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Thread: Grinder to go with a Rocket Evoluzione Giotto v2

  1. #1
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    Grinder to go with a Rocket Evoluzione Giotto v2

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Can anyone help me with an appropriate grinder to go with a Rocket Evoluzione Giotto v2 - both in style and functionality.
    I am after a grinder with basic features but good quality. It does not need to do large volumes.

  2. #2
    Senior Member coffeechris's Avatar
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    A price guide on what you are willing to spend may help. For around $500 you can get a Compak K3 Touch or push. Depending on where you are from to may help with who you can speak too. You can email all site sponsors in one email by looking at the bottom of the site through there quote form.
    All the best

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    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Hard to go past the K3 for the price point. Need a budget to work to if you have more $$$$$$

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    You don't give a budget so:
    For the quality of the Evo you could avoid upgradeitis and go for a Mazzer Kony e! You would need to allow for a "running in" period for the cones as it is a commercial model, but after that there really is no better. It is cheaper than the Evo - but not much! See various posts about the Kony-e.

  5. #5
    GMG
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    The Anfim "Best" grinder is frequently paired with the Giotto. They're much less expensive than a Mazzer. I had one, but opted for a Mazzer Mini as the stepless setting gave me more control. Depending on what the budget allows, worth considering.

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    Coffee Nut fg1972's Avatar
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    I've got an Anfim Best, had it approx 8 years & now on its 2nd set of burrs, still going strong & is a good match with my Giotto.
    Its recently been modified to stepless for finer control cause lets just say I'm a bit fussy but works perfectly well stock.

  7. #7
    TC
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    Hello ozgazau and welcome.

    An open ended question can only be answered with open ended responses.

    I agree with the others. Start the bidding at Compak K3P and if your numbers have recently come up, you might stop the bidding at something like a Robur-E.

    In between, there are many great grinders, all at different price points.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozgazau View Post
    Can anyone help me with an appropriate grinder to go with a Rocket Evoluzione Giotto v2 - both in style and functionality.
    I am after a grinder with basic features but good quality. It does not need to do large volumes.
    Welcome to CS

    Honestly, as Chris has said in another way, line up a bunch of grinders, shoot an arrow, see which grinder it hits, & take one of the others!

    Seriously and staying strictly within the limits of your question:
    Your machine has a highly polished stainless steel body;
    Your machine is a small end commercial OR a high end domestic. Depends on which way you want to look at it, but given it has probably been bought for home use, we can view it as going into a domestic setting.

    An appropriate grinder then, needs to be well matched for the type of machine in terms of
    performance (to be able to cater for normal home use and occasional dinner parties and gatherings),
    size, and
    looks (no point having a grinder that looks out of place next to the machine or that doesnt match the look of the machine.

    Thats about it.

    You need to articulate a budget because otherwise as already stated, there are a bunch of grinders.......

    My advice then, wrt your "style....functionality...basic features.....good quality....does not need to do large volumes...", is:

    A good quality Italian made grinder with chromed or polished aluminium body (or a total contrast to the polished metal look which may suit the machine and also your kitchen colour scheme....black.....fire engine red....white.....whatever)....sometimes a contrasting colour will look great;
    I choose "Italian made" because to my thinking they have a much better standard of finish than the Spanish offerings and I am sure others will differ.....
    Either a doser OR an on demand grinder you will have to pick what you think may suit you but in terms of your "basic" perhaps a doser grinder;
    Starting from a Macap M4 (because I tnink they are cosmetically nicer than a Mazzer Mini but again that is up to the individual).
    OR for a grinder with a larger and more imposing looking body, a Macap MXA, where you decrease the size of the bean hopper to a smaller more approprate size for home use....(its only cosmetic, the MXA wont do any more for the quality of your coffee than the M4 but it will cost more, and for me it simply makes the total grinder package look better next to the semi commercial size machine).
    You can go the other way and option a Macap M2 which is a smaller bodied grinder that costs less, and it will still do the job really well.

    Either of those will absolutely NAIL IT for your home use (in terms of helping you to make great coffee). You can spend much more money and buy bigger and "better" (open to opinions) grinders for the mines bigger and better than yours brigade, but you have to be ok to spend the extra money and be interested enough in coffee to go looking fior the differences (in the brewed coffee) that may be found in a "bigger / better" grinder (if you run two grinders side by side to make the comparisons....otherwise?). This depends largely on the individual, and some people just want coffee as in they dont embrace it as a special interest hobby.

    Essentially what you are looking for, is a semi commercial grinder to match your semi commercial machine. Anything more (bigger / better / whatever) than that really is only budgetary and academic because if you cannot make great coffee with one of the better semi commericals (M2, M4, MM as above) then the fault does not lie with the choice of grinder.

    Hope that helps.
    Attilio
    very first CS site sponsor

    PS:
    Be aware, that it is common enough for people to cause themselves a great deal of angst when at first trying to choose "the right" equipment for themselves, worried about making the "right" decision or infact, of making the "wrong" decision......and after they make the decision and buy the equipment, many of them never ever think about it again. Its a grinder, it does the job, and the rest is up to the operator.

    Also, I mentioned a chrome bodied grinder to match the machine. Note that unless you keep it scrupulously clean it will easily get to look bad with dust, grinds, fingerprints and kitchen grease coming to rest on your prized posession. Some individuals are ok to have a standard commercial coloured (silver) grinder sitting next to a stainless bodied machine, and the silver colour is much more forgiving. As stated up to the individual.

    ***My company can help you with Macap and Compak grinders and if you wish to pursue this with us, please make the contact off forum***

    EDIT: any comments I made above regarding "bigger / better" and any differences in the coffee that anyone may find (between brewing the same coffee one one grinder VS another) , assume that the person doing the adjudication ("cupping") is drinking black coffee. If your thing is milk coffee then as far as I am concerned the "bigger / better" thing is dead in the water and you will be wasting money to option anything more than a good semi commercial grinder for your needs, where bigger will only give you the capacity to deliver more coffees and nothing more, but you are in a home use situation where that is not required and semi commercial grinders are already way more capacity than you will ever need unless you decide to go into catering......
    Last edited by Fresh_Coffee; 26th September 2012 at 08:43 AM. Reason: Afterthought...why else?

  9. #9
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    What Attilio said plus I would aim for one of the mainstream grinders as it is easier to get parts for them and more likely to have others here who can help with any questions. Mazzer and Macap are the two leading brands but there are plenty of Compak fans among users here; the rest is about budget and aesthetics.

    You mention basic features and low volumes but these requirements can change so don't sell yourself short. If possible, go for a notch above what your target might be; it may be better to find you have a grinder in excess of what you currently need rather than one you find sooner or later doesn't meet your needs.

  10. #10
    Coffee+carbon=heaven Mono's Avatar
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    I vote for the Macap M4D, both visually and operationally. I have mine paired with a VBM junior. The chrome & polished stainless work well together and the machine[s] heights also complement each other. I plan to upgrade the Junior soon but the Macap will be staying as I don't want a 3 foot tall conical :-)

    Steve

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    Another vote for the Macap MD4. I've just upgraded from a Macap M5 to an MD4 after approx 3 yrs of use with an earlier model Giotto. Both grinders are suitable however the MD4 is a bit cleaner, quicker and easier to use.

  12. #12
    Coffee+carbon=heaven Mono's Avatar
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    I can now say that I will be pairing my M4D with my Evo that I will pick up in the next fortnight or so.

    Steve

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    I personally used to get royally frustrated with macap M5s at work. Used to get stuck with a perfect grind that fell between notches. The variability of a gusher and a near block was too close. And that stood true for all 3 of the grinders that we had so it wasn't luck of the draw. I wouldn't get anything that isn't notchless.

    That's my second crack.

  14. #14
    TC
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    Quote Originally Posted by mompt View Post
    I personally used to get royally frustrated with macap M5s at work. Used to get stuck with a perfect grind that fell between notches. The variability of a gusher and a near block was too close. And that stood true for all 3 of the grinders that we had so it wasn't luck of the draw. I wouldn't get anything that isn't notchless.

    That's my second crack.
    Hello mompt,

    FYI the overwhelming majority of M4 and M5 (and D variants) in Australia have a micrometric worm drive for adjustment.

  15. #15
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    Nevertheless:

    Originally Posted by mompt
    "...I personally used to get royally frustrated with macap M5s at work. Used to get stuck with a perfect grind that fell between notches. The variability of a gusher and a near block was too close. And that stood true for all 3 of the grinders that we had so it wasn't luck of the draw. I wouldn't get anything that isn't notchless..."

    There is no other way to say this but...that is wrong.

    A good tradesman doesnt blame his tools especially when they are bloody good ones.

    The pour does not go *from a gusher to a near block* with one step on a stepped Macap M5/4, the grind does not *fall between the notches*, except where the operator has not understood the proper principles of equipment and technique management in making espresso.

    Learn to vary operator technique ever so slightly to cater to the variability in all things coffee. It's "best practice" used by professional coffee people the world over, to determine how to get the best out of their beans and equipment, as conditions change. The grinder setting is no different to any of the other variables involved in coffee making in terms of learning to deal with it, and a stepped setting can in fact be said to be easier & quicker to deal with than a stepless arrangement because you always know the start and end point of your adjustment.

    In terms of good name / brand / model commercial equipment, all of this remains one of the biggest furphies ever perpetrated on the world wide web, and good name stepped commercial grinders cannot be compared / lumped with domestic or low end stepped grinders in terms of their being.....stepped.



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