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Thread: Slowing a Grinder Down

  1. #1
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Slowing a Grinder Down

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hello- has anyone had any success with slowing a grinder down? The Mazzer Major for example goes through a reasonable amount of coffee when dialling it in, and it would be nice to be able to slow the speed down for that dialling in process. I was think perhaps a dimmer switch or similar which reduced the current, but don't want to have to open the machine up, nor damage it in any way. Has anyone come across some sort of device that you plug into the wall outlet, which you then plug the grinder into, which can reduce the current. Any other ideas welcome.

  2. #2
    TC
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    Hmm....I can't see what the issue is? It's not about how fast you get a dose worth of grinds rather the volume and grind size. Use the switch and turn the grinder off once you have sufficient to test the grind.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    Hmm....I can't see what the issue is? It's not about how fast you get a dose worth of grinds rather the volume and grind size. Use the switch and turn the grinder off once you have sufficient to test the grind.
    The issue is this.....when changing beans, the grinder needs to be adjusted- fine or course. To do this, I find that you can easily waste up to 50 grams of coffee adjusting until it is right. Might be fine for cafes, but for domestic use like me, I would prefer not to waste so much coffee each time I switch between blends....hence I thought if I could slow the grinder right down for dialling in, it should reduce the waste. Also, I am assuming (as I have read), that the grind adjustment (fine or course) cannot or at least should not be done without the grinder running, so I find that even just starting the grinder to make those adjustments, the coffee is pumping out really fast (more wastage). Hopefully this explains the issue.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Why not just make the initial adjustment without putting the beans in the hopper? The between-shot adjustments shouldn't waste much at all.
    Yelta likes this.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I have a Mazzer Mini, only ever had to "dial it in once" when I first bought it, even then it was a simple process.

    Now I know the grinder I'm usually pretty well spot on, even with new batches of beans, only very minor adjustments are needed.

    I suspect attempting to slow the motor by reducing voltage may have a detrimental affect, might even cause it to fail.

  6. #6
    TOK
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    Interesting question, and my understanding of running appliances on a lower voltage than they should get, is that the windings can run hotter than they should, resulting in possibility of the motor burning out. But I'm not an electrical engineer and there are others in here well qualified to reply to this. Guys?

    Another point of view is that the Major is a volume cafe grinder and by its very nature, it grinds coffee quickly because it is designed to do so. I don't see any advantage in having one in the home and this is precisely one of the "problems" that may manifest for an individual using it in a small volume situation and for whom wastage is important.

    Changing over to a smaller but similar design grinder will help resolve the issue, very probably with no discernible loss in quality in the cup. By this I mean, models such as the Mazzer Mini or Macap M4 or M2, Eureka Mignon, Compak K3, or any other grinder using cafe type flat grinding burrs down to 58 or 50 mm diameter.

    Just some lateral thoughts, in case simply developing an acceptance of how the Major is, is not an option.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    You could drink lattes while you're dialing it in instead of throwing it away. I presume you're impatient to get it right and don't like waste? Milk hides a lot of sins.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feedback guys. I have today purchased a Mazzer Mini. If anyone would like to purchase an excellent Major, please see my other post. Thanks guys

  9. #9
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOK View Post
    Interesting question, and my understanding of running appliances on a lower voltage than they should get, is that the windings can run hotter than they should, resulting in possibility of the motor burning out. But I'm not an electrical engineer and there are others in here well qualified to reply to this. Guys?
    Spot on TOK...

    Reduced voltage is NOT the way to reduce speed on an AC Induction Motor. Specially designed Variable Frequency Drives are what is required and even then, you very much need to know what you are doing...

    Mal.

  10. #10
    Member thundering_gerkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Spot on TOK...

    Reduced voltage is NOT the way to reduce speed on an AC Induction Motor. Specially designed Variable Frequency Drives are what is required and even then, you very much need to know what you are doing...

    Mal.
    Yep.

    Frequency affects the motor RPM.

    In Australia 50Hz gives you 2880 RPM on a 2 pole, 1440 RPM on a 4 pole.
    50 Hz (Frequency in a second) multiplied by 60 (seconds in a minute) gives you 3000 RPM.

    The reason for the slightly slower speed is due to motor inefficiencies.

    I'm sure an electrical engineer could explain it in a lot more detail, that's some info given to me
    by a motor rewinder I used for several years.

  11. #11
    Member Dubbadan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Spot on TOK...

    Reduced voltage is NOT the way to reduce speed on an AC Induction Motor. Specially designed Variable Frequency Drives are what is required and even then, you very much need to know what you are doing...

    Mal.
    I second that



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