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Thread: Oxidation is bad... or good?

  1. #1
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    Oxidation is bad... or good?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Saw this article today (I do note it's sponsored): https://www.perfectdailygrind.com/20...ty-what-to-do/
    It's a bit confusing though, as they've also reviewed Café de L'Ambre in Tokyo, which purposely ages green beans for up to 23 years: https://www.perfectdailygrind.com/20...-for-23-years/
    I'm getting mixed messages here! Preserve your coffee's youth, or enjoy the ageing process for what it is? What do CSers think?

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    Just realised I posted in *roasted* bean storage, and this is about greens... Moderators, please move this if necessary

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Apparently the green coffee at Cafe de l'Ambre is stored in airtight stainless steel containers for aging, so the two are not necessarily contradictory.

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    Oh interesting, I didn't know that. It'd be really interesting if someone ran an experiment to see how the different forms of storage compare. From other threads I've read on here most people seem happy to store their greens in the canvas bags they ship in for at least a year or so without noticeable deterioration. Although it's always a matter of what's the most acceptable storage within your price point, there's a huge variation in price points for everyone - from the occasional dabbler at home through to specialty cafes!
    Has anyone tried storing greens (at home) for a long time, and then roasting them for espresso? How did it turn out? I realise people have said that after at least a year or so the coffee starts to change - I'm curious to know if most people find this to be a general worsening, or if a different flavour profile can be found in beans at a later date (when they're stored without anything particularly fancy).
    Last edited by Spoon; 24th July 2018 at 01:11 PM. Reason: Question was unclear

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    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Looks to have been a fair amount of research on the subject, some of it summarised here: Selmar - Storage of Green Coffee
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    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    Looks to have been a fair amount of research on the subject, some of it summarised here: Selmar - Storage of Green Coffee
    Ah interesting... thanks for posting. Skimmed through and looked at conclusion etc but couldn't find specific timelines (apart from 1> year), could anyone find at what point green beans start to degrade in quality? Otherwise I'll just not skim and have a proper look through haha

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    Senior Member topshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spoon View Post
    Oh interesting, I didn't know that. It'd be really interesting if someone ran an experiment to see how the different forms of storage compare. From other threads I've read on here most people seem happy to store their greens in the canvas bags they ship in for at least a year or so without noticeable deterioration. Although it's always a matter of what's the most acceptable storage within your price point, there's a huge variation in price points for everyone - from the occasional dabbler at home through to specialty cafes!
    Has anyone tried storing greens (at home) for a long time, and then roasting them for espresso? How did it turn out? I realise people have said that after at least a year or so the coffee starts to change - I'm curious to know if most people find this to be a general worsening, or if a different flavour profile can be found in beans at a later date (when they're stored without anything particularly fancy).
    I've roasted beans 8-10 years old for espresso, the flavours were still there and the shots poured the same a "fresh" green beans.
    I store my beans in a cupboard in the garage, so the temperature is fairly consistent as well as humidity.
    The beans don't seem to loose much moisture, if any over a long period of time.
    Dimal, Yelta and Spoon like this.

  8. #8
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Yep, agree...

    That's been my experience too.
    Obviously, fresh is always best with any food/drink product but the 'rules' seem fairly flexible where good quality green beans are concerned.

    Mal.
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