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Thread: Help with Mazzer Kold

  1. #1
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    Help with Mazzer Kold

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi guys,

    This is a pretty noobish question but someone was playing around with my Mazzer Kold grinder and I'm having trouble getting the grind back.
    No matter what I do, I can't seem to get it right.
    The coffee is coming our really thin, oily and watery. It's still taking about 40seconds to do a 20 dose and a 40g yield.
    What am I doing wrong? Do I need to go finer or coarser? I think it's really messed up.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    Interesting, thin and watery would suggest too coarse but 1:2 in 40 seconds suggests too fine. Someones going to ask you about freshness of your beans

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by evro50 View Post
    Interesting, thin and watery would suggest too coarse but 1:2 in 40 seconds suggests too fine. Someones going to ask you about freshness of your beans
    Thanks for the reply.

    They were roasted on the 1st.
    Its not the beans. If I put them through my other grinder they are perfect. :S

  4. #4
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Hi EB
    There is a change when you step up to a large conical - not sure what you're moving from.
    With the Robur, I found the pour quite different to my M4. It starts thin, but the crema builds slowly to a normal amount like pouring a guinness, where the M4 had lots of crema at the beginning which then settled to normal.
    I've also found that finer grind / lighter tamp seems to work better with the Robur.
    Also, you must remember that there is a huge grind path with these - it can take 3-4 doubles to show up grind changes. So if you are only doing a couple of shots a day, there will be some 'settling' of the coffee in the grind path.

    But with all these things aside - how does it taste? Never judge a grinder or machine based on what a pour looks like on youtube
    Cheers Matt
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  5. #5
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    Thanks for the reply Matt.

    I have got it to a point where it starts really thin but builds up to a nice creme.
    It's still strange though, that two different grinders with the same beans would pour differently?

  6. #6
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElephantBean View Post
    Thanks for the reply Matt.

    I have got it to a point where it starts really thin but builds up to a nice creme.
    It's still strange though, that two different grinders with the same beans would pour differently?
    I suspect it might have something to do with the grinding action. Planar grinder are more of a grinding/tearing action. I'm guessing that the grinding action of planar's give a more varied grind surface, making the resulting pour more volatile - not worse (before anyone starts jumping up and down!), just different - more reactive in shape and therefore more volatile during the pour.

    The action in conical grinders is much more of a consistent 'slice' for want of a better word. More consistent, more even - but less reactive - in crema or flavour (dare I say it). This is possibly why I've found that with the Robur (and the Lido), I virtually cannot get a bitter, over-extracted pour - the difference in flavour between 25sec or 1 minute pours is not that great - just an decrease in acidity really. I certainly don't get the flavour variations dependent on grind, dose, pour etc that I used to get with the M4 - but I also don't get the interesting flavour variations

    Probably the best way of thinking about it is like a chemical reaction. Dropping a handful of iron filings into an acid should give a much more aggressive reaction than a same handful of small ball bearings…

    These are a just my scientifically untested & unvalidated thoughts, based on experience and general musing

    Cheers Matt
    Dimal and ElephantBean like this.



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