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Thread: Mahlkönig Vario - Coffee is flowing too fast!

  1. #1
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    Mahlkönig Vario - Coffee is flowing too fast!

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hey guys,

    I've had the Vario grinder for a year and it's been really good. However, recently I'm have some problems. The coffee is coming out really fast now at around 5-10 seconds (it used to be 25). I haven't really changed anything. I'm not someone who weighs my coffee or anything and still consider myself a novice.

    I generally just grind for 6 seconds, tap the portafilter, then 3 more seconds and a final 3 seconds for a double shot. My tamp it usually very light as my grind has been very fine 1 and H on the Vario. Perhaps this should be made a little more coarser? This method is probably really wrong and if someone could give me some tips on what I should do to improve my dosage that would be great!

    But why is the coffee flowing so fast from my machine now? I keep it clean and after every coffee always flush the system through. The machine is a VBM Domobar Junior and I'm using Genovese Coffee beans. Could the beans be old?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Arcade's Avatar
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    Strange that it should change suddenly. FYI mine is only a few days old but I settled on 2 for the macro setting, and M-P range on the micro setting. I dose 10.5s for a double basket. Beans 7-14 days age range. Obviously all our settings will vary depending on bean choice, where we are (climate) and taste preference, but maybe try that and see how you go. I use about a 28sec time on the shot.

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    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Hi Anthony
    It's always a bit of a dance
    Could be old beans, new beans, different crop, different blend, change in humidity… even with commercial beans
    Part of the process to making good coffee is just making small adjustments to the grind to suit the flow rate. I'd keep your 'technique' the same (otherwise you end up changing multiple variables) - and just fine up the grind a fraction to slow things down.
    Shouldn't be the VBM - nice machine
    Matt

  4. #4
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Matt is spot on, changing only one variable at a time makes pin pointing problems a whole lot easier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonypiccolo View Post
    Hey guys,

    I've had the Vario grinder for a year and it's been really good. However, recently I'm have some problems. The coffee is coming out really fast now at around 5-10 seconds (it used to be 25). I haven't really changed anything. I'm not someone who weighs my coffee or anything and still consider myself a novice.

    I generally just grind for 6 seconds, tap the portafilter, then 3 more seconds and a final 3 seconds for a double shot. My tamp it usually very light as my grind has been very fine 1 and H on the Vario. Perhaps this should be made a little more coarser? This method is probably really wrong and if someone could give me some tips on what I should do to improve my dosage that would be great!

    But why is the coffee flowing so fast from my machine now? I keep it clean and after every coffee always flush the system through. The machine is a VBM Domobar Junior and I'm using Genovese Coffee beans. Could the beans be old?

    Thanks!
    Hi anthonypiccolo

    I am assuming it is a "gen1" not the gen2. My gen1 needed a clean out every batch of 250g. My gen2 takes a lot longer (I usually clean it out every 250 anyway, although it is not really needed). If it is left for too long between cleans, a full chamber would certainly affect the grind towards coarser.

    If you haven't already done so, I suggest your empty your Vario, take off the top burr and give it a good clean out. Dry compressed air circa 40psi or gentle brushing both work fine.

    Until it is cleaned and potentially recalibrated (gen1 has the tool to do it, read the manual) I would not bother looking too far past the grinder.

    FWIW, I use VST baskets which require a finer grind than standard and use around 1 macro C to E micro. FYI, your 1 H sounds a little fine for a standard basket (1 Q is about correct) and too coarse for VST's.

    Hope this helps


    TampIt

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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    Hi anthonypiccolo

    I am assuming it is a "gen1" not the gen2. My gen1 needed a clean out every batch of 250g. My gen2 takes a lot longer (I usually clean it out every 250 anyway, although it is not really needed). If it is left for too long between cleans, a full chamber would certainly affect the grind towards coarser.

    If you haven't already done so, I suggest your empty your Vario, take off the top burr and give it a good clean out. Dry compressed air circa 40psi or gentle brushing both work fine.

    Until it is cleaned and potentially recalibrated (gen1 has the tool to do it, read the manual) I would not bother looking too far past the grinder.

    FWIW, I use VST baskets which require a finer grind than standard and use around 1 macro C to E micro. FYI, your 1 H sounds a little fine for a standard basket (1 Q is about correct) and too coarse for VST's.

    Hope this helps


    TampIt
    How do I know if it's gen1 or gen2? I have only cleaned out the Vario once.

    I should probably avoid the automatic cleaning with that Grindz stuff though right? So I should just clean the discs with a brush and then wash the hopper where the ebans sit as it could have residue?

    I guess this could be the reason for the very fast flow. Hopefully it isn't damaged as I have not been frequent with cleaning.

    Also, I only wash the baskets for the portafilter and the portafilter itself with water. Should I be using any detergents or anything like that? For the Vario, it says wash the hopper, lid and ground coffee container in warm soapy water so I'm just wondering if the same should apply for the portafilter and baskets.
    Last edited by anthonypiccolo; 13th January 2014 at 01:32 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonypiccolo View Post
    How do I know if it's gen1 or gen2? I have only cleaned out the Vario once.

    I should probably avoid the automatic cleaning with that Grindz stuff though right? So I should just clean the discs with a brush and then wash the hopper where the ebans sit as it could have residue?

    I guess this could be the reason for the very fast flow. Hopefully it isn't damaged as I have not been frequent with cleaning.

    Also, I only wash the baskets for the portafilter and the portafilter itself with water. Should I be using any detergents or anything like that? For the Vario, it says wash the hopper, lid and ground coffee container in warm soapy water so I'm just wondering if the same should apply for the portafilter and baskets.
    Hi anthonypiccolo

    Sorry for the delay.

    First thing: excess grounds in the chamber will effectively increase the burr clearance and make it coarser (just tested it).

    Cleaning: All I do after every batch of 250g of "ebans" is to take the Vario outside, remove the hopper, then take the top burr carrier off, turn it upside down (wear glasses!) and shake / brush it out the chamber. "Because it is there", I then give the chamber & top burr a puff of dry compressed air to blow out anything else, although I doubt it is really needed. After every "shot session" I give the exit chute a single brush swipe. There is always just a little retained grounds held there on high static days.

    baskets etc: Personally, I never put anything unnecessary in the coffee path of machine or grinder. I always remove the showerscreens and drop them and the p/f holder & baskets in an "efficient in removing coffee" solvent overnight. I rinse them really thoroughly before they go back in the machine! I also run a single shot through the empty basket as a preflush into my cup. Any unwanted odour / taste and I rinse them out again and repeat.

    Hope this helps.

    TampIt

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    TC
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    Good instructions with one exception IMHO. We advise against the use of compressed air anywhere near grinders. It's not good practice and can lead to premature demise when coffee grounds are blown into places where they should not be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    Good instructions with one exception IMHO. We advise against the use of compressed air anywhere near grinders. It's not good practice and can lead to premature demise when coffee grounds are blown into places where they should not be.
    Hi Chris

    After years in the electronic industry I use a twin water trapped, regulated to 40psi "industrial size" compressor and know exactly where and what distance to point the airgun. I can see by reading your post that a lot of CS members could get it (very) wrong and do serious damage. A shame as it is, IMHO, the most effective and fastest way to clean a grinder.

    I will try to remember not to post along those lines again to protect good gear from "less experienced hands"!

    All the best for 2014.

    TampIt

  10. #10
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    I doubt that most people would have access to the equipment you have Tampit... And 40psi is too much anyway. Should never use more than 20psi for this sort of thing.

    Far better to play it safe and simply use a small paint-brush and vacuum cleaner.

    Mal.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member Arcade's Avatar
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    40psi at a distance is not 40psi. It sounds like TampIt has it under control!

    On another note, I'm finding these crazy weather swings are really affecting my grounds from my Vario! Took me 4 shots to get it right this morning….!! Hopefully with more experience I'll be able to predict the result rather than trial and error.

  12. #12
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Yep, Tampit probably has it well and truly under control - That was not the context of my post...

    Also, pressure on its own has nothing whatsoever to do with the actual air velocity as it strikes a barrier. 20psi forcing air through a nozzle ID of 6mm for example, is more than enough air velocity to shift loose grounds. It's still better to recommend that air jets are not used, but rather a brush and vacuum cleaner, which most people have access to and the use of which is not likely to cause any untoward future problems.

    Mal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcade View Post
    40psi at a distance is not 40psi. It sounds like TampIt has it under control!

    On another note, I'm finding these crazy weather swings are really affecting my grounds from my Vario! Took me 4 shots to get it right this morning….!! Hopefully with more experience I'll be able to predict the result rather than trial and error.
    Hi Arcade

    Yep, 40psi at a distance is not 40 psi at contact. However TalkCoffee / Dimal are correct in the sense that newbies could easily destroy their grinder by pushing grounds where they are most unwelcome. Use a brush unless you feel confident at terms of your level of knowledge there.

    crazy weather swings: Remember the Vario is literally named. Espresso grinding has around 75 valid settings (1 A to 3 W) compared to most (non-stepless) grinders 3 or 4. Personally, I would regard it as more like 60 steps: 1 C/D to 3 H(ish). Still way more than any "normal stepped" grinder, and some stepless ones are also quite difficult to adjust in such small stages. Good news: you can adjust temp / humidity / age of beans or even desired shot length to a much greater degree than the average grinder. Bad news: It takes a while to work out that 5 to 10 (perhaps even 25) steps is the kind of change your previous grinder did in one step. Knowing your gear is always the first essential step towards getting the most out of it.

    The other issue: I hope your storage method is up to scratch, as this weather will test it out. This piece of Perth has varied from less than 10 to 43+ with humidity from near zero to 80%+ over the last three weeks. If I did not have a relatively stable temp / humidity environment for storing my beans I would be bald by now from tearing my hair out. It is rare that I do not leave beans in the hopper for a few days, however due to extreme temp / humidity swings it is that time...

    Have fun learning the downside of fine adjustment granularity.

    TampIt

  14. #14
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    I find the easiest way to get a decent clean is to get a household vacuum and place it at the throat of the grinder with the grinder running, tapping it up and down to make/break the seal between hose and grinder throat.

    This seems to dislodge anything that needs dislodging on a frequent basis.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    Hi Arcade

    Yep, 40psi at a distance is not 40 psi at contact. However TalkCoffee / Dimal are correct in the sense that newbies could easily destroy their grinder by pushing grounds where they are most unwelcome.
    TampIt
    This subject seems to come up periodically (don't use compressed air) there is always a reference to the compressed air pushing/blowing coffee grounds into places they shouldn't be or in this case "where they are most unwelcome" these mysterious and obscure places are always referred to obliquely, almost like an unmentionable body part.

    Where exactly are these mysterious places, can someone name them? I have a pretty good idea however will be interesting to hear it from others.

    As a matter of interest, I use compressed air judiciously when cleaning my grinders, have done so for many years and have yet to have a problem with grounds entering no go zones.
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  16. #16
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    There's no secret conspiracy going on here mate...

    Coffee grinds with dimensions measured at the micron level, can and do get pushed under the seals of bearings - Definitely not wanted there for obvious reasons. Depending on the design of some grinders, it is also possible to drive these grinds between casing joints and into the motor windings, as some Grinder Brands don't use a separately encased motor, but rather a unitary construction employing the grinder casing as the motor casing as well.

    Electric motors have a multitude of small air galleries through the stator and rotor to facilitate cooling. If these become blocked over time with coffee grounds and oils (which further attract and hold on to dust), the motor will overheat and eventually fail before its time. I have personally disassembled a couple of grinders where this had occurred (ex cafe grinders) and the windings were absolutely chock-a-block with old coffee grinds and oils. These grinders were dead and beyond economical repair as a result.

    This one was recoverable (from another thread in Grinders)


    Mal.
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    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Can that not result from normal use? Perhaps much more slowly, but I suspect that grinders under normal use will still need this stuff cleaned out. My K6 did when I got it (not nearly to that extent, mind).

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    There's no secret conspiracy going on here mate...

    Coffee grinds with dimensions measured at the micron level, can and do get pushed under the seals of bearings - Definitely not wanted there for obvious reasons. Depending on the design of some grinders, it is also possible to drive these grinds between casing joints and into the motor windings, as some Grinder Brands don't use a separately encased motor, but rather a unitary construction employing the grinder casing as the motor casing as well.

    Electric motors have a multitude of small air galleries through the stator and rotor to facilitate cooling. If these become blocked over time with coffee grounds and oils (which further attract and hold on to dust), the motor will overheat and eventually fail before its time. I have personally disassembled a couple of grinders where this had occurred (ex cafe grinders) and the windings were absolutely chock-a-block with old coffee grinds and oils. These grinders were dead and beyond economical repair as a result.

    This one was recoverable (from another thread in Grinders)


    Mal.
    Knew the answers Mal, was hoping for a little entertainment

    The grinder in your pic has been subjected to a little more than the odd shot of compressed air to blow a few stray grounds out, I suspect more like years of no maintenance.

  19. #19
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    I suspect you're right Yelta...

    Mal.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragunov21 View Post
    Can that not result from normal use? Perhaps much more slowly, but I suspect that grinders under normal use will still need this stuff cleaned out.
    Depends a lot on an individual grinder's design of course. Some fair better than others but even a grinder with a well engineered design, when subjected to high velocity air blasts of coffee grinds, over time, will look much the same...

    It's just better not to use compressed air, especially when a simple clean-up with a brush and vacuum cleaner is all that's needed.

    Mal.
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  21. #21
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    True dat.

    tenchars

  22. #22
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    I only count 9, including the space????

    Off topic..... but were's the tenth? ;-D

  23. #23
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    Curious, all this blow about compressed air...
    I am a tiler by trade and a Licenced builder and on a regular basis grind old glue and concrete- inside occupied houses- so I've got all the good gear to do this. Shrouded diamond grinders - automatic cycle cleaning dust extractors, etc, etc, etc.
    now diamond ground concrete dust is an extreme hazardous abrasive and despite the best gear, over time permeates everything and everywhere. I used to have literally dozens of 'dead' grinders in the shed that I kept for 'parts'. Despite operating in an extremely hazardous environment the vast majority of hand held industrial grinders (dust out) die in the electronics- switches predominately- well before a mechanical failure- bearing, gearbox, even brushes, etc.
    I also use compressed air; well good as all day, every day.
    From hard earned experience I know that if we blow out our grinders- through the tools air vents- on a daily basis with a full 120 psi of compressed air, we get cleaner looking tools, considerably less overheating issues, and a greatly extended service life. Also when we start the grinder next time, we don't get a cloud of baby powder fine concrete dust spew from the vents. They may have removed Asbestos from construction materials, but be aware Silicosis will kill you just as effectively. To the person who might suggest a vacuum is used for this purpose; I say to you, "You have no clue about what you are talking about"

    Now, I'm not suggesting your average coffee grinder should be treated with the same maintenance regime, but realistically; this talk of 40 psi or 20 psi, well sorry, but that's just insult removed

    With my little Pharos I bought the OE Anti-static brush. I have the VD Mods, so the bottom bearing carrier and the bottom of the burr is exposed, in all it's ducks nuts glory. I've discovered that despite my best attentive efforts with the brush, persistent grounds are retained. Now this is the kitchen at home and I'm neither firing up the compressor nor getting out the household vac, that is covered in dog and cat and kid detritus. Now, for the sensitive, please put your fingers in your ears and close your eyes because you'll most likely have a coronary with what I'm about to say.
    I've discovered that a quick puff from my mouth, and all the grinds are 'gone'. Two seconds and the job is done. Compressed air at it's simplest.... I suppose now I will be taken to the market square and put in the stocks for all to vent their derision.

    Seriously, there is nothing at all wrong with using compressed air. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm the last person you need to convince about the incompetence of the average punter. I fix the 'weekend warrior' handyman stuff up jobs; every day of the week.

    Compressed air, in this context, is just a tool. Each and every tool has a right way and a wrong way in how you use it. If and I stress the 'IF' it is used properly; it will do no harm and as some have pointed out- may save you a great deal of time and frustration when doing your maintenance. Anything that makes maintenance easier and quicker has to be a good thing....
    Last edited by Javaphile; 27th January 2014 at 07:30 AM. Reason: Removal of insult
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    About the vario, open it up and see if the white plastic ring around the top round burr is in any way cracked.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ol_Grumpy View Post
    Now, I'm not suggesting your average coffee grinder should be treated with the same maintenance regime, but realistically; this talk of 40 psi or 20 psi, well sorry, but that's just churlish.
    You're comparing apples with oranges mate... Sorry.

    My background is equally as industrially and commercially based as yours, maybe even more so, in Mining and Heavy Industry. No doubt you use Trade quality tools to do your work, I know we did. These are a completely different kettle of fish compared to how even a commercial grinder is manufactured, and many similarly designed fit for purpose electro-mechanical devices. For a start, most decent Trade rated tools use way oversize bearings, gears, etc as they expect them to be abused in the most unfriendly environments imaginable.

    The windings are generally epoxy insulated and encapsulated to enhance toughness and longevity, from what ever contaminants may exist in the atmosphere in which they may be used. Blowing air into these at any typical workshop air pressure will take a long time to cause damage, but it will eventually. Most Grinders I've pulled apart are built to nothing like the standards of any Trade tool/machinery as the types of duty they are expected to encounter don't dictate this. Blowing air into them at velocities possible from a pressure vessel at 130psi+ is never to be recommended. Coffee grounds are very light by comparison with ceramic/concrete dust and simply do not need it. If it's a really old grinder that has never been properly maintained, then sometimes the only way to clear the coffee gunk from the motor innards, would be to immerse into a Hot Ultrasonic Bath for however long it takes. In the end, probably not economical for most people to even consider.

    The Electronics usually fail because dust gets in where it shouldn't and either contaminates contacts of switches (as you pointed out), or coats heat sensitive components such that they are unable to efficiently shed excess heat. Decent quality Trade Tools usually have these components epoxy encapsulated too, so that they can be cleaned and blown out with the minimum of fuss. Equipment that isn't as well protected, such as light commercial hardware similar to Grinders and other similarly manufactured equipment, deserves better treatment otherwise it won't last as long as an owner might expect.

    For most CSers, I'm sure the acquisition of a decent grinder represents a significant investment, therefore the application of appropriate maintenance methods and procedures as described in various posts above, is intended to ensure that they get the longest life possible from their investment. Can't see what is wrong with that...

    Mal.
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  26. #26
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    >Buy HG One
    >Fuggedaboutit
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    There's no secret conspiracy going on here mate...

    Coffee grinds with dimensions measured at the micron level, can and do get pushed under the seals of bearings - Definitely not wanted there for obvious reasons. Depending on the design of some grinders, it is also possible to drive these grinds between casing joints and into the motor windings, as some Grinder Brands don't use a separately encased motor, but rather a unitary construction employing the grinder casing as the motor casing as well.

    Electric motors have a multitude of small air galleries through the stator and rotor to facilitate cooling. If these become blocked over time with coffee grounds and oils (which further attract and hold on to dust), the motor will overheat and eventually fail before its time. I have personally disassembled a couple of grinders where this had occurred (ex cafe grinders) and the windings were absolutely chock-a-block with old coffee grinds and oils. These grinders were dead and beyond economical repair as a result.

    This one was recoverable (from another thread in Grinders)


    Mal.
    I was going to stay out of this, however here is my take based purely on the photo.

    That one could have been cleaned up by me in under a minute using compressed air. FYI, I used to design and build ruggedised, anti-vibration and custom filtered portable computers for NW WA minesites long before the Panasonic Toughbook came out. Ever been in an early model empty Haulpak going down a rough road into a pit? Shakes your bones apart, let alone the fillings out of your teeth. I have dealt with manganese* filled computers that were far worse than that and they were fully retrievable without an ultrasonic bath. You should know things like old type hard disks have an allergy to ultrasonics, and yes, I had one of those in my workshop as well for years. When I did the mining stuff I used to use a fully enclosed ventilated area where the fans alone could have removed most of that gunk (6 * 250cfm in & out, 12 total).

    *For other CSr's: manganese is far stickier and difficult to remove than bauxite, iron ore or most of the other "mining dusts" my machines accumulated in the line of duty. That is why we developed so many different types of filters over a ten+ year period. Coffee grounds are so easy to remove compared to some of those...

    FWIW, that looks like it is mostly caused by static attraction and zero cleaning. The motor brushes are probably shot which then increases the static (by arcing in such an extreme case of neglect) which then attracts everything in the room into the grinder. Probably nothing at all to do with compressed air.

    TampIt
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  28. #28
    TC
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    Regardless of whether you're Beatles or Elvis in this one, home grinders do not do more than a couple of percent of the duty that grinders in commercial operations are likely to see.

    To suggest that there is the slightest requirement for compressed is ludicrous. I have seen grinders with 5 years of home use that have never been pulled down- easily and thoroughly cleaned with brush and vac. That's the real world for CS'ers at home.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    Regardless of whether you're Beatles or Elvis in this one, home grinders do not do more than a couple of percent of the duty that grinders in commercial operations are likely to see.

    To suggest that there is the slightest requirement for compressed is ludicrous. I have seen grinders with 5 years of home use that have never been pulled down- easily and thoroughly cleaned with brush and vac. That's the real world for CS'ers at home.
    I agree, I don't recall anyone saying there 'was a requirement' for compressed air...

    But like I said, in this context it is a tool, and a perfectly valid one for those so equipped...

    And of course with my previous proviso, that like any tool it must be used correctly...

  30. #30
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Interesting to see that describing other posters words as 'churlish' (i.e. boorish, vulgar) is not a personal attack, yet suggesting that someone lives up to their self-chosen nickname is.....what a funny world we live in.

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    So I cleaned my grinder with a brush manually. I also cleaned the hopper and the other storage container that I use. With a fresh bag of beans I noticed that the grind seemed to be finer on the same settings meaning my grinder just may have had too much crap in it. The coffee flowed perfectly. But since then, even with consistent cleaning of my grinder I'm starting to have the same issues where the coffee flows too fast. Perhaps this could be due to beans going stale or being subject to heat/humidity when in the hopper for a few days? I've recently purchased a Sunbeam VAC and you can see my storage solution of beans in an album (Coffee beans storage solution - Imgur). What I have noticed is that it seems to occur more so when using a double basket. Generally the coffee doesn't flow fast with a single basket so perhaps this could be a dosing issue when using a double basket? Then again the flow was fine after I initially cleaned the grinder after starting this thread.

  32. #32
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    Hi Anthony, yes your beans will be ageing quicker if left in the hopper, best idea is to get some one way valve bags , if you buy roasted then they should already be in valved bags, open bag, get enough beans out for how many drinks your making, re-seal the bag, squeeze any excess air out then leave them until your next session, this way they are staying fresh in the bag.

  33. #33
    Senior Member Journeyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    This subject seems to come up periodically (don't use compressed air) there is always a reference to the compressed air pushing/blowing coffee grounds into places they shouldn't be or in this case "where they are most unwelcome" these mysterious and obscure places are always referred to obliquely, almost like an unmentionable body part.

    Where exactly are these mysterious places, can someone name them? I have a pretty good idea however will be interesting to hear it from others.

    As a matter of interest, I use compressed air judiciously when cleaning my grinders, have done so for many years and have yet to have a problem with grounds entering no go zones.
    Sorry I was just caught by the irony of the bold parts...

    I just take the top off mine (EM0480 and EM0450) and use a brush. I might give the vacuum cleaner method a go though - see if it does the job. Less screws to undo if it works - always a plus.

  34. #34
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    Sorry I was just caught by the irony of the bold parts...
    It's not ironic (or hypocritical, which think is what you've getting at) if he's referring to the same mystery-places he initially questioned...

  35. #35
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    Sorry I was just caught by the irony of the bold parts...

    I just take the top off mine (EM0480 and EM0450) and use a brush. I might give the vacuum cleaner method a go though - see if it does the job. Less screws to undo if it works - always a plus.
    Ha, that one went through to the keeper.

    A brush will keep it cosmetically beautiful, however, to access the parts that need cleaning you have to undo a few screws, a quick and simple job, as is reassembly.

    A bit like believing if you keep your car clean and shiny but neglect the servicing you won't have any mechanical problems.

  36. #36
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    Hi,
    I`m not an expert but I suggest way/weight of your tamping could cause the variation you are experiencing?
    I have found the above to significantly alter the rate of pour,
    Cheers.
    RAF2

  37. #37
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    seems like a bulky discussion for a simple solution. clean the grinds with a brush, cloth and lens blower like i do and your grinds will be back the way they are; ceteris paribus.



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