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Thread: Why are grinders so big!!??

  1. #1
    Senior Member Arcade's Avatar
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    Why are grinders so big!!??

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I'm in the market for a new grinder, currently using a Hario Skerton.

    My biggest gripe is the enormous size of all the electric machines on offer. Half of them seem larger than my espresso machine! I'm just wondering why they need to be this size? I understand in a commercial application the need for solid weight and a large hopper size, but not for domestic use.

    My dream grinder is a Versalab M3 but it's way over budget for me. I'd just be happy with a hopper-less (ie just with a small bean chute) doserless machine but it seems that the Versalab is about the only option. Hence I'm also considering an HG One if I can find the coin....

    Any other suggestions or reasons to go bigger?

  2. #2
    TC
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    You might consider the Anfim/ECA KS. Unlike some of the other small ones/appliances, the coffee pathway post hopper is a plastic free zone.
    Arcade likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Also the Eureka Mignon isn't huge (I'm considering getting one as my 2nd grinder)....just depends what you call 'big' I guess.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Arcade's Avatar
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    Ah both excellent suggestions, thank you. Also considering a Pharos, just thinking it would be nice to have the speed of an electric. Hmmm.

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    I think that part of the reason they are so large is to isolate heat from the motor from the area where the grinding occurs.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcade View Post
    I'm in the market for a new grinder, currently using a Hario Skerton.

    My biggest gripe is the enormous size of all the electric machines on offer. Half of them seem larger than my espresso machine! I'm just wondering why they need to be this size? I understand in a commercial application the need for solid weight and a large hopper size, but not for domestic use.

    My dream grinder is a Versalab M3 but it's way over budget for me. I'd just be happy with a hopper-less (ie just with a small bean chute) doserless machine but it seems that the Versalab is about the only option. Hence I'm also considering an HG One if I can find the coin....

    Any other suggestions or reasons to go bigger?
    Hi Arcade

    I am on my second swiss made ($650 to $700) Mahlkonig Vario (marketed as a Baratza in the US): First one was a "gen1" which I passed on at the "flawless 5Kg / 3 week mark" at cost to a coffee fiend / "friend in need" going to remote N/W mining site. Murphy's law: his own grinder broke on a Sunday night just before his flight out. To my surprise the replacement turned out to be a gen2. It is actually a better grinder than the "gen1" in the sense that a few minor niggles had been sorted.

    Good points: small, quiet (SWMBO friendly), surprisingly heavy (doesn't move on the bench), fast, numerous easy to vary settings for fine tuning (1 to 11 macro, a to w micro), really quick to clean, minimal grind retention and no mess when going direct into the p/f. Brilliant espresso grinder in terms of consistent particle size. Adjustment within the espresso range is outstanding: fast and almost instant. Espresso grind range is from 1 to 3 macro, about 75 micro settings to play with. The grounds come out surprisingly cool to the touch, which is impressive given it's speed.

    Worst points: no on/off switch in / behind the p/f holder for single handed operation. Probably its main fault. The p/f holder is barely OK if you use a naked p/f (only a bit better than the gen1). Also, it must be running to adjust the grind finer: IMHO that is a quirk rather than a fault given the mechanism. It takes about 15g (i.e. a double basket) to go from espresso to plunger and back. Not a particularly good plunger grinder anyway with the ceramic burrs. There is a steel burr option (one third of the life span of the ceramic ones) for coarser grinds.

    I also have a "big beast commercial conical" and the Vario wins hands down until you need to do coffee for a multitude. That may actually be a breakeven, as I have "only" done 40 coffees in just under two hours w the Vario: it coped well, and amazingly the grounds were still coming out cool. Any signs of distress and I had the big beast ready to take over active duty. Busy cafes: use the "big beast commercial conical", that is what they are designed to do.

    Enjoy your cuppa


    TampIt



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