machine users in the home use situation?

    Only you and they can answer that question....and would rather see you take it all up with the vendor of your equipment (if they do coffee classes) who has a vested interest in making sure you learn the equipment well and are a happy satisfied client.

    Hope that helps.
    Dragunov21 and Emmetsespresso like this.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abhishek View Post
    Great point mentioned above. It's a good idea to find a facility with small class size and more time on machine. There are few busy cafes who run their own courses and generally are heaps better than those government-type 1hr certificate course.
    Crikey Abi, you've come a long way in a week, from a newby to feeling qualified to offer advice to other newbies seeking help, ever heard the quote "crawl before you walk"
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOK View Post
    ...we dont know your background in coffee making.
    Based on what TOK said it sounds like you would benefit most from a customised session rather than an actual course. As you're in Brisbane, I'd recommend you have chat with Luke from LTD in Fortitude Valley. He does small classes and will be able to teach you at the level you want. You'll also get to play on the Strada....

    Good Luck.

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    Member Abhishek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Crikey Abi, you've come a long way in a week, from a newby to feeling qualified to offer advice to other newbies seeking help, ever heard the quote "crawl before you walk"
    Hahahahaha! You crack me up Yelta I'm trying my best to be involved in the newbie forums only
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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abhishek View Post
    Hahahahaha! You crack me up Yelta I'm trying my best to be involved in the newbie forums only
    As someone else commented Abi, you certainly take criticism very well, or is it that your very good at deflating people who take the micky? either way well done.
    chokkidog and Abhishek like this.

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    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Having located and read your first post, hamishsr, I agree with TOK.

    If you purchase from a good retailer, or better yet a site sponsor, you will receive a training session with your purchase and on the same gear.
    A good, specialist retailer will also help with troubleshooting should you need further help after having the machine for a while.

    If you want to further your skills and experience down the track seek out someone really good, perhaps a latté art class with an
    accomplished, competition level barista?

    Check sponsor list at the bottom of the page.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    Costs may be as high as $250 for a 3-4 hr class of 4 or 5 participants and higher if you want one on one.
    $250 per hour teaching how to make espresso! $312.50 if your lucky enough to have a class of 5, and I thought plumbers were pirates.

  14. #14
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    As I said.......may be......;-D

    It may seem expensive but then classes don't generally run back to back for 40+hrs/week and not all scheduled classes get fully booked (or booked at all).

    Rent overheads for dedicated 'schools' may be high, as are machinery costs; one 'school' that I know of only runs LM's and Roburs.

    And just like with espresso class instructors..........there are plumbers and there are Plumbers. ;-D

    And it's not always beer and skittles...... my daughter recently had the opportunity of participating in a class.

    She was booked in, by her work, for a $200/ 4hr class (maximum of 5 people), she was the only one booked in for the time slot so she
    got value for money and although the instructor finished early ( no distractions from other pupils) they only made <$50/hr.

    However, because my daughter didn't get the full amount of time that was paid for, the instructor booked her in for an advanced class, for no cost. :-)
    So even though advertised prices might seem high, good, professional instructors, with integrity, may not get quite the money you think;-D

    Stick with plumbing Yelta!! :-D :-D :-D

  15. #15
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    As I said.......may be......;-D

    It may seem expensive but then classes don't generally run back to back for 40+hrs/week and not all scheduled classes get fully booked (or booked at all).

    Rent overheads for dedicated 'schools' may be high, as are machinery costs; one 'school' that I know of only runs LM's and Roburs.

    And just like with espresso class instructors..........there are plumbers and there are Plumbers. ;-D

    And it's not always beer and skittles...... my daughter recently had the opportunity of participating in a class.

    She was booked in, by her work, for a $200/ 4hr class (maximum of 5 people), she was the only one booked in for the time slot so she
    got value for money and although the instructor finished early ( no distractions from other pupils) they only made <$50/hr.

    However, because my daughter didn't get the full amount of time that was paid for, the instructor booked her in for an advanced class, for no cost. :-)
    So even though advertised prices might seem high, good, professional instructors, with integrity, may not get quite the money you think;-D

    Stick with plumbing Yelta!! :-D :-D :-D
    Hmmmm, perhaps if prices were more realistic bookings may well pick up.

    As far as running high end equipment, I'd like a dollar for every post from people asking for assistance after doing a course on commercial gear only to find the knowledge was difficult to apply to their Silvia or Sunbeam machine.

    I'm not a plumber, however recently had cause to call one.

  16. #16
    Member MrPug's Avatar
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    Anybody been to attend the "get the most out of your machine" course from Di Bella? $50 for 1 hour, one-on-one. I'm interested in giving it a go but just wondering if any CS'ers had an experience with it. While I'm not exactly looking to become a barista I'd just like to - as the course says - "get the most out of my machine"

  17. #17
    TC
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOK View Post
    Ergo I dont necessarily recommend you do any course at all...yet....as you may already have a good command of using a presumably lower end pump driven machine and reasonable matched grinder, and just wanting to upgrade to better / more expensive equipment.

    If that is the case then I dont know there is much point in doing any course at this point. Its really about "getting out there" and becoming familiar with your new equipment and putting the same principles to work on it as you have already been using on your older equipment. IE...practice practice practice.

    If on the other hand you tell me you have no experience with a pump driven esp machine and grinder, then by all means do a starter course. They really arent "barista" courses in that they dont shall we say...turn anyone into a "barista". They are more shall we say....an "espresso class" at the basic level.

    Depending on the individual, sometimes I don't even recommend that....if you deal with a professional trader who will sell you nice equipment, set it up for you and give you the basics BEFORE you leave the showroom (so you can go home and actually use the machine straight up to make some coffee), I may recommend to people that they go home and use it for a few weeks and come back for a formal espresso class AFTER that when they are actually reasonably familiar with their set up and can better understand course content as it applies to them.

    That way, the same class may actually be of more value to them, the client.
    Strongly agree with that TOK and it's what we do as well.

    When you buy a machine, it's all about the machine, so at that point, we provide online notes and training videos and show the owner how to dose and texture milk. A few weeks later, it can then be about the process and it delivers far superior results.

    I find that 90min is generally more than enough to deliver massive improvements.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    $250 per hour teaching how to make espresso! $312.50 if your lucky enough to have a class of 5, and I thought plumbers were pirates.
    I think Chokki was suggesting $250 per session Yelta.... FWIW, I don't think $100 p/h is unrealistic for 1 on 1 specialist training.

  18. #18
    TOK
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    Yes Chris,

    I understand you mean $110.00 / hr.....includes GST .

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    Cleanskin Coffee just put on their facebook a post about training with a GS/3?

    (not sure if this breaks rules...?)

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    TOK
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    Inaccurate information removed by Mods hamishsr isnt buying one of those so if training is specifically on useage of GS3, then atleast some of it will be wasted.
    Last edited by Javaphile; 15th January 2014 at 09:24 PM. Reason: Removed inaccurate information

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    FWIW, I don't think $100 p/h is unrealistic for 1 on 1 specialist training.
    Nor do I, I thought $250 for a 3 to 4 hr session in a class situation was pretty steep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thebookfreak58 View Post
    Cleanskin Coffee just put on their facebook a post about training with a GS/3?
    In a nutshell, so what?

    So long as an espresso machine is able to make great coffee, training is effectively training. For the machine specific stuff, we have user manuals and grey matter.

    I have gear that pulls better shots than a GS/3, but it'd be a total waste of time to use it for training- until more clients invest in spring lever gear....

  23. #23
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOK View Post
    actually it does
    Eh?

    tenchars

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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    In a nutshell, so what?

    So long as an espresso machine is able to make great coffee, training is effectively training. For the machine specific stuff, we have user manuals and grey matter.

    I have gear that pulls better shots than a GS/3, but it'd be a total waste of time to use it for training- until more clients invest in spring lever gear....
    Oh...so nothing :P

    The OP was asking about machine, and I thought it would be useful to the OP

    I agree, if the machine used is pretty irrelevant for the basics



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