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Thread: Any suggestion on where to look for beans please?

  1. #1
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    Any suggestion on where to look for beans please?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    So I bit the bullet and bought the Breville BES870 today.

    I was initially going to buy some supermarket beans just to practice with but changed my mind when I was there as mostly everything was already ground and I doubt theyíd be fresh.

    What are some places in Melb that I could order brands from whether online or in store?
    Iíve googled and some places that have come up are Dukes, Code Black, St Ali & Aucuba. Has anyone bought from these places?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    This should be your first pot of call.


    https://beanbay.coffeesnobs.com.au/V...to-freight-now
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  3. #3
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    If you did want something right now, cheap to practice with Aldi is pretty much the only chance of being fresh enough to use. Buy a bag of the medium blend with the furthest away expiry date and they'll be freshest. They're not great but they're cheap and might be fresh.

    If you want to order online look no further than the very website you're on: https://beanbay.coffeesnobs.com.au/
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Right here Carmen, CoffeeSnobs are in Geelong, however I suspect will reach you just as fast as ordering from Melb, Andy and co are very prompt when it comes to filling orders and shipping.

    Enjoy your new machine.
    https://beanbay.coffeesnobs.com.au/V...rprise-me-rtfn
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  5. #5
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    I’m wondering how long 250g or 500g would last just for one person if I have between 1-2 (sometimes 3) espressos per day?
    And how long do they need to be used by?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    Iím wondering how long 250g or 500g would last just for one person if I have between 1-2 (sometimes 3) espressos per day?
    And how long do they need to be used by?
    Depends how strong you make your coffee Carmen, I use 18 grams of beans per shot, 500 divided x 18 grams = 27.7 divided x 3 per day = 9 days, no problems with freshness there, I find fresh beans will be OK for about a month if stored in non return valve bags in a cool place.

    Hope this helps.

    PS You can buy storage bags from BeanBay if you order from Andy.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Depends how strong you make your coffee Carmen, I use 18 grams of beans per shot, 500 divided x 18 grams = 27.7 divided x 3 per day = 9 days, no problems with freshness there, I find fresh beans will be OK for about a month if stored in non return valve bags in a cool place.

    Hope this helps.

    PS You can buy storage bags from BeanBay if you order from Andy.
    Oh do I need to store them in a different bag too? I thought I could put it in a container!

    How do you weigh your coffee beans? Sorry if that sounds ignorant! Do you do it for every cup?

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    Are we allowed to recommend or say positive things about non-sponsor coffees on this site? I thought we weren’t?

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    Also, Carmen, you should specify the flavour profile you are after. Otherwise, no sympathy if you are recommended and buy very good coffee that is simply a genre that you don’t like.

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    Actually, we’re also missing the obvious - on your other thread, you said there are cafes you go to where you like a lot of their coffees, but they make errors and make some badly. You also said that you didn’t believe that any of the bad coffees there would be due to bad beans/roasting. So you should start by buying whatever that is, since you are familiar with it and think it can produce coffee you will enjoy. That way, you will have a frame Of reference for what to aim for: you can compare your coffees against theirs. If you buy unfamiliar coffees, you won’t know if the cups you don’t like are because you did something wrong or because the beans aren’t capable of delivering the flavour you want. Also, best to minimise the number of variables when you are starting out. Time and weigh your shots. If you can’t make shots within a few ml and a few seconds of each other, you should work on your consistency before trying different coffees because, again, otherwise you won’t know whether the different results you are getting are due to changed coffee or variable technique.

    Good luck.
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  11. #11
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    I really enjoy the beans from Allpress Espresso in Collingwood, Melb.
    Like has been mentioned, removing variables, I've been able to get consistently good coffees from my home machine over the past year with the same type of beans from Allpress.

  12. #12
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmen00 View Post
    Oh do I need to store them in a different bag too? I thought I could put it in a container!

    How do you weigh your coffee beans? Sorry if that sounds ignorant! Do you do it for every cup?
    Store them in the bags they come in. The bags have a one-way valve built in. Put the bags in a cool dark place to make the coffee last the longest, 14įC or thereabouts is best (so a cupboard not the fridge). Some people roll up the bags and put them inside another container to further stabilise the temperature etc but if you're getting through them in 3-4 weeks you'll have no problems.

    You with coffee beans with a scale. Needs to be at least 0.1g accurate. I say accurate but as long as it's consistent the accuracy doesn't matter so much. They don't have to be scales specifically made for coffee (though you can spend $300 on a set if you really want to). If you search for 401762936887 you'll find an affordable starting point. And yes you need a consistent dose (amount of ground coffee) every time. Depending on your grinder you may not have to weigh every time, some have she's built in, some have electronic timers that are accurate enough to give you the same weight every time once set up with a scale. Your 870 has a timer built in but it's pretty average. I would suggest using a scale to set it up at very least. Aim for a 16.0g dose in the double (non-pressurised/single wall) basket. Once you've set it up use a scale to check how consistent it is, you might be ok with the built in timer.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luca View Post
    Are we allowed to recommend or say positive things about non-sponsor coffees on this site? I thought we weren’t?
    There's nothing wrong with saying 'I've enjoyed the beans from this place' etc, but you can't link to their website. Obviously, if it turns into an advertising campaign the mods would pull the plug first, ask questions later.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    From Day 1, I have wrapped my CS bean in it's original clipseal bag, in a towel and stored it in the bottom of the fridge.
    A 500g bag lasts me around 7 weeks (coffee a day) with no discernible degradation in quality. They are certainly not stale.
    Some folks will tell you they are stale after 4 weeks (some folks also tell me you can't cellar wine successfully in Central Queensland because it is too hot)
    Both work for me and I'm not the easiest-to-please man on the planet.

  15. #15
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Unless you live in the tropics or maybe somewhere else hot and humid like Brisbane donít store your coffee in your kitchen fridge. 4deg is the wrong temperature to store coffee at and the constant opening and closing leads to temperature and humidity variations that will age it faster. If you have a wine fridge that is perfect as it can be set to that 10-12deg level and it doesnít get opened as often. Otherwise the coolest cupboard in your kitchen is best. Note that this isnít always the pantry. For anyone in hot humid climes, just do what ya gotta do.
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  16. #16
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    4deg is the wrong temperature to store coffee
    Why is this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    From Day 1, I have wrapped my CS bean in it's original clipseal bag, in a towel and stored it in the bottom of the fridge.
    A 500g bag lasts me around 7 weeks (coffee a day) with no discernible degradation in quality. They are certainly not stale.
    Some folks will tell you they are stale after 4 weeks (some folks also tell me you can't cellar wine successfully in Central Queensland because it is too hot)
    Both work for me and I'm not the easiest-to-please man on the planet.
    G'day Rocky

    Ditto when I lived in Proserpine - a lot of 80%+ humidity and 30+ degree days destroys beans in a cupboard there within a week and I didn't have access to a wine fridge - so normal refrigerator it had to be. Worked best when I used a collapsible bag and minimised the introduction of any "new air", and 8 weeks was easy to achieve even for medium dark roasts. Even better was storing the grinder in with the beans and only bringing it out briefly to play.

    Stale - I wish I could trash that hoary chestnut, however even 6 years on CS has been an abject failure in my efforts to dispel it. Here I go again - the old "beans are best between 4 and 11 days" thing. Dark roasts / more soluble beans usually are fine as early as day 2 and then often need pallbearers by day 11. Medium roasts / less soluble beans often do not even come onstream* by day 11, and are often good well after the three month point. Light roasts take even longer to develop (see below).

    A dire situation - I used to bring a few kilos of "WA air bed roasted" light and medium roast beans to Sydney every trip for my coffee fiends / clients. One time my client had left the coffee beans I had just brought over at his work, so we were "all out" at his beachhouse next wintry morning. Rummaging in the "environmentally controlled conditions" of his wine cellar / basement produced about 150g of a high altitude, lightly roasted (i.e. very dense, low solubility bean) Colombian which had been stored (and forgotten) from a previous trip two or three summers back (i.e. the last time I stayed there). Desperate measures - using his Major and Strada and grinding it a lot finer than usual produced a cup of coffee so rich it was like a good liquor - almost no crema may have been the only downside, however neither of us missed it. That remains one of the best cuppas I have ever had. The age - it was either 18 months or 30 months old! It reminded my of a 1958 Royal Oporto (aged port) in terms of quality. I suspect that no other environment could keep roasted beans drinkable for that long, and no dark roast could have survived more than a month or so anyway.

    So called "3rd wave cafes" please take note: if it still smells green and you insist on using it anyway, please call it "wheatgrass" or "lemongrass" or "sour" or some other more accurate descriptor than coffee. You have given the whole industry a bad rep.

    onstream*: I have never come across any roast that is not at its best immediately after it stops smelling green. It then slowly deteriorates, with light roasts taking the longest to reach their final use by date. Naturally, the longer it takes to stop smelling green, the less crema - so "chocolate bomb / crema aficionados" tend prefer darker, newer roasts. One friend of mine even prefers his cuppa straight out of the roaster... far too undeveloped for me to drink & enjoy - different strokes... Others (like me) prefer to have balanced cuppa which display more regional characteristics - lighter and medium roasts which generate minimal crema (however the crema is very persistent).


    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Unless you live in the tropics or maybe somewhere else hot and humid like Brisbane donít store your coffee in your kitchen fridge. 4deg is the wrong temperature to store coffee at and the constant opening and closing leads to temperature and humidity variations that will age it faster. If you have a wine fridge that is perfect as it can be set to that 10-12deg level and it doesnít get opened as often. Otherwise the coolest cupboard in your kitchen is best. Note that this isnít always the pantry. For anyone in hot humid climes, just do what ya gotta do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    Why is this?
    G'day Lyrebird

    LeroyC told you - every time you open the bag you get temp and humidity changes in the beans. Temperatures over 30 Celsius and high humidity are true bean killers. I suppose having a full sized coolroom and opening the bag inside it may help. The other issue - I prefer to keep the grinder's hopper fairly full as the weight of the beans actually drives the feed mechanism of most grinders - so after a couple of months in Central north Qld I kept my grinder in the fridge with the beans in the hopper.

    Hope this helps


    TampIt
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  18. #18
    Site Sponsor Leaf_Bean_Machine's Avatar
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    The roasters that you mentioned above are all ones that I would recommend in Melbourne. Supporting local roasters is so important as you are also supporting Australian families and their livelihood. I would also suggest looking online as it is nice to experiment with other roasters from around the country, including coffeesnobs. With a 20g dose you would get roughly 12 double shots from a 250g bag and with any food product fresh is best. We recommend with the coffee that we roast (Karvan Coffee) that it is at its best 7 to 14 days after it is roasted and is best consumed within a month. Everyone has a different opinion though and it is really up to you, your tastebuds and the flavour that you enjoy. Coffee won't go off but the flavour loses vitality. Hope that helps. I have also included the link to a blog regarding coffee recipe for you
    https://www.leafbeanmachine.com.au/espresso-recipe/

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    So called "3rd wave cafes" please take note: if it still smells green and you insist on using it anyway, please call it "wheatgrass" or "lemongrass" or "sour" or some other more accurate descriptor than coffee. You have given the whole industry a bad rep.
    I had a laugh; OK, I'll do the flipside of this ... so called "specialty coffee "roasteries"" (including those of you that don't actually roast, but still insist on putting "roastery" in your name), if it smells like black pepper, roast beef, smoke or ash and you insist on using it anyway, please call it "bitter" or "charred" or "burnt" or some other more accurate descriptor than coffee. You have given the whole industry a bad rep.

    Now we need someone to have a go at not over-roasted, but baked, and then another person to have a go at green defects being passed off as specialty grade and we'll have covered 99% of the common causes of bad commercially roasted coffee in Australia ... and probably 97% of commercial coffee roasters, too!

    ... then I'll go by a lawn, stand on it and shake my fist at passing clouds.
    Dimal, TampIt, level3ninja and 2 others like this.

  20. #20
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    My benchmark is Mocopan Pasquale.

    I can't explain why, but when asked I describe it as the most Italian tasting espresso blend.

    I wasted a lot of money trying to find what I like, turns out I'm not in the in crowd.



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