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Thread: The six disruptive innovations of coffee

  1. #1
    Senior Member smokey's Avatar
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    The six disruptive innovations of coffee

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    This was a great read, informative and raised some good points, I am sure you will enjoy it too.

    The six disruptive innovations of coffee | agoodkeensavage

    Some pics:

    zero-defect.jpg

    Zero defects

    100arabica.jpg
    The defects they removed

  2. #2
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Hey Smokey.

    Your pic captions are a little misrepresentative.

    Here are the copied and pasted captions:


    Top pic ... "Zero defect coffee from a single plantation with great inherent flavours."

    Lower pic ... "Defective coffee from the same plantation showing the importance of grading."
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  3. #3
    Senior Member smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    Hey Smokey.

    Your pic captions are a little misrepresentative.

    Here are the copied and pasted captions:


    Top pic ... "Zero defect coffee from a single plantation with great inherent flavours."

    Lower pic ... "Defective coffee from the same plantation showing the importance of grading."
    Thanks, I had some trouble trying to work out how to get them on the page.

  4. #4
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Happy to help, Smokey! :-)

    Just click on the first letter of first word, hold down your shift key, click on the last letter, last word, take finger off shift key.

    When selected text is highlighted, select copy, then paste into new document with active cursor by selecting paste.

    ;-D
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Interesting read.

    One point I will take him up on "In the mid-1980s owners in New Zealand and Australia made their coffee using imported coffee beans shipped over from Italy." by the 1980's Kappys Coffee in Adelaide had already been roasting in and around the Central Market for almost 50 years, I remember them well.

    I know there were other roasters in operation at the time though don't recall the names.

    I'm sure some of the older members can recall other roasters in other Australian states prior to the 1980's.
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    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Pricked my ears too Yelta!

    Genovese started roasting in 1955. Robert Timms since 1951.

    Although there was probably plenty of imported roast prior to the boutique boom a search through various sites show plenty of roasters

    operating here in <1980.

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    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    I've mentioned before that my father had an espresso machine in his cafe in South Grafton in the early 1960s.
    The previous owner had installed it.
    There was a strong Greek connection between Sydney and the mid to north coast of NSW.
    I've researched this previously so quickly found a quote about some early Greeks whose name you may know. Note the year.

    "In 1936 John bought the firm and next year established Andronicus Bros. He and the indefatigable Kathleen ran the business between them. From Arabia, Africa, India, Brazil and New Guinea, they imported coffee beans which they roasted and ground for both the retail and wholesale trades"
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    There were certainly other retail roasters around in the '50's and Harris was most likely roasting for his own coffee shops long before then !..
    In 1883, Edgar Harold Harris, an English tea & coffee merchant, sailed the first Harris Coffee Clipper into Sydney Harbour, bringing with it the finest coffee beans sourced from around the world. He established E. H. Harris & Co. tea and coffee shop in Sydney’s prestigious Strand Arcade suppling premium grade, specialty teas and coffees and establishing a reputation for service and product quality.
    In 1954 Harris began to enter the retail sector, roasting for health food retailers, general grocery stores and for David Jones from the mid 1960s. The importance of broad distribution of the brand led Harris to be a pioneer in the nascent supermarket chains in the late 1950s.

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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    Pricked my ears too Yelta!

    Genovese started roasting in 1955. Robert Timms since 1951.

    Although there was probably plenty of imported roast prior to the boutique boom a search through various sites show plenty of roasters

    operating here in <1980.
    Hi chokkidog

    +1 Robert Timms since 1951. When my family moved to Perth in 1964, they were roasting New Guinea (mainly) at the corner of Geddes & Washington St Vic Park. They had been there for years. Living under a hundred metres away (30 Washington St) and "having" to cycle past them every day on the way to school for a few years was how I first picked up my love of coffee. Dad used to carefully buy it fresh (often warm) and wait for day four before grinding & drinking it in front of us kids (bastard)... One sniff of a freshly roasted / roasting New Guinea and I can still pick it instantly all these years later (salivate).

    Also, Lyndsay (? spelling) did what would now be called "fair trade organic microlot" deals with farmers all over the world before opening what is now called Caffissimo on West Perth in 1975 / 1976. After he retired the whole Bellaroma / Bonissimo / Caffissimo empire was fragmented, however W Pth is still operating the same way: about 15 medium SO's from "way back then" are still available from the same farmers today. For years that was the only decent "boutique roaster" in the west.

    In NSW, my grandfather used to get freshly roasted coffee beans from Andronicus (thx Thundergod, you jogged the name out of my memory banks) from the 40's until the late 70's.

    Back to the article, there are a few other clangers:-

    "The days of scalding hot pavlova cappuccino were over": I wish. Unfortunately the scalded milk thing is very much alive & all too well in most Oz capital cities, and a few regional centres i am familiar with.

    "Iíve always enjoyed the claim in McCafes that each coffee is freshly ground. Itís a good start, but pointless if the coffee being ground is already stale. The freshly ground stale coffee of the fourth stage has a characteristic rancid/burnt rubber aroma." Not going into McD's (once was enough), even when someone is walking down the street carrying one of their horrors, I can smell the dreaded "cheap Robusta aroma". After that, stale is utterly irrelevant. I know there are supposed to be "quality Robusta" beans, I have even sampled some, however the golden arches seems to be avoiding those beans very effectively.

    "Sixth-stage roasters are now seeking out direct trade relationships with growers and working hand-in-hand to improve the quality of the coffee." Just like Lyndsay in the '70's, and probably others in other states...

    "Where sixth stage coffee really shines in pure unadulterated coffee and water. This is best sampled in coffee prepared in coffee syphons, aeropress, filter coffee makers.". I guess he means that brewers make a much better fist of coffee when using better beans... now there is a surprise! Better than a decent grinder (Vario) / espresso machine, I think not.

    Then the "graphs" of uncertain origin. Having access to a medical spectrograph, the "brewed spread" is almost identical to one I have seen two or so years ago in a "naked / VST driven 21%+ extraction" in one of my decidedly "down market" 480 grinder / 6910 espresso machines! Implying a wider flavour spread out of the other methods does not even agree with the text of the article. However the spectrograph actually had a thing called a scale pm both axes.

    I could go on, however enough is enough.

    Luckily, my just finished light Colombian (same as the '70's Lyndsay one) is still an excellent cuppa, whether it is second or sixth wave.

    TampIt



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