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Thread: Our mobile coffee (and pizza) business - advice welcome

  1. #1
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    Our mobile coffee (and pizza) business - advice welcome

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hello snobs,

    We have started a mobile wood fired pizza business, also with coffee attached. We're about qualtiy, world class, naples -ish style pizza and also want our coffee to be as good as we possibly can get it.

    I have basic knowledge on how to make a decent coffee, but no where near the vast knowledge I see on this forum.

    This thread is an invitation for you to point and laugh and say 'you fool' if that means I can become better.

    We bought a second hand (OLD) San Marino double group head machine off ebay and had it shipped from Adelaide. It only has manual switches, no preset buttons. I kind of like that fact. An aquaintance of ours owns a coffee roasting business and espresso bar here and he checked out the machine and replaced a few parts for us to get it going. It works well (oh my! Super fast milk stretching! aaaagh! Love it!). But it is in desperate need of a proper servicing and clean I think. We are awaiting a mobile technician to come back to our region to do this (living out in the sticks does have its down side).

    Having said that (here must come my first bashing from you) we have already begun trading from it. This weekend past we served about 200 cups. We only have one double portafilter so I am going to order a new one today to make things faster. We have been only serving one size cup and that is 355ml (12 ounce). We did a double shot for every cup unless asked for an extra shot or a half strength coffee. If it was up to me I'd only serve one size but smaller, but the western world mainly wants bigger bigger bigger and I don't really want to be bothered with two sizes, especially considering we do pizza also and simpler is better for us at the moment.

    So I need to order a new portafilter, and new double basket. In the past, trying to perfect my technique on our second hand (see a pattern) sunbeam em6910 I read a bit about VST baskets and naked portafilters (to judge the out pouring but also because, you know, they look super hot). Should I go with a cafelat portafilter to have the option of naked or not? And a VST basket? I don't know what brand our baskets are at the moment because my husband bought them off aforementioned coffee roaster. They look decent (to my untrained eye) but certainly the double basket looks to hold less than our double sunbeam basket (which is total rubbish anyway). I will try and weigh later how many grams seem to go in it.

    Should I go with a deeper double basket because those 355ml cups are so big? What would you recommend for size? Obviously I need to get two the same if the one we choose is different to the one we have. Or use different sized cups. I don't know!

    The other thing I'll be bashed about is that we're using our home sunbeam grinder at the moment. EEEEK! After yesterday I am ready to purchase a Mazzer Super Jolly doser (because I need the speed, durability and the reliability of a commercial machine, but also because now after making some profit finally we can afford to buy one... but having said that we won't have a huge event to make loads of coffee for a couple of months so maybe I should put off the purchase to save on interest).

    Alright, sorry for the length. And for the neediness. Thank you kindly for any advice or bashing that will help me do a better job.

  2. #2
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Forget about VST baskets. Find your groove before you make things hard for yourself.

    Standard or Precision filters will be fine while you start up.

    Not all of the 'west' want bigger.... remember, you will generally have a captive market and if they want coffee......

    let them have what you have.

    You are throwing away money by serving such a large coffee as standard. Stick to 8oz ( 240ml) @ $4.00 each, ( <<>> 18 gm coffee shot ),

    it will also make your workflow / productivity faster.

    As the Aussie dollar drops and current stocks of grinders are sold, new shipments will only increase in price but that is up to you.

    Give yourself time to get used to any new equipment before you try it out on the public. A Super Jolly in a high volume environment?

    Wouldn't be my choice but go with what you can afford.

    Good luck!
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    VST baskets - these are hard because why? Is it because you must be very precise every time to get the right result? Sorry if it's a stupid question, I'm keen to learn.

    I was hoping to go with only a small cup and even just one opinion of an outsider (yours) has tipped me over the edge.

    As to the high volume environment... most of the time it will be slow. Maybe 5 times a year probably, 10 at the absolute most if we push ourselves to those events, we will have a day where we are making coffee for hours without much break. Last weekend just happen to be one of them. I don't want to spend any more than $1300 on a grinder if I can help it.

    Thank you, chokkidog, for your reply/advice. It is much appreciated.

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    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    You are very welcome EM!..... not a stupid question!

    Given that over 95% of your output will be milk based coffees the, if any, extra nuances that a VST might, repeat might, bring will be drowned in the milk and lost on

    your clients as well as causing your workflow to slow down to 'weighing each shot pace', both in and out. ( grams coffee in, grams fluid out ). They are also an extra

    expense that you might not want. They aren't cheap and you will need good (+/- 0.1 gm) scales. They have a relatively small window of tolerance for your grind, dose

    and tamp and given that you will be operating outdoors you may find that too many grinder adjustments, with the associated hiccup in workflow, is a pain, resulting in

    frustration for you and loss of client satisfaction/goodwill. If you push on without adjusting the grinder, VST's can give a nasty result in the cup. They are not a panacea.

    As a start up coffee business you should be concentrating on: mastering the consistent base technique of 'grind, dose and tamp'; achieving consistent milk

    texture and temp; establishing a workflow where making good, consistent coffee becomes second nature and lastly but not least, making your clients happy.

    For an event coffee caterer..... K.I.S. ( I'm not going to call you S.!!). Go all scientific if you like, but save it until you're competent with the essentials.
    Last edited by chokkidog; 9th December 2014 at 09:59 PM.
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    Thank you again. That is very sensible and sound advice and the sort of thing I say to people in other areas too. And one which I want to cling to with dear life. I don't want unnecessary fuss. I want most of all to give out a consistent product which is better than average (remember, I live in the country and the average, though better than it ever has been, is still not particularly high around here in my eyes).

    There have been a few times (not in this town... bar once!) when I have tasted coffee that just opened my eyes and hit me smack in the face and I knew for certain, beyond personal taste even, that what I was drinking was amazing quality. I really want to have output like that. REALLY. Which is a stretch considering my inexperience. But it's in my nature to want to produce the best and I have to start somewhere. But I have also often said that I'd rather be consistent at 'good' than be hit and miss ranging from 'great' to 'average' or worse.

    Thank you for not calling me stupid. But I have thick skin so throw those names at me if you think it will result in improvement. Cheers.
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    I'm far from an expert but i think it sounds like you'd be better off finding a really great supplier for beans and develop a good technique with their blend.

    With fantastic beans and consistent technique i think you would be able to produce that amazing quality product you are after without worrying about VST baskets.
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    There is a coffee roaster in town whom we are buying from and he knows his coffee. We're going through all his blends and single origins to determine which one we will settle on for now. We are all about quality (with the pizza as well as the coffee, and every other little thing we sell) but also want to be as local as we can without compromising (too much) on that quality.
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    I am going to get quotes on a grinder and I was set to go with the Mazzer Super Jolly doser until chokkidog questioned it. Was this only because of the assumption that we would be super busy all the time? Do you have another suggestion? Thanks.

  9. #9
    TOK
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    Yes I believe that to be the case.

    A super jolly is just like any other "basic" 64 mm cafe grinder in that when the going gets tough (busy), it will overheat and stop for a while until it cools down, during which time you will lose business. There is a difference between doing 10 kg a week in a cafe spread over a 5 day week (where a 64 mm grinder will be fine), and doing say 5 kilo in a morning at an event (where it wont).

    So even if you are not expecting to do much on average, you only need to get a single job on say a sunday morning at a busy event, and you could be sunk if you have a super jolly type (64 mm) grinder.

    You should consider going the next size up where the grinders have a much greater capacity to deliver volume. They don't look much bigger in a physical sense, but they deliver a LOT more volume than a 64 mm grinder before "failing" (ie overheat and stop for a while).

    That puts you in Macap M7 territory (75 mm) where there are two models the M7 and the M7 Extreme (titanium grinding plates), and the Mazzer Major (83mm). Any "bigger" (in capacity) and you are looking at conical grinders, which have even greater capacity to deliver.

    That said......my son used an Macap MXA (64 mm and equivalent to a super jolly) for some time and I don't think he ever had a problem with capacity...it depends on how you run the show. If you run alone, then you can only go a certain speed and the grinder probably wont get to the point of stopping. If you take a couple of helpers (one to take money, one to help at the machine), then all of a sudden you are running more quickly and that can tip a 64 mm grinder over the edge.

    So there is more to this than meets the eye, and a lot of it is to do with management.

    Hope that helps.
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    Chokki has given you some good advise (as usual). Here's a few things I've learned while operating my cart;
    Get to know your beans and grinder. I see you're working with your roaster which is great, but being outdoors can play havoc with your grid settings (especially when the rain kicks in and the air moisture levels swing). These are only small adjustments to the grinder so something with micrometrical adjustment is best. Mazzers are great (I have a super Jolly at home) but the manual dosers can be messy, when you add in just a whisper of wind you can end up with coffee everywhere (not sure if you're in a marquee or a van). I'd suggesta programmable grind on demand type.
    One size cup is a great idea, and is my preference, but you have to decide where the customers wants ought weigh yours. If you have 2 cup sizes that means balancing your stock for what you think might sell. If you get Detpac brand cups or similar often the lid sizes are different (plus lids come in packs of 100 but the cups come in packs of 40?? go figure) if you have a massive day you can run out of cups or lids on one size..not a deal breaker but frustrating. Understand your costs with the different size cups, I calculated that I make higher sales with 8oz coffees but make higher profits with 12oz. (this was on a per kg of coffee basis, assuming single shots in the 8oz and doubles in the 12oz). Remember also that 8oz is larger than your standard latte/cappuccino so if you fill an 8oz cup to the top you're espresso/milk ratio is out. Understanding this will help with your consistency.
    Another thing to think about is your 'production line' - who's taking the orders and passing that info to the barista? Paper tickets? Writing on lids? Are you putting in the sugar - liquid or granule? Getting these down pat can dramatically speed up your production, keeping your customers happy. But remember, if you're using good fresh coffee, you care about consistency and quality, you work on your barista skills, keep a smile on your face and a friendly persona even in the busiest "I just dropped a whole 2L milk container everywhere" mess then you'll already be better than a lot of coffee vans out there.
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    Interesting comment TOK, I've not heard of the grinders overloading with heat and shutting off - learn something every day! I used a Super Jolly at an event just like you mentioned, my wife taking orders, I was pulling shots and my friend was doing milk. We went through 5kg between 11am and 4pm and the grinder never stopped working. Maybe we were lucky...that would have been a nightmare if it did!

  12. #12
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    A doser grinder on auto fill could conceivably exceed it's duty cycle and shut down if it's a slow grinder and the coffee pumping and the queue long.

    A doserless grinder will always get some 'off duty' cooling time between shots, even when the going is tough.

    The Macap M7 comes in a few variants including an M7K, which is a 68mm conical, so if you were to pitch this against the Mazzer Major-e make sure you get the opportunity to try

    your chosen coffee through both before you buy. The M7 (and Xtreme) is as TOK describes, planar, like the Mazzer.

    There's plenty written online about all the above but nothing beats the hands on stuff.



    Thanks prioring for your kind words.

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    If your business depends on it, i would consider it wise to have a back up grinder of some sort available ( used mazzer mini /compak ?)

  14. #14
    TOK
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    Quote Originally Posted by prloring View Post
    Interesting comment TOK, I've not heard of the grinders overloading with heat and shutting off - learn something every day! I used a Super Jolly at an event just like you mentioned, my wife taking orders, I was pulling shots and my friend was doing milk. We went through 5kg between 11am and 4pm and the grinder never stopped working. Maybe we were lucky...that would have been a nightmare if it did!
    Note grinders with fresh grinding plates will go far longer than when the plates are getting worn. Many operators dont notice because they use the grinder every day, but as plates wear the level of noise from grinding increases significantly. When the plates are worn and not working as efficiently as they should (and screaming), it seems to increase the heat load (friction, whatevr) and they will stop more easily (thermal cutout).

    In terms of management, here is a "budget" plan. If you find a couple of well priced used super jolly's or MXA's or something equivalent in a 64 mm, buy two and that spreads the load (if you can put a grinder each side of the machine) so there shoudnt be a problem. Or....perhaps spend a similar amount of money to buy an M7 or a major or something else equivalent in the size, and then you shoudnt need any form of 'backup". Horses for courses to suit individuals In most cases if the equipment is spec'd properly in the first place and plates or burrs changed out when required, a backup is not required and will sit in the cupboard ad infinitum (I've seen it often enough) . If the equipment is under spec'd, it will need backup. Seemples!

    Or perhaps I should say.....that is my experience. Others may differ.

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    Thank you all so much, I can't express how much I appreciate all this advice and knowledge.

    While my insides are always screaming 'get the best!!!! overkill even!!!!' because I've learned, at last, despite how frugally I try to live, that in the end 'quality' actually saves you money and A LOT of stress... plus the added bonus of good results in the mean time. I simply cannot justify +$2000 for a grinder/s. $1500 is about our limit.

    We can't really fit a grinder each side of the machine. We can at the moment but hope to mount a glass door bar fridge on the bench which will leave only enough space for one grinder. Fridge space is really our limiting factor at the moment. It's a real pain.

    One of the reasons I didn't want a doserless with electronics is because to me simple is better because less can go wrong! And that is particularly the case if buying second hand (with electronics). I bought our dough mixer second hand and I am still yet to date it. It looks like it was made in the 50s and it has been imported from Italy. It's built like a truck. A very heavy truck. And it has just one button. It looks and feels so reliable. And gosh I hope it is because if it fails, I doubt fixing it would be cheap or easy.

    Back on topic, I'm going to have to get quotes and do more research before I decide on a grinder. If anyone else wants to chime in with an opinion I'm all ears. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blend52 View Post
    If your business depends on it, i would consider it wise to have a back up grinder of some sort available ( used mazzer mini /compak ?)
    That's a very good advice, particularly considering the fact that you operate in an area where having your main grinder serviced may take longer then it would in a big town. Even if your main grinder can deal with the quantities required during an event, it can still have an incident at some point. Having a pair of spare burrs may cover some of them but not all.
    So purchasing a cheap but still solid secondhand grinder may keep you going while the main grinder is being serviced. And if you shop around you may get one quite cheap.

    Obviously, you don't need to have two grinders on the bench every day, even if such a setup could be helpful if using two sorts of beans. But having a spare grinder available can be very helpful every now and then.

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    So the other half said our little Sunbeam em480 can be our back-up for now. I am hoping when we get a new grinder I will see a difference in the end product and if I do, I will not be satisfied to have the Sunbeam grinder as our back-up anyway. But in terms of money, I think we'll get the main grinder for now and find a second hand 'something better than the Sunbeam' as back-up when one comes along and the funds have replenished.

    Now, here's another nubish question - if I order a cafelat portafilter (so i can have the option of naked or not) which variation do I need for my old San Marino? I'm sorry, I'm just totally clueless as to the small technical details.

    It would be nice if there was just a little store nearby I could go and buy all of these things and get advice from a knowledgeable salesperson face to face. The trials of the rural life I suppose. But forums are the next best thing and as I've said before I'm so grateful to you all for your help.

  18. #18
    TOK
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    Hello Erin,

    and playing the devil's advocate......sorry but I am getting alarm bells.

    a) you dont need a backup if you spec properly in the first place and
    b) your EM480 will last all of 5 minutes in a back up role and fail, so unless you actually want to wreck the thing, dont use it at all in a commerciaol situation or it wil actually cause you to have to buy another grinder for home and that doesnt make any sense at all./

    Sorry (again), but what do you need a bottomless group handle for? 8oz takeaway cups are already stretching the friendship on a single dose of grinds and anything bigger (which you will have to provide for the masses who will want 12, 14 or 16 oz cups) so you will already be double dosing with a regular group handle and double filter...once yo get to16 oz cups the whiole thing is out of control and outside the limits of regular "espresso".....about the only thing you will gain by using a bottomless is the ability to use the largest possible filter (that wont fit in a group handle with a bottom)....allowing you to use more grinds than is warranted (will the clients know and care) which comes out of your back pocket.

    I understand you want to purvey a quality product and that is a very good thing, but there is no sense going overboard in your scenario. Know your market.

    Oh and regarding a) above, any service provider that wont do an immediate "service while you wait" type of scenario is not worth dealing with. Usually people with vans who do weekend work get their equipment serviced during the week when they are not trading (and in my own workshop are given preference so their stuff is done before the next weekend).

    Know your service provider and manage your business properly.

    Finally, using a San Marino you will be doing an aweful lot of group purging (pull a lot of water out of a portable set up) as these things tend to run inexorably hot. I wouldnt have mentioned this but in view of your mentioning that you would consider (my interpretation) using expensive designer gear such as expensive name brand filters and bottomless group handles, you kind of have the wrong kind of machine to do this if you are looking to maike espresso to the "nth degree" of quality. Throw in (oversize) takeaway cups and a mobile set up and while I understand you want to purvey quality, you have to be realistic with what can actually be done. Yo will make good coffee using the standard equipment if you learn how to use it properly, not necessarily by throwing the tangential stuff into the mix especially first up when you havent even started yet (to learn your equipment) in its standard form so dont have a base line from which to understand the difference that using the tangential stuff will mean (to you).

    Just my opinion, and I hope that helps.

  19. #19
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Hi Erin, I agree with TOK an all points above.

    As far as a naked p/f goes... get one by all means but leave it at home to diagnose and improve your dosing/tamping technique.

    Even in the best environments and the best operators there will be a few wayward jets of coffee from a naked (for a variety of reasons), making a mess of your machine and work area.

    Often, coffee cart operators are strutting their stuff in full public view, keeping everything tidy with a spouted p/f would be a better look.

    As I mentioned earlier, a single dose of 18 gms or so per 8 oz cup, dispensed via double spouted p/f.

    You don't need a backup grinder, the same logic says you should then have a backup cart in case your main one won't start in the morning!! ;-D

    Your grinder budget is pointing you toward the Macap M7D.

    K.I.S.

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    Thank you. Yes, it helps. I know I must sound so stupid when I'm saying we bought a cheap old San Marino and then I'm talking about what basket should I get, vst? What portafilter should I get, cafelat? Etc. I have good intentions (quality product) but little start up capital and not much knowledge of specific component brands and specs etc. Just tell me what to buy within my limit and I'll just do as I'm told.

    I hate to think I can't get amazing coffee because we couldn't afford a better machine, but I'm well aware that this may be the case. Not every goal can be achieved just because you want it badly and try hard to achieve it (well, maybe in the long run it can be). Some things are black and white, regardless of intentions.

    And what do I need a bottomless group handle for? I don't 'need' it but I thought it could be a useful tool in assessing and troubleshooting the espresso shots while we are still 'learning' (please don't get me wrong, I'm not an absolute novice). But also, they're cool. And I like hybrid things, things with multiple uses (edit: talking the cafelat one here, which can be either bottomless or regular). I can use it like a regular portafilter, or a naked, or if the need arises that I need a massive basket, I can use it with that too. But yes, I need to KISS. So I guess I'll just get a regular portafilter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    Hi Erin, I agree with TOK an all points above.

    As far as a naked p/f goes... get one by all means but leave it at home to diagnose and improve your dosing/tamping technique.

    Even in the best environments and the best operators there will be a few wayward jets of coffee from a naked (for a variety of reasons), making a mess of your machine and work area.

    Often, coffee cart operators are strutting their stuff in full public view, keeping everything tidy with a spouted p/f would be a better look.

    As I mentioned earlier, a single dose of 18 gms or so per 8 oz cup, dispensed via double spouted p/f.

    You don't need a backup grinder, the same logic says you should then have a backup cart in case your main one won't start in the morning!! ;-D

    Your grinder budget is pointing you toward the Macap M7D.

    K.I.S.
    Thanks chokkidog, I read this after my last reply.

    Thank you for specific recommendation on grinder. I like specifics.

    Have I missed something totally? 18 grams a single shot? Isn't that a double? Now you've thrown me.

  22. #22
    TOK
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    In regard to the "backup" thing....why have a backup grinder where other than if it is underspecced and having it overheat and stop for 20 minutes, not much else is ever likely to go wrong in real, practical terms (if you bought a quality item to begin with). Much more likely that your coffee machine will need service intervention (thats KoffeePolitikalSpeak for "breakdown") MUCH more often than you would ever have a grinder 'inconvenience".

    Yet very few people ever advise to have a "back up machine".... You would need an aweful big coffee cart to have 2 of everything just in case....

    Re your question "...Have I missed something totally? 18 grams a single shot? Isn't that a double? Now you've thrown me..." The smallest takeway size that anyone will use is the 8 oz which is way bigger than a regular capp cup, and most good cafes will already use the double filter to make the single takeaway ergo roughly 18 to 20 grams depending on the coffee/and group design on the machine....on a cart that will be your staple, so you are already having to double dose everything even when it is only a single cup. That, and the extra milk used in those and the bigger sizes takes an aweful lot out of your back pocket unless you are well covered in your sell prices....

    Erin, if you dont ask you wont know and I can see your heart is in the right place. Trouble is because this is your venture it is emotional, while the rest of us can look in in "bloodless" consultation mode and make practical observations.

    Chokki. You stole my usual line but made it your own by dropping the second S.....KIS.......and I like it

    Hope that helps.
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    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Cheers TOK !! :-D

    Erin, this where you work in with your roaster... forget about 'traditional' ( whatever that means) 7gm single, 14 gm double, 21 gm triple shots.....

    Your roaster will be able to guide you with a dose weight for their coffee in any given coffee/milk ratio; tho' most roasters start to shudder at

    cup sizes over 8oz! ;-). As TOK mentions, 18-20 gms is going to be your zone.... and when you get it right... stand back and take in the compliments

    that will run along the lines of.....'this is serious coffee'. Anything less than this in an 8oz will result in nothing much more than sweet milky something.

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    Thank you both. Yes, I was assuming the standard single shot in an 8 oz cup wasn't going to be strong enough, but I was only questioning the part where you said 'a single dose of 18g per 8 oz cup'. I know what you mean clearly now, it was me being simple I suppose. But you did tell me to keep it simple, after all.

    You guys are inspiring me.

    My roaster is a busy guy (he travels around a lot and is rarely at the espresso bar). I will try and pin him down for a one on one (or two) some time soon.

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    Imo the first option suggested here by TOK is the best if you're on a tight budget AND can shop around a bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by TOK View Post

    In terms of management, here is a "budget" plan. If you find a couple of well priced used super jolly's or MXA's or something equivalent in a 64 mm, buy two and that spreads the load (if you can put a grinder each side of the machine) so there shoudnt be a problem. Or....perhaps spend a similar amount of money to buy an M7 or a major or something else equivalent in the size, and then you shoudnt need any form of 'backup". Horses for courses to suit individuals
    I see a few advices which point out the fact that you cannot have a backup cart, a backup espresso machine and so on. All very true, but since you CAN have a backup grinder even on a tight budget then I say why not? :-) Particularly if the main grinder is a second hand purchase...
    Last edited by AdrianN; 17th December 2014 at 11:16 AM.

  26. #26
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    But why buy two secondhand grinders of lesser quality, unknown provenance and no warranty?

    If the grinder budget is $1500 then a new machine with warranty is a no brainer.
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  27. #27
    TOK
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    There is always plan B which is probably the better way anyway IF you want to serve decaff. I wouldnt complicate matters with any secondary coffee or choice of main coffees, however some may like or want (or not) to offer decaff.

    If so, suggest to fit into the budget (NEW....mad really to go second hand for a business venture):

    M7A (doser / flat plates not conical will work just fine, and a conical will cost a lot more & blow the budget out of the water unnecessarily) for main coffee and
    M2M (or Compak K3) grind on demand for DECAFF

    If you rooly trooly need to have a backup grinder, the decaff grinder will limp along slowly for a little while before it overheats and stops (at truly busy events).

    I prefer macap dosers to mazzer dosers. Its a personal preference. The mazzer has a "faster" action but tends to throw the grinds to the left a lot more aggressively (and over the edge of the group handle) than the macap doser which has a more "damped" action and doesn't throw as far or as much to the left (for me) but will still throw over the edge of the group handle. You have to get used to them whichever way you go.

    Others opinions may differ but that would be how I see it.

  28. #28
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    Hi Erin,
    Your grinder budget is pointing you toward the Macap M7D.
    Hi Erin, I need to point out an error here.... I read off the web page incorrectly and misquoted.

    The Macap MXD ( not M7D) is what I should've typed in... after all; it's what I was looking at!

    Watch this space for confirmation on MXD price...... otherwise the M7A will give you some change.



    Didn't have enough coffee that day.... apologies for the error. :-D
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  29. #29
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    Ahhhh, ok. That makes more sense. I've been wondering for the last couple of days why you recommended that when you knew full well what my budget was. Thanks for the clarification! But now you made me look at the M7D, though totally out of our budget, I want it anyway! Needs and wants, needs and wants. I must remind myself.

  30. #30
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    We recently purchased a Macap MXD Extreme (only got Extreme because they were out of the regular ones). We also got another portafilter for another double basket. We did a small local festival a couple of weeks ago JUST doing coffee, no pizza at all. Having these two new pieces of gear made the whole day a pleasure for me. I get pretty aggro when limited by equipment. At least time wise. The grinder is just great (not that I have a lot of experience in such things). I'm really happy with the purchase. We sold about 310 hot drinks that day (95% coffee) and I was surprised when I realised the number because I had such a good time doing it and didn't feel like it was a drag at all. Maybe it's because making the pizza (which is what we usually do also) is much harder work and days of preparation. Coffee is easy in comparison! And fun! Now we just need to sell another 400 coffees or so to pay off the rest of the grinder and get back to the 'usual' level of debt.

    What feedback we did get from the festival was very good. That's so important to me.

    Thanks to everyone who helped advise and educate me while I considered the purchase of a new grinder. It's very much appreciated.
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  31. #31
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Great to hear ErinMor...

    Mal.



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