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Thread: Mahlkonig K30

  1. #1
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    Mahlkonig K30

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Good morning!

    After recently purchasing a Robur and selling it due to the grind retention being a little bit too high for my personal preference I've sat back recently and done a lot of research. Inadvertently my attention has been pointed at the above mentioned K30 grinder, I've seen a video of it only requiring 2-5g of wastage until a new bean or grind adjustment is actually seen in the portafilter. I've been on every step of the upgraditis ladder starting with the Breville smart grinder > Mazzer Mini > Mazzer Super Jolly > Kony > Robur. I've been very happy with the quality of all these grinders but since I've started taking my roasting seriously single dosing is now a very high priority for me.

    My question is, has anyone here had any direct experience with this grinder and may be able to give me some of their personal feedback or thoughts?

    I've noticed this grinder has quite a large following in the states but is completely disregarded here in Australia. Some people are reporting that they are getting extraction yields on par with the large conical family of grinders, although I question their analysis procedures and wonder if they are biased or fudging some of the stats.

    When I roast I always separate my beans and I love rotating them through my machine, I'm currently using my Breville Smart Grinder with my GS3 which is a bit of a chop out, but to be completely honest it's actually still producing some fantastic coffee. Although the Breville is only maintaining it's position on the bench for filter/pour over duties because it only holds 2-3 grams of retention which is fantastic for single dosing random coffees. If it means that I just go back to a medium sized grinder Macap/Mazzer for my blends and continue with the Smart Grinder for single dosing I may have to continue with that.

    Ps, I know it's an ugly duckling but looks aren't very high on my list.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Have you considered the Compak E or F 10 Conics, (68mm conical) Brendogs?

    K30 has planar burrs, so you are going into flat country with that one.

    Not completely disregarded tho'.... there was one on shot duty at CS Headquarters for ages and one of my

    clients had 5 on the bench. They moved to 5 Robur-e's tho', when they opened a second venue.

    For me, as a roaster, the cup is way more important than any other considerations. Cheers.
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    I've looked at them chokki, I understand I'm going back a step with it being a flat burr but as I said the main concern is getting a good quality grind with a reduced retention.

    I'd love to get a EK43 but it's too big and I do find the shots to be a little thin on those grinders, the one and only reason I like them is because there is almost no grind retention but in terms of usability it's completely manual and has no dosing function so it's on the bottom of my list.

    The K30 is showing some promising stats that I've been reading through and hence why I'm asking about them.

    I would be interested in knowing how your cafe found them, by all accounts the K30 doses just as fast as a Robur E so I would wonder why your customer installed Robur's on the second cafe fitout, what were the pros and cons for the decisions made? In terms of the extraction yields, if they are showing very similar figures to the Robur it surely needs to be on any shortlist. What are your thoughts on the taste of your coffee through their machines? Obviously you are drinking your coffee through your Robur at home, how does it compare when you go on site and taste it through their setup? A little bit thinner, fuller, sour, sweeter etc..

    I'm intrigued to know what your thoughts are.

  4. #4
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Got a few things to do Brendogs, including cranking up the roaster for some late orders.

    Will try to get back to your question a bit later.... it needs more time than what I have, just now. Cheers

  5. #5
    TOK
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    Perhaps I can be of some assistance with perspectives as tempered from my own experiences?

    “...I understand I'm going back a step with it being a flat burr...” ???

    Afraid NOT. That is nothing more than an internet generated furphy.

    Both planar and conical burrs have their place in coffee land and when used accordingly are both excellent. Planar or FLAT grinding plates or burrs are designed for low to medium volume cafe use and specifically for establishments that sell traditional espresso. Ergo, in that scenario flat / planar plate / burr grinders are excellent and result in traditional espresso with the required “bottom end” (body).

    The K30 is designed specifically for the above and is an excellent cafe grinder.....if you want to pay the ransom for your in home use and are prepared to suffer the consequences of using it out of its optimum design environment.

    “...I'd love to get a EK43 but...”

    Well actually, no.... don’t get carried away with the stuff that a vocal minority of anonymous participants post up in forums. As you state in a roundabout way, it’s even less suitable for home use than the K30, and is designed specifically as a bench top deli grinder. Excellent if used as intended, otherwise....???

    “...I would wonder why your customer installed Robur's on the second cafe fitout, what were the pros and cons for the decisions made...”

    Without knowing the specifics of that particular situation, there is usually only one answer in general terms to that despite that many can’t seem to be able to handle it...that being, that the client has succumbed to peer group / “trust network” pressure that nothing short of a Robur will do....for anything....if you want to show that you “care” about the coffee. There are plenty of cafes out there that don’t do a kilo over 30 to 40 a week, and have the requisite 3 Roburs next to their machine. Many call that a breathtaking waste of money, especially the 3rd in line Robur that is catering to maybe 0.5kg of decaff per week.

    If I were to clarify, what that means is that it’s actually more to do with “caring” to portray the “coffee politically correct” image to the punters, than “caring” about the coffee.

    “...Obviously you are drinking your coffee through your Robur at home, how does it compare when you go on site and taste it through their setup? A little bit thinner, fuller, sour, sweeter etc..”

    Can’t speak for Chokki but my take on it would be that it is difficult to make such comparisons without doing side by side comparisons on the spot with the same gear, beans, operator, WATER SUPPLY and techniques used. In the end, when you go out on site and check that all is well, it is about simply making sure that the *system as a whole at that location* is operating / performing at optimum given the beans/gear/water/setup and operators. Not about trying to compare that to something else in your memory (which can be “fooled” without the side by side comparo’s), not to mention that in the end, what does it mean (if one is "...A little bit thinner, fuller, sour, sweeter etc..than the other...."...or not)?

    “...I'm intrigued to know what your thoughts are...”

    Hope to have provided a lateral and hopefully informative perspective, and in the end if you like the K30 what does it matter what it compares to. It is an excellent grinder if you are prepared to go with whatever idiosyncracies it may have given you are using an auto function cafe grinder in a home use situation, and if you are prepared to pay the ransom.

    If you want it, buy it, and and enjoy the K30 for what it is, then turn it over again when you are ready for the next round of experiences.

    Hope that helps.
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  6. #6
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    Always enjoy your insights A...

    Mal.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Brendogs- I've had my Elektra Nino for around one year now. Large conical. Looks awesome on the bench and built like it's going to be found in some archeological dig in 500 years from now. Virtually no retention. Taste profiles have been compared to Robur, although I haven't personally owned a Robur. Doses a double in around 4 seconds. May be worth looking at if retention was the key reason you gave up the Robur.

  8. #8
    TOK
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    Hi there.

    Just some random thoughts:

    The Robur is designed as an ultra high volume cafe grinder. That is, its primary design function is to grind lots of beans without overheating and stopping. The cup characteristics that result from that are shall we say, secondary to the primary objective.

    That largely anonymous commentators with largely unknown bona fides pick it up in the "trust network" to make it the standard to which others should be compared, in terms of the result in the cup, means what? It differs....but what does that mean? Does it mean that other design grinders are not as "good"? What does that say about the silent majority of people that really enjoy and are perfectly happy with their traditional espresso made with different grinders most of them having FLAT plates?

    Additionally, it can only be up to an individual to decide for themselves, if they wish to have a 30 or 35 or whatever kilo piece of equipment that stands about 3 foot tall on their kitchen bench, for their 2 cups of coffee a day. For me, whatever it retains is entirely irrelevant in that it is being used entirely out of context, and anyone that wants one has to, to quote a phrase...."deal with it".

    As far as I am aware and happy to be corrected, the Nino is most probably built on the Macap M7K which can be had for a fraction of the price of the Nino if a comparable grind quality is the brief. Don't know anything about the retention but again, you have to live with what you get when you buy what you wanted to buy and use it in a context which is not what was intended by the designer / manufacturer.

    People should buy what they like, but with the proviso of having made their decision with eyes wide open instead of being manipulated by the trust network to only look at what is currently de rigeur. After that, it's all good

    Hope that helps.
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  9. #9
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    TOK- I hadn't viewed the Macap M7K before, and it may well appeal to some. I think they are substantially different grinders however. The Macap M7K has a doser, weighs 16kg, and has a 400 Watt Motor. The Nino is doserless (best in class design IMHO), weighs 28kg, and has a 1000 watts air-cooled motor.

    I agree, that for the average home user, any titan conical is going to produce a fairly similar result. Apart from price (clearly an important factor)- it will then come down to size (what can one live with), aesthetics, concerns over grind retention, and how much one values "tank-like" qualities. I'm a sucker for the last three, hence my acquisition.

  10. #10
    TC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gavisconi007 View Post
    TOK- I hadn't viewed the Macap M7K before, and it may well appeal to some. I think they are substantially different grinders however. The Macap M7K has a doser, weighs 16kg, and has a 400 Watt Motor. The Nino is doserless (best in class design IMHO), weighs 28kg, and has a 1000 watts air-cooled motor
    Yes- the M7D would be a logical competitor. If it's conical you choose, motor size, cooling etc are completely irrelevant in the home environment. We need to be mindful that this class is designed to do many kilos per day, nit 1kg/week. The nino looks fine, but have no doubt that there is a significant ransom payable because of the brand name. TOK was on the money in his earlier post...
    Last edited by TC; 22nd July 2015 at 07:24 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
    Yes- the M7D would be the logical competitor. If it's conical you choose, motor size, cooling etc are completely irrelevant in the home environment. We need to be mindful that this class is designed to do many kilos per day, nit 1kg/week. The nino looks fine, but have no doubt that there is a significant ransom payable because of the brand name. TOK was on the money in his earlier post...
    Thanks Chris

    I agree they are both fit for purpose, although I was mainly clarifying that the Nino is NOT at all built on the Macap M7D. They are two entirely different beasts.

  12. #12
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post

    K30 has planar burrs, so you are going into flat country with that one.

    Not completely disregarded tho'.... there was one on shot duty at CS Headquarters for ages and one of my

    clients had 5 on the bench. They moved to 5 Robur-e's tho', when they opened a second venue.
    Going into 'flat country' shouldn't be seen as going 'backwards', it's just a fork in the road. I enjoyed a lot of great coffee on Andy's K30.

    Why did they move to Roburs? Their LM machine supplier also supplies Mazzers, amongst other brands, so a good deal

    was in the offing. I think they got the value of two grinders as discount. They were more than happy with the results. The Roburs also have a (slightly)

    smaller footprint, without the spill tray. 5 x K30's took up a lot of space.

    Quote Originally Posted by TOK View Post

    Can’t speak for Chokki but my take on it would be that it is difficult to make such comparisons without doing side by side comparisons on the spot with the same gear, beans, operator, WATER SUPPLY and techniques used. In the end, when you go out on site and check that all is well, it is about simply making sure that the *system as a whole at that location* is operating / performing at optimum given the beans/gear/water/setup and operators. Not about trying to compare that to something else in your memory (which can be “fooled” without the side by side comparo’s), not to mention that in the end, what does it mean (if one is "...A little bit thinner, fuller, sour, sweeter etc..than the other...."...or not)?...... in the end if you like the K30 what does it matter what it compares to. It is an excellent grinder if you are prepared to go with whatever idiosyncracies it may have given you are using an auto function cafe grinder in a home use situation

    If you want it, buy it, and and enjoy the K30 for what it is, then turn it over again when you are ready for the next round of experiences.
    TOK is on the money, here. Also, I rarely had one of my own brews there. Fortunately, my coffee was only on when one of two gun baristas was on duty; I

    found I was able to trust them to do my beans justice. I was a permanent guest roaster there until I withdrew my product (another story and not related to

    grinders) but my coffee wasn't always on pour when I was there.

    I mainly took advantage of being able to sample roasts from the other Melbourne roasters who were on rotation in three of the grinders. House blends in the

    other two, sometimes an SO.

    Thanks TOK, saved me a bunch of two finger typing.
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    Thanks for the advice guys,

    TOK, in regards to your insight. As I was explaining, I have been through the large majority of flat burr setups and I was never really disappointed with the output of them at all! It was more so reading into other products and hearing other peoples glamour stories of how much X product made Y coffee taste 10 times better blah blah. I'm an absolute sucker for upgrading, I actually think it's a new found condition. We should open another section in the forum and call it GP Visit's and the first thread will be Chronic Upgraditis Sufferers. Fortunately for me I have a wad of cash from selling my Robur and can purchase almost every grinder on the market (knowing the k30 costs more) with that so I'm not overly fussed, the only difference this time is I've experienced a large chunk of the market and can make a much more educated decision based on my requirements.

    Chokki, that was a little of a deflated response haha! I was expecting something along the lines of "Well they weren't overly happy with the speed, or they were messy etc etc" Instead they just got a good deal on Robur's

    Gavisconi007, the Nino actually hasn't even been on my list. I'll spend the night reading into whatever information I can find on it. Thanks for that suggestion!

    I completely understand that all these grinders are specifically designed for high volume commercial situations, that's obviously where 90% of their market sales lie. It's the dilemma of us coffee snobs to try and crowbar a high volume monster onto our kitchen benches. I am going to test drive a K30 in the next week or so, once I've got a better insight I can make my decision based on those findings.

    I'll keep you all posted once I've had a good play on this machine. It should be interesting!
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  14. #14
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Please do brendogs.

    I can relate to the upgraditis.... you're certainly not on your own there. :-D

    I'd still encourage you to check out the Compak conicals. I'm in the process of doing the same and am about to

    (hopefully) place one in a clients café.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brendogs View Post
    It was more so reading into other products and hearing other peoples glamour stories of how much X product made Y coffee taste 10 times better blah blah.
    Haha, I was exactly in your spot some time ago. But after all the upgraditis and experiencing the difference myself, I completely agree with everyone here that's not the case. Flat and conical produce slightly different taste profile, but none is superior than another - only different and only if you are not pouring the shot into a laar-tay or flat white. I've been through a lot of grinders and eventually come back to a big conical (Compak K10 PB), because it's (i) more forgiving and easier to get good pours (ii) almost no fussing with dialing in day-to-day and very little bean-to-bean (iii) dosered setup (and lower rpm) can be adapted to single dosing and almost zero retention (purging 1g-2g?not for me ;p) (iv) when used way below the designed usage it would under commercial, these things last almost forever, that spells awesome for me.....and the taste is an icing on the cake, which is obviously welcomed by me too. The nuances presented by big conical are more noticable and last longer, but at the expense of heightened brightness. Better? Probably not. But if you like it, why not?

    K30 users reported that it is not suitable for single dosing if that's what your plan is (home barista is a good resource). Same for the Elektra Nino. That's probably due to the fast burrs rotation. They're best run with a beans-loaded hopper. But they're a good walk up grinder - purge, grind and go. No need to weigh and load the beans. But you sacrifice the ability to grind different beans on the same day (that's the greatest advantage of single dosing IMO).
    Last edited by samuellaw178; 23rd July 2015 at 09:38 AM.

  16. #16
    htb
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    Have a look at the Mythos One and the Versalab M3.

  17. #17
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Just got home from deliveries and thought I'd mention the Versalab but have been pipped to the post.

    I've seen one in action and I'm still drooling. ;-). Almost no retention, (if that's your thing) other than some

    grinds sticking to the lower face of the bottom burr via static, however, the owner of the one I saw said that

    ordering one is a grind. The makers don't always feel like putting one together, apparently, so you might have to order, pay, then wait.

    Beautiful grinder tho'.

  18. #18
    TC
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    We all know that there are in fact only 2 suitable grinders on the market for CS'ers. They would be the Barootza Precheesioh and the Milkmaidig EK43.

    Each grinder is guaranteed to put nuances into the cup that mere immortal grinders can only aspire to.

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    I think the Versalab is something I would end up getting a little annoyed with over time. A little bit too much assing around for me, I've actually got a job early next week at a cafe that has Mythos grinders on the bench so I'm no doubt going to dive into those. After reading into them they seem to have advertised 1-2 grams of retention as a key selling point. Considering the coffee chute is only 2cm long from the burr chamber I actually think that may be a realistic figure.

    I'm moving house at the end of the year and my lovely partner has allocated a 2 meter space in the kitchen/dining area for a coffee station. I'm going to make a lovely timber messmate bench top because I recently saw a picture where someone had made coffee bench/station and the grinders were either sunken a little or the machine was on a platform I can't quite remember. But the goal in mind for this particular person was to make his monster Robur not tower over the single group Slayer which I think may be an option for me because all the grinders we have spoken about here are nearly double the size of my sweet sweet GS/3!

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    Chris, Milkmaidig 😂😂😂

    Classic!
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  21. #21
    TC
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    Quote Originally Posted by brendogs View Post
    Chris, Milkmaidig 

    Classic!
    Yes brendogs. Why mine actually baked me a Pav the other day...
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  22. #22
    htb
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    Quote Originally Posted by brendogs View Post
    I'm moving house at the end of the year and my lovely partner has allocated a 2 meter space in the kitchen/dining area for a coffee station. I'm going to make a lovely timber messmate bench top because I recently saw a picture where someone had made coffee bench/station and the grinders were either sunken a little or the machine was on a platform I can't quite remember. But the goal in mind for this particular person was to make his monster Robur not tower over the single group Slayer which I think may be an option for me because all the grinders we have spoken about here are nearly double the size of my sweet sweet GS/3!
    Versalab sits about the same height as the GS3.

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    As usual TC tries to childishly denigrate stuff he does not like / does not sell / outlasts / needs less maintenance than at least some of his preferred products. As an ex Robur owner myself, nothing would persuade me to go back to one of them at home - they are a high volume CAFE grinder. Ditto in a cafe, as my old Mazzer Major would be a much better fit, although it also is not particularly good at home.

    I am also over stupid comments about the EK43. Those comments are not only puerile, they are easily disproved. Just grab a few grinders, a few sheets of white paper and a magnifying glass (thats right, you don't even need a microscope to pick the difference between the EK43 / K30 and the rest of the pack mentioned - not subtle). In a few hours you would have all the proof you need in front of you. Just try to get that narrow particle performance across a whole range of grinding textures from Turkish to "far coarser than plunger" in ANY other grinder listed in the posts above - I guess some CSrs just do not like the facts getting in the way of the mystique, which is why they do not produce any testing data to back their claims up.

    The reason K30's are almost unknown in the US is so startlingly simple that I am surprised at least one of the self styled experts did not outline it. I have posted several times that Baratza markets the Mahlkonig / Ditting range as well as their own designs in the US. Mahlkonig / Ditting market under their own labels in the rest of the world. Baratza market a strengthened Vario called the Forte (the one I saw used a gen1 Vario mechanism within a metal case, for domestic plasticphobes I guess) and they do not sell the K30 over there at all.

    FWIW, I wouldn't have an EK43 or a K30 at home either - they are my first choice for testing roasts, however they are closer to a scientific instrument than a cafe grinder, still not really a good unit to live with domestically.

    As an ex GS3 owner (both the 110volt "joke" and the 240 volt "real one") for home use I would recommend what I have - 2 * Mahlkonig gen2 Varios (one for my preferred light / medium roasts & one for guest's dark roasts or decaf needs). They have about 50 real espresso settings (out of a few hundred overall), so tracking any cantankerous roast is almost childishly simple. Why are they so good at home? The answer is in a series of "no's" and "minimal"s.

    No fuss, no bench mess, no static, no clumping, no rubbish in the coffee path (i.e. like dosers, IMO completely unsuitable at home). Minimal grind retention, dosing variation, noise, bench space, power consumption, burr wear, particle spread variation & maintenance.

    The bad news - Varios are tuned for Turkish to espresso only, so if you do cold drip / steep, plunger et al then you will need another grinder for that (in my shed, as SWMBO banned it from the house on noise / headache grounds).

    The scary thing is the two Varios only cost me $1,400 (easily within your budget) and they make life so much easier than almost any setup with a similar budget - any family gathering and the second one is worth its weight in platinum.

    Just thought it was time to add a little bit of factual info to the thread.

    Enjoy your GS3 (lucky SOB, mine is a divorce casualty).

    TampIt
    PS - I have no commercial interests in the industry at all, I have just spent too many years sorting out cantankerous, over rated gear at too many sites to list (or even to recall) them all since 1970.
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  24. #24
    TC
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    And....as usual Tampit copies and pastes his previous post on a weekly or fortnightly basis. Yawn..

    Where you get it wrong is that your chosen grinder is one we choose not sell as it represents very poor value for money- unless it can bake me a sponge that is?

    Herewith, 1 x sense of humour.
    Last edited by TC; 24th July 2015 at 03:39 AM.
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  25. #25
    TOK
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    That's not a coffee grinder....THIS IS a COFFEE GRINDER !

    Brendogs, your space should be big enough for this'un .

    In for a penny, in for a pound.

    Thankfully some of us have a sense of and enjoy a bit of humour, and don't need clip boards holding technical "fact" sheets, magnifying glasses and sheets of white paper to enjoy our coffee, made with simple, very reliable and very long lived equipment, suited to the task...

    For my professional coffee industry lab work, I used a KR804. I could take one home if I wanted to, but it's.....not suited to the task. Sorry if it doesn't measure up to an EK43 in the academic discussion. However owing to need to use equipment that is comparable to that which is used in almost 100% of cafe business (where most coffee is sold) for Quality Control and on a point of real life suitability, I probably should have been using a cafe specific 70 to 80 mm flat plated coffee grinder of brand and model usually used in that business sector, rather than the KR804.

    That is real life stuff not forum drama.

    In the showroom of the very successful roastery /equipment / cafe business that I still own but which is under 100% management, they give equal space to the Mahlkonig Vario grinder alongside other similar capacity home use grinders, and the clients are allowed to make their own decisions. Frankly the Vario is the smallest seller in the range because real life clients (thankfully) are not forum reading tech heads, and take a more wholistic approach to their purchase.

    I too am over stupid comments about the EK43. Its a deli grinder not a home use grinder....not suited to the task. So not much point some people always harping on about it...

    Too much mumbo jumbo written about technical /academic / theoretical stuff by a lot of people including those that don't work in the biz to see what is required in real life situations and who DONT have to deal with lots of clients from a SUPPLIER point of view.

    Coffee making and enjoyment shouldn't and don't need to be that hard.

    By the way, the grinder in the picture trumps the EK43. Take a look :This is a grinder.jpg
    Last edited by TOK; 24th July 2015 at 02:17 PM.
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  26. #26
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Looks like you'd need a 1kg purge in the morning just to clear the throat of that beauty!

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    Haha!

    My coffee station bench top will more than likely need a trench in the slab to get that puppy in there!

    I'm keeping an open mind with this next purchase so if that grinder is showing good reviews I definitely need it on the shortlist ����

  28. #28
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    So I thought I would post my updates. After all the searching, researching, testing, sampling, advice, more searching, tasting, researching and more advice. I ended up with a Mythos One!

    My biggest reason for following through with this purchase was the grind retention being so low. This was a huge factor for me because I love to single dose and I also have a paranoia with wastage so it was a very obvious choice I believe. The reviews and data I've seen from peoples testing all over the place are showing it performing in the absolute top of the league in terms of being the pinnacle of grinders. By no means am I saying it's the best but the results that people are having with are on par or above it's market rivals.
    To be honest I don't really care about that mumbo jumbo, all I know is that I haven't poured a bad shot since I've put it on the bench. Out of the box the first 22g of coffee I ground went straight into the machine and gave me a 28 second pour which I had a chuckle about because I thought to myself "This is just too easy!"

    With the grind retention I want to do a little test and get some of the Grindz or just a darker roasted coffee against a lighter roasted coffee and see how much coffee it takes for it to completely flush out the previous old grinds. So far every time I've single dosed it is giving me almost identical output, for example - 22.2g in, 22.2g out and it has been within .1g for over 20 shots so far!

    After more testing and tasting I will post up some more info with a few videos of the grinds retention and fluffiness of the grinds. It looks absolutely brilliant coming out of the coffee chute!


    IMG_6880.JPG


    IMG_6881.JPG
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  29. #29
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Wow!

    It's a substantial beastie for sure.
    Sounds as though you're pretty happy with it and that's great...

    Mal.

  30. #30
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    Funnily enough it's a big grinder but you have to remember that the GS3 is probably one of the smallest machines on the market in terms of height. It's a very slimline design.

    I sat it next to my Expobar Minore at work and it's only an inch or so taller than that so its a nice height.

    My Mazzer Mini is taller than my GS3 😂
    Dimal likes this.

  31. #31
    htb
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    Awesome. I very nearly bought a Mythos myself.

  32. #32
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    How much is a mythos?

  33. #33
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    They retail at around $2980ex GST

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by brendogs View Post
    So I thought I would post my updates. After all the searching, researching, testing, sampling, advice, more searching, tasting, researching and more advice. I ended up with a Mythos One!
    Hi brendogs. How's the Mythos One going. Really interested in feedback and thoughts.

  35. #35
    JM
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    Quote Originally Posted by _moby_ View Post
    ...How's the Mythos One going. Really interested in feedback and thoughts.
    Can I weigh in? I recently upgraded from Mazzer Super Jolly to the Mythos One. I'll start a new thread on it my initial experiences with it rather than post here, as this one is originally about the Mahlkonig K30



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