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Thread: What if you just want a great tasting coffee without too much hassle?

  1. #51
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    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    What about the breville bambino?

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    I noticed someone on FB marketplace selling breville coffee machines at reduced prices and she claims that her husband services them and brings them back to working order (thatís why they sell them)
    They look like theyíre brand new. If thatís really the case then thereís a hell of a lot of faulty machines that people are leaving at the repair shop as itís too expensive to fix.
    This doesnít sound right to me, does anyone else think it sounds dodgy?
    I wonder where the machines are coming from...
    Likely extended warranty write offs that are bought back off the warranty company for a pittance then patched up and resold for a profit.

    I have experience dealing with machines from a certain company that sells on ebay. My customers buy the machines as "refurbished" then can suffer an array of problems that I then need to fix up.

    I would not buy a second hand machine from a private seller that has claimed they have refurbished it without proof of work completed and a warranty supplied. Otherwise, buy it at your own risk.
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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erimus View Post
    Also you drink latte's so you need to be able to steam and brew together. The 840 will only do one at a time which will become annoying after a time and then you'll want to upgrade.
    No you donít. And not necessarily. Itís a luxury, not a necessity. The reality is that the OP has clearly stated their budget is $500. A BES920/BCG820 pair is at least $900. So nearly twice their budget. It might be good value, but thatís beside the point if you donít have $900.
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  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    No you don’t. And not necessarily. It’s a luxury, not a necessity. The reality is that the OP has clearly stated their budget is $500. A BES920/BCG820 pair is at least $900. So nearly twice their budget. It might be good value, but that’s beside the point if you don’t have $900.
    It only takes about 20 seconds for the espresso to brew doesn’t it? So I’m happy to wait 20 seconds before I start steaming my milk!
    I just need something that will enable me to get a double shot.

  5. #55
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    It only takes about 20 seconds for the espresso to brew doesnít it? So Iím happy to wait 20 seconds before I start steaming my milk!
    I just need something that will enable me to get a double shot.
    Thereíll be a short wait between finishing the espresso shot and steaming the milk as the heating system needs to raise its temperature higher. On something like a BES840 that time is negligible. By the time youíve poured milk in your jug youíll be ready to go.
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  6. #56
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    There's a BES840 owners thread on CoffeeSnobs which may contain some insights into this machine -

    https://coffeesnobs.com.au/brewing-e...rs-thread.html
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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeLotta View Post
    There's a BES840 owners thread on CoffeeSnobs which may contain some insights into this machine -

    https://coffeesnobs.com.au/brewing-e...rs-thread.html
    Thanks! Just had a quick look. Unfortunately it’s been inactive since 2015 but it looks like it’s a pretty popular machine.
    If I decide on that one, I need to start thinking about a grinder which is something I know absolutely nothing about!

    I’ll suss out the grinders area.

  8. #58
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    Thanks! Just had a quick look. Unfortunately it’s been inactive since 2015 but it looks like it’s a pretty popular machine.
    If I decide on that one, I need to start thinking about a grinder which is something I know absolutely nothing about!

    I’ll suss out the grinders area.
    Page 3 has posts into late 2018.
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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    Thanks! Just had a quick look. Unfortunately itís been inactive since 2015 but it looks like itís a pretty popular machine.
    If I decide on that one, I need to start thinking about a grinder which is something I know absolutely nothing about!

    Iíll suss out the grinders area.
    Breville smart grinder! It seems like the only option on your budget...

    I still think my original suggestion of the BES870 (with grinder) on sale for $500ish was a good idea - just donít leave the beans in the machine all the time...

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    Quote Originally Posted by shauno View Post
    Breville smart grinder! It seems like the only option on your budget...

    I still think my original suggestion of the BES870 (with grinder) on sale for $500ish was a good idea - just don’t leave the beans in the machine all the time...
    But is that grinder good enough? It seems everyone recommends a separate grinder.

  11. #61
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    There have been some great grinder buys in the 4-Sale category lately, worth checking out...

    Mal.
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  12. #62
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    But is that grinder good enough? It seems everyone recommends a separate grinder.
    There are a couple of reasons for this. One is that if you upgrade your coffee machine in future, you have a separate grinder to use with it initially (you'll probably also upgrade the grinder at some point). Also, if the coffee machine goes in for service or repair, you can use your separate grinder with say an aeropress, plunger etc. rather than go through caffeine withdrawal.

    As far as combo units (inbuilt grinder) go, there has been some comment that if you leave beans in the hopper they can get warmed up by the heat from the boiler which doesn't do much for maintaining bean freshness/quality. This would probably be more likely with "appliance" type machines.
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  13. #63
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    I am a big fan of simplicity. (which is why I hate modern cars)
    The more functions you incorporate in one item the greater the chance that something will go wrong impacting on the functionality of the whole machine.
    I prefer to have items that all do only one task and do it well.
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  14. #64
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    I am a big fan of simplicity. (which is why I hate modern cars)
    The more functions you incorporate in one item the greater the chance that something will go wrong impacting on the functionality of the whole machine.
    I prefer to have items that all do only one task and do it well.
    Man after my own heart Rocky.

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    After doing a bit more research I stumbled across the Sunbeam EM6910. What are you opinions on this machine in comparison to the brevilles I’ve mentioned on this thread?
    Obviously I’ll look for a sale.
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  16. #66
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    After doing a bit more research I stumbled across the Sunbeam EM6910. What are you opinions on this machine in comparison to the brevilles I’ve mentioned on this thread?
    Obviously I’ll look for a sale.
    The EM6910 has been superseded by the EM7000 and EM7100. The early Em6910 (pre 2010 I think) were very well regarded. There's quite a lot on CoffeeSnobs about them if you search "Coffeesnobs + EM6910" on Google.

    You'll need to search the EM7000 also but I recall they weren't quite as well regarded in some ways as the early EM6910. Others on here may want to comment more on this.

    The EOFY super deals seem to have largely disappeared. Around 2 weeks ago seemed to be the time the big discounts were around. You may still find some if you're lucky.
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    I'm not sure about your financial situation but I'll talk about it from a financial point of view.
    Assuming you buy 1 cup of coffee per day (which is on the low end since you said you have 2-3 a day) at $4 a cup, you would spend $1460 a year. Let's say the cost per cup if you were to make your own is $1 (20g of coffee at a price of $50/kg), you're still saving $1k a year.
    Now if you use this money you should be able to get a decent machine grinder combo from the sale section of this forum. The beauty of most machines sold here is the resell value, especially 2nd hand, you should be able to get up to 90% of the original price you paid within a few years.
    I was in your situation a few years back, back than I was thinking of getting a breville but ended up with a compak and a lelit. If I had gotten a breville it would most likely have little to no resale value when I upgraded to my current setup but with the compak and lelit I could have gotten 90% of what I paid if I resold it (Gave it to my sister as a gift).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny1123 View Post
    I'm not sure about your financial situation but I'll talk about it from a financial point of view.
    Assuming you buy 1 cup of coffee per day (which is on the low end since you said you have 2-3 a day) at $4 a cup, you would spend $1460 a year. Let's say the cost per cup if you were to make your own is $1 (20g of coffee at a price of $50/kg), you're still saving $1k a year.
    Now if you use this money you should be able to get a decent machine grinder combo from the sale section of this forum. The beauty of most machines sold here is the resell value, especially 2nd hand, you should be able to get up to 90% of the original price you paid within a few years.
    I was in your situation a few years back, back than I was thinking of getting a breville but ended up with a compak and a lelit. If I had gotten a breville it would most likely have little to no resale value when I upgraded to my current setup but with the compak and lelit I could have gotten 90% of what I paid if I resold it (Gave it to my sister as a gift).
    I absolutely know what you mean and I’ve thought about that too.
    In the whole scheme of things a couple of hundred dollars more to spend is not going to change my life.
    If I did decide to spend more I’d still try to keep it under $1k.
    I had a browse online at some Lelit machines. They also only come with a 1 year warranty. There’s a couple of models that are under $1k. I still want something that’s simple to use and I don’t need an engineering/chemistry degree to work out.
    The lelit combi in particular looks appealing. I’ll just do an extra shift! I really want to buy a new machine for my first
    rather than second hand so I’ve got something to fall back on.

  19. #69
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    You should be able to pick up a brand new Sunbeam PU6910 for $500-600. This is a package that includes an EM6910 coffee machine and EM0450 grinder. Itís a very good entry level package that is easy to use and reliable. Itís true that the new 6910s arenít quite as good as the older versions, but theyíre still perfectly ok so I wouldnít worry too much about that. If youíre happy to spend a bit more then you canít go past Lelit for value for money and theyíre now streets ahead of the Silvia or Gaggia Classic.
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  20. #70
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny1123 View Post
    I was in your situation a few years back, back than I was thinking of getting a breville but ended up with a compak and a lelit. If I had gotten a breville it would most likely have little to no resale value when I upgraded to my current setup but with the compak and lelit I could have gotten 90% of what I paid if I resold it (Gave it to my sister as a gift).
    I doubt anyone would pay 90% of the value for equipment that is a few years old and without warranty. Doesn't make any sense.

    This would especially be the case for lower priced gear. $1500 new, $1350 used with no warranty and years of use? Nah.
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    If you buy 2nd hand it is... buy a used Silvia for $350, probably still get $300+ a year or two later...
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    That's about all I would ever pay for a Silvia to be honest...

    Mal.
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  23. #73
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shauno View Post
    If you buy 2nd hand it is... buy a used Silvia for $350, probably still get $300+ a year or two later...
    Depends on luck and who you buy from. Back when I bought a used Silvia, it was advertised in Very Good condition and in full working order. First time I plugged it in and hit the Steam button, it tripped the RCD after less than a minute. Unless you can see it working, (I couldn't, interstate purchase), you're always playing the odds.

    Mine turned out to be an abused heating Element that had minute fractures which opened up at higher temp shorting the element. Fortunately it was from Ebay and paid with PayPal so after opening a claim I got enough money back to cover the new Element but I had to install it.
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  24. #74
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    The Silvia was a good little machine in its day, much better machines available now.
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  25. #75
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    The lelit combi in particular looks appealing. I’ll just do an extra shift! I really want to buy a new machine for my first
    rather than second hand so I’ve got something to fall back on.
    Being EOFY with 2 days to go, why not use the CoffeeSnobs quote form and see if any Site Sponsors can do a cracker deal for you on the Lelit Combi (model PL042TEMD)? You never know you might find a price which suits.

    Quote form link (also at bottom of page) - https://coffeesnobs.com.au/forms.php?do=form&fid=1
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  26. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    After doing a bit more research I stumbled across the Sunbeam EM6910. What are you opinions on this machine in comparison to the brevilles Iíve mentioned on this thread?
    Obviously Iíll look for a sale.
    G'day Carmen

    I already posted about the 6910 on this thread
    https://coffeesnobs.com.au/general-c...tml#post654631
    "Probably the SB6910 / 7000 or the Brevilles - anything that can take a standard 58mm basket - usually about $200. They are fairly light on power, fast(er) to warm up and will deliver what you want in a cuppa for a (hopefully long) while. Also they are pretty easy to master. Once again, by the time it dies you will be able to make a much more informed choice due to the increased options available (and possibly cheaper as well)."

    Buying a new one would have been over your budget so I didn't recommend it. However LeroyC posted about a brand new Sunbeam PU6910 for $500-600 which would also be a good starting point. Be aware that the 450's vary (so do Smartgrinders for that matter) so the grinder could be anywhere from equalling the average Smartgrinder to being pretty useless. The SB480 / 500 is just a better version of the same mechanics (as are some of the lower Brevilles and their Smartgrinder).

    Back to the 6910s: I still have 2 "pre 2010" 6910's which are outstanding for the price - oh and, of course, they "shoot and froth at the same time". I bought one new (Aug 2008 build, about $800 including grinder) and have bought a number of secondhand ones for friends over the years - including my second one here (made in 2006 or 2007: too many other 6910s to remember, or care). The later 6910s are about level with the Brevilles in terms of build quality and shot power. The SB 7000 is quieter and has an auto froth steaming wand which means it is easy to make good microfoam, just about impossible to make great microfoam, and using one will never improve your frothing technique for any other espresso machine (just like using a Miss S will never allow your coffee making skills to transfer to the "real stuff"). For your style of coffee, I doubt you will get much better in the cuppa than a 6910 until you go into a manual lever (Cremina's are roughly $3K) - and with all the faffing around that requires it is not currently a practical option for you anyway.

    BTW, Those guys that reckon a two stage process to do the shot and then the milk must like watching their crema dissipate in front of their eyes. Or else they prefer milk froth that has mostly settled out before the coffee is ready. I have posted a few times on CS that more than 5 seconds between the shot and the milk combining I regard as a utter fail. FYI, time is uber critical in the type of coffee you prefer and, in particular, dark roast crema does not hang around long.

    Ironically, my current setup is a back to the past (hopefully) temporary thing. I have three Mahlkoenig Varios (about $800 each nowadays) for my coffee grinders (different roasts), my secondhand 6910 as a milk frother and a Decent DE1 (about $3K+) which (boo hiss) will not shoot and froth at the same time - hence a similar setup as a Miss S (frother) + manual lever Electra (later a LM GS3) for the coffee from way back when. Unless you change your coffee preferences a lot, the DE1 is not really suitable for you either (complete overkill). IMO machines like the Lelit, ECM et al are no better in the cuppa than my 6910, their reliability is often overrated (find me a 13 year old one that still works and I can probably find you half a dozen younger dead ones at my preferred repairer) and the Electra manual lever spoilt me for anything less than the DE1. YMMV.


    TampIt
    PS: I am already in the market for a DE2 (or whatever) that will shoot and froth at the same time. I had forgotten how much I hated having to use 2 machines for a cuppa when I bought the DE1 last Feb. Mind you, the IMO DE1 remains the only easy to use machine that can match a manual lever... you pays your money...
    PS2: You are lucky via location. Using Perth tap water will show any machine to its grave pretty quickly. Ditto failing to maintain any espresso machine. 9 atmosphere's pressure at 92 Celsius is already pretty destructive unless looked after properly. 6910s only need minimal maintenance, however keeping it clean is essential if you want it to last.
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  27. #77
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    I bought the BES870 for $627.
    I’m satisfied with my purchase and I’m sure it will be fine for the next couple of years at least.

    I’m about to do the unimaginable and buy supermarket beans so I can have a bit of a practice. It’s not likely that on a Sunday at 4pm I can go to a proper roaster and buy beans!
    I’m going to order beans online tonight after I research.

    Thanks for all the advice!
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    Your research should include the green bean->roasting option. Simple math, if you make say 4 cups a day with 18g each that's about 2.2kg per month, say 25kg a year. Good roasted coffee costs about $35 per kg so that's $875 a year in beans. Green beans are about $12.50 per kg so that's $312. You can pay off a $500 roaster in one year. At two cups a day it takes two years to pay off. Obviously one or two other things need to fall in place: You need a handy place to roast. I do it outside, a garage would be better then I wouldn't have to carry the roaster outside every two weeks. If you're in a unit with no access to outside or garage then it might not work. Some people roast inside but neither I nor my wife would put up with the smoke even with the Behmor so-called 'smoke free' afterburner. And you need to get into roasting at least enough to get an idea of how to roast. Not too tricky but not everyone's cuppa. So to speak.

    If you find one or two people interested in taking roasted beans off your hands (as I did) then you can easily end up with them paying for your beans. As long as you are happy to spend an extra hour or two on your roasting day. The benefit to them is that they don't have to research where to buy beans, attempt to source them fresh enough, they get a steady stream of new varieties. And I charge them full commercial rates: Any less and I wouldn't bother given how much of my time it takes with only a 400g roaster. I charge $11 per 250g, ie $44 per four 250g bags. More if they want Yemeni beans of course. Not remotely commercially viable to scale up, but worth it to me as I'm already doing it as a hobby.
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    I wouldn’t let the fact you start work early and don’t have a lot of time to waste deter you!
    I am obsessed with espresso and the art of espresso making and didn’t want to give this up, so i did the following;

    1. Setup a Wifi Power Plug to turn on coffee machine at 6:15am (Profitec Pro 700 in my case) - i allow 30-40mins pre-heat time with portafilter in group head to preheat
    2. Walk past machine whilst getting dressed and disburse water to warm up cup - this takes 10 secs
    3. Get ready for work and before walking out the door (at 7-7:15am) grind/weigh a shot (Mahlkonig Vario) - this takes 30secs inc tamp
    4. Pull my shot (double ristretto), clean group head with brush and flush clean water into nearby container - this takes 1 min
    5. Coffee machine automatically turns off after 1 hour (setup on the Wifi Power Plug)

    From the moment I start to grind the coffee to being finished with the machine is literally only a few minutes, 3-4mins and its so worth it over a pod machine trust me.

    I’ve found the key to this routine is to have everything near by and ready to go. I used to make Lattes in the mornings also, if that was the case simply add another 1-2 mins onto the total time for steaming milk. It was still under 5 mins total time and i do this sometimes still to this day.

    For me i realised that I enjoy the process so much i may as well just get up 5-10mins earlier in the mornings so i can still do this.

    Good luck, my second crack.
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  30. #80
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    I’m about to do the unimaginable and buy supermarket beans so I can have a bit of a practice.
    Not a bad idea to start with cheaper beans until you get the feel of things. Of the Supermarket beans, Aldi's Lazzio Single origin or Medium Roast are some of the better ones but it can be a bit of hit or miss. The bags have a Use By date in small black lettering higher up on the side of the bag. Work back 15 months (!) and you'll get an idea of how old they are. For instance if the date on the bag was "use by 23/9/2020", the roast date was around 23/6/2019. Today's date is 5/7/2019, so beans would be almost 2 weeks old if bought today. Normally you'll see older bags of beans on the shelf mixed in which are well past their best.

    Once you're up to speed, you'll be able to reap the benefits of the more expensive fresh roasted beans.
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 1 Week Ago at 09:29 AM.
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  31. #81
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Pick a medium roast rather than a espresso roast, and not those oily ashy blackened Vittoria.. or Lavazza... I got some pretty fresh grinders beans the other week. Not bad, but still a bit dark for me

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    I bought Aldi Lazzio which smells amazing. I made a couple of coffee from it that tastes better than some of the grey dishwater Iíve been served.
    But the shots arenít consistent. Most of the time, on the indicator thing (not sure if name) the arrow is way above what it should be. Despite this, done coffees have still tasted good.
    I wouldnít be buying this coffee all the time but itís ok in between the preferred coffee beans.

    How many bags bags do you think Iíll have to waste until itís consistent??

  33. #83
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    Are you weighing the ground coffee you're putting into the basket? My guess would be the inconsistency you're seeing is due to the inconsistencies in the grind timer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by level3ninja View Post
    Are you weighing the ground coffee you're putting into the basket? My guess would be the inconsistency you're seeing is due to the inconsistencies in the grind timer.
    No I’ll admit that I’m not weighing it. I’m trying to find my scales. I don’t know if I want to be weighing the coffee at every cup I make.
    I’ll start weighing it as soon as I find the sales.

  35. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    But the shots aren’t consistent. Most of the time, on the indicator thing (not sure if name) the arrow is way above what it should be.
    Could be slightly too fine a grind or a bit too large a dose. Try to adjust one of these at a time to see if the gauge shows in the correct pressure range and it tastes OK.

    One handy tool for dosing if you don't want to weigh each time is the 3 piece set Scottie Callaghan dosing tools. A set came with my Rancilio Silvia a few years back and I still use them with my current set-up for quick dosing adjustment. Also works to distribute grinds evenly when rotated around the basket.

    Site Sponsor Di Batolli has the 3 piece set on special for $19.75 currently -

    https://dibartoli.com.au/scottie-cal...ional-barista/

    3 pc Dosing tool.jpg

    There are sets with more pieces (select) but the 3 piece is made of better plastic and quite useful as is.

    P.S. I believe your machine has 54mm filter baskets which hold a bit less coffee than the more common 58mm on the more expensive machines. When you see weights for dosing quoted, they will generally be for 58mm baskets.
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 1 Week Ago at 11:41 AM. Reason: added image and P.S. comment
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  36. #86
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    The only consistency you're going to get using stale coffee beans is a mediocre cup of coffee. It's quite wrong to recommend stale supermarket beans to practice with.

  37. #87
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erimus View Post
    The only consistency you're going to get using stale coffee beans is a mediocre cup of coffee. It's quite wrong to recommend stale supermarket beans to practice with.
    If you check dates, you can on occasion find beans 2 weeks old. I bought a bag recently and they're fine. 5 week old on the other hand are past it. Gushing $45+ kilo coffee through or burning it while learning the ropes is a waste. At least 1 or 2 bags of the (fresher) cheapies should help get over the initial experimentation.
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 1 Week Ago at 06:05 PM.
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  38. #88
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    I found my scales!
    Should I aim for 16-18g?

  39. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    I found my scales!
    Should I aim for 16-18g?
    As you're using 54mm filter baskets and not the more common 58mm, 15g seems to be the right starting point for the single walled double shot basket.

    If it flows through too fast, grind finer until the pressure gauge is in the correct zone.

    You may have seen this but might be of interest - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0O484KEC4Y
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  40. #90
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    In the videos I’ve watched about this machine I see them just piling the coffee in and there seems to be quite a lot so I assumed what I was doing was also correct.

    I’ll make another one later at 15g.

  41. #91
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    I agree with buying good quality fresh roasted beans and changing one variable at a time.

    I really struggle with the idea that it takes kilos of beans to calibrate everything and dial your shots in.

    Stale beans just don't help anything

    Cheers
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  42. #92
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    15 grams is to far to low and will give you a gusher. All 870's vary slightly so the optimum dose lies between 16 to 18 grams. With my machine it was 18 grams with a setting of never lower than 6 for the grind. I would start at 17 grams and then aim for 25/30 seconds pour and the sweet spot on the gauge is around 1 0' clock.

  43. #93
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    My sample size is relatively small, but in my experience 870s struggle to grind fine enough and overdose to compensate. I could get something drinkable by upping the dose but that basket couldn't take more than 16g and get a proper extraction with the beans I was using. I have heard similar things from other people.
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  44. #94
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    In the videos I’ve watched about this machine I see them just piling the coffee in and there seems to be quite a lot so I assumed what I was doing was also correct.

    I’ll make another one later at 15g.
    No harm in experimenting with slightly different weights. If you were happy with the results you were getting before, grind the same amount, tamp it and lock it into the grouphead then remove it. There shouldn't be an imprint of the shower screen in the coffee. If there is, lower you're weight slightly and try again. You'll see people refer to the 5 cent test which is basically placing a 5 cent piece on top of your coffee puck after tamping and then locking the portafilter in and removing. Raise or lower the dose until you find the coffee weight that is just at the point below the 5 cent leaving an imprint. Adjust your grind until you get the flow right. That's a good reference point to work from. A lower dose might need a finer grind and a larger dose maybe a little coarser.

  45. #95
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by level3ninja View Post
    My sample size is relatively small, but in my experience 870s struggle to grind fine enough and overdose to compensate. I could get something drinkable by upping the dose but that basket couldn't take more than 16g and get a proper extraction with the beans I was using. I have heard similar things from other people.
    Is that overdosing to the point of contacting the Shower Screen?

    If the in-built grinder has a characteristic of running out of fine adjustment, then fresh roasted beans are obviously the only way to go rather than playing the supermarket lottery of maybe finding 2 week old bags.
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 1 Week Ago at 05:51 PM.

  46. #96
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    I don't remember checking, just remember running out of grind adjustment before the shot had slowed down sufficiently. I was using my regular fresh roasted beans at the time, though other people I was using to were almost certainly using Aldi beans

  47. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by level3ninja View Post
    I don't remember checking, just remember running out of grind adjustment before the shot had slowed down sufficiently. I was using my regular fresh roasted beans at the time, though other people I was using to were almost certainly using Aldi beans
    Looks like some people play around with shims on the in-built grinder similar to The Smart Grinder when they run out of adjustment?

    https://www.home-barista.com/espress...od-t31866.html

  48. #98
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    I recalibrated the gears finer on a friend's 870 and got good results. Didn't realise I had reinvented the wheel so to speak when I posted instructions a month or two ago. Pretty much identical method to the CS one linked at the top of that HB thread.
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  49. #99
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    I am curious about the "weighing the grind" thing.
    I have never weighed a dose - never seen the need.
    My Diadema Perfetta is a pretty unsophisticated machine and I found it easy to work out the correct repeatable dose within the first half a dozen baskets I put through it.
    Likewise I used CS beans right from day one. I couldn't imagine needing to put a kilo of beans through the machine to work out grind/dose/ tamp.
    You quickly get to know how much grind it takes un-compressed to be the right amount after tamp. I just eye-check the post-tamp level and adjust it if it is a tiny bit off.
    I couldn't imaging weighing doses. It takes me long enough to get through the process as it is.
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  50. #100
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Using a consistent dose weight of beans is an easily repeatable way of fine tuning a recipe. Weighing is arguably the best way to ensure a consistent dose weight, but it's not the only one. Dosing by volume can be very consistent but the volume of a given weight changes with the grind setting. It could be said that if you understand intuitively that to fix under our over extraction when the shot looked good visually and timewise by moving grind setting and volume in opposite directions then you'll be able to get by just fine without weighing.

    I think where weighing really helps is in two areas: 1. Starting out when you find it hardest to be consistent in a few areas (e.g. distribution and tamping etc) so ruling out weight as a variable can be quite helpful. 2. When you're chasing the perfect extraction. For the 80% in between these it's less critical

    Some people weigh every shot before they pull it, others set it up with scales then use something else day to day (a timer, volume, etc) for speed and ease.
    Last edited by level3ninja; 1 Week Ago at 09:04 PM.
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