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Thread: Good/Bad Cafe or Coffee experiences - Discussion

  1. #1
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    Good/Bad Cafe or Coffee experiences - Discussion

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hello everyone, I'm Cameron as well as a Coffee Trainer.

    As the owner of the business I work with was recently away for a few weeks in Vienna, she was excited to experience a new country and the types of coffee they would make, how they make it over there (if it had it's small differences or not) as well as how it tasted. To her dismay, the majority of the cafe's they had were usually simple 7 Eleven-type push button coffee machines, additionally - she noticed that one cafe in particular only used full cream milk, she asked the barista about it to find that they didn't have skinny, soy, almond or anything else.. only full cream and the one she questioned said that if anyone wanted any other kind of milk he would tell them to go somewhere else. (That's certainly different to how things are here in Melbourne, crazily different, some might say)

    She didn't give up and tried lots of different cafe's to find that they were all relatively similiar, either they were 7 Eleven-type push button coffee machines or what she was served was not what she expected (or asked for).

    So i'd love to know, what have YOUR bad cafe/coffee experiences been like? Have you travelled abroad and tried coffees in other countries too, if so - what was the experience like?
    Last edited by TrainerCam; 3rd June 2018 at 07:16 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCoffeeSchoolBus View Post
    y - she noticed that one cafe in particular only used full cream milk, she asked the barista about it to find that they didn't have skinny, soy, almond or anything else..
    It’s certainly uncommon in places like Vienna and Italy to offer soy or almond milk, and you certainly shouldn’t walk into a place and freak out when it’s not on offer.



    she was served was not what she expected (or asked for).
    When visiting another country it doesn’t hurt to learn a little of their local style and custom.

    For example, many Americans and to a lesser extent Australians go to Italy and ask for Latte. This is an americanisation and it simply means ‘milk’ in Italian. They are then shocked when a glass of milk is served.

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    Quote Originally Posted by herzog View Post
    It’s certainly uncommon in places like Vienna and Italy to offer soy or almond milk, and you certainly shouldn’t walk into a place and freak out when it’s not on offer.
    Oh of course, she didn't freak out or anything, she just found it rather different to what she expected.

    Quote Originally Posted by When visiting another country it doesn’t hurt to learn a little of their local style and custom.

    [COLOR=#333333
    For example, many Americans and to a lesser extent Australians go to Italy and ask for Latte. This is an americanisation and it simply means ‘milk’ in Italian. They are then shocked when a glass of milk is served.[/COLOR]
    Yeah, I can imagine the looks on peoples faces. I personally have had a few different terminology thrown at me while working at cafe's so i've a little experience with it.

    Appreciate the explanation though, it definately helps

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    iif you want a "Vienna Schnitzel" in A. it is different to G. and I., so it is with coffee.

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    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
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    any cafe that doesn’t serve skinny is my hero.
    Andy, Dimal, herzog and 1 others like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolf View Post
    iif you want a "Vienna Schnitzel" in A. it is different to G. and I., so it is with coffee.
    Funnily enough had Vienna Schnitzel for dinner last night :P It wasn't too bad

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    I had one at Figlmuller a few months back

    Delicious and enormous!

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    Asking for skinny milk in Vienna is offensive to their local drink, Vienna coffee is a double shot espresso with cream on top (and not low fat canned cream, heavy double cream whipped or poured).

    You really have to order a Vienna coffee when in that city.

    Europe is full of grind on demand machines, did she try them or just predetermine that they would be bad? I found that coffee from vending machines in most of Europe is mostly pretty good and in front of many Aussie cafes who think that because they have an espresso machine means they are making good coffee. Vending machines are normal there and the coffee is turned over faster than in some small cafes and can be surprisingly reasonable.

    The gotcha in most of Europe (and America too) is that coffee is expected to be very cheap, usually a single coin so without people paying the $5+ they do in Australia the owners need to keep it pretty simple.

    There are pockets of great coffee in every city though, you just need to look harder and some local knowledge helps too. It wouldn't be hard to land in Melbourne, try 10 places and they were all bad or with some knowledge try 10 places that were great.

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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    When I visited New York in 2012 I'd scoped out a few cafes to try out, including Hugh Jackman's establishment which was okay. One place we tried (from memory near the Flatiron building) had this elaborate vacuum-tube delivery system across the ceiling that would deliver a 'dose' of beans from various hoppers along the walls directly into the grinder. It was all very impressive, until we tasted the coffee which was utterly horrible. We weren't in NY for the coffee though, so it didn't ruin the entire trip!

    On my first visit to the UK I did a road trip with a mate who was a bit less particular about coffee than myself. It was always a comical situation when we dropped into service stations - my mate would go to one of the self-serve vending machines, where I'd front up to the counter and pay about a pound extra for a human-made (I will not use the word barista here) coffee, still knowing it will taste just as awful! I just couldn't bear the thought of vending machine coffee...

    Of course I'm aware that my coffee preferences are very Aus/NZ-centric, although I'm aware that our coffee culture has influenced the US & UK somewhat is more recent times. It hasn't all been doom & gloom however - one my my most memorable coffee experiences was when visiting Cologne in Germany on Christmas eve, when I was crook as a dog with a cold and with heavy snowfall outside, we dropped into a cafe opposite the Kölner Dom where I had a 'doppelter' espresso that warmed every corner of my body!



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