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Thread: Which grinder

  1. #1
    Senior Member csutak40's Avatar
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    Which grinder

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    My cousin in Hungary just decided to learn to make coffee. She has only ever used a moka pot and tells me that the coffee it produces is really bad, but (now that I've sent her some youtube videos) realised that the problem is probably with the operator (although she has an el-cheapo chinese one)
    She now wants to learn to do it properly and buy new equipment. Didn't really state her budget (not that it would mean much to me, as she is in Hungary)
    Told her that she should probably start by buying a grinder and then look at a better moka pot or possibly an aero press. She just discovered (never noticed before) that there is a barista shop across the street from where she lives. She intends to go there today to have a look around. She said that a relative has an electric coffee machine they stopped using and will give her a lend to try (some Hungarian brand I've never heard of)
    She just sent me this link, https://www.mindenamibar.com/barista...kezi_kaveorlok asking what I thought. From this I gather she only intends to look at manual ones. I have never studied manual grinders and don't have time to read about these. I did tell her that she should make sure she gets and adjustable one, so that, should she decide to upgrade her knowledge, she can keep using it. She says that all of the ones on the link are supposed to be adjustable
    Could someone (who has used manual grinders) advise please as to which, if any, would be any good out of this lot? I just haven't got the time to research these today
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  2. #2
    Senior Member matth3wh's Avatar
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    Either the Rhinoware or Hario Skerton/Mini will get her started. Add an Aeropress (8.745 Ft) and make life easy.

    They list the AeroPress szett utazashoz travel bundle for 17 Ft (which gets her the Aeropress Hario Mini and metal filter)
    LeroyC likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member csutak40's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matth3wh View Post
    Either the Rhinoware or Hario Skerton/Mini will get her started. Add an Aeropress (8.745 Ft) and make life easy.

    They list the AeroPress szett utazashoz travel bundle for 17 Ft (which gets her the Aeropress Hario Mini and metal filter)
    Thanks very much, I appreciate it

  4. #4
    Senior Member csutak40's Avatar
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    Well, she bought the Hario Skerton/Mini. They didn't have any Aeropress in stock, nor any moka pots. However, they did sell her some Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, which I'm not sure if the first coffee I would buy to learn on :-) She got lent a coffee machine, which looks like a small espresso machine, but apparently it isn't. One must put just enough water in it that is needed for the coffee being made and the instructions say NOT to tamp. A jug is used for the coffee, not a cup. Most peculiar machine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFLvOWhSG9w

  5. #5
    Senior Member readeral's Avatar
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    Seems like a fully enclosed moka pot style system, in the guise of an espresso machine. No stovetop required. Very curious!

    No tamping is definitely sound advice, given the brew took them 4 minutes already!

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Ah I remember these machines. My very first 'espresso' machine was such a one. These types of machines were all the rage in the US back in the 80's and 90's and are still readily available today. Here's an example of a simple cheap one: Target : Expect More. Pay Less.

    I'd never thought of them as an electric moka pot before but that is indeed pretty much what they are. They can make a nice cup of joe but they don't produce an espresso as they are a very low pressure system. Some use dual walled baskets while others have single walled ones. Some have so called 'turbo frothers' on them while others have more of a standard steam wand jet. Some allow you to froth with the same 'pot' of water as you brew with while others like the one Csutak40 linked to require you to take the portafilter off and swap out the basket for the blind/blank disc and refill the boiler. I don't know if your friend got the instruction manual with the machine but on most of them the best cup is produced by removing the pot of brewed coffee before all the water boils out to avoid burning the coffee/grounds and putting a cup or other catching container in it's place to catch the last of the brew. Additionally once the coffee stops flowing the switch needs to be turned off so you don't burn out the element and the steam valve should be opened to let the boiler come to zero pressure before you remove the portafilter and then the screw on cap. Failure to do this can result in scalding steam, water, and coffee grounds to be sprayed everywhere.


    Java "Be safe!" phile
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  7. #7
    Senior Member csutak40's Avatar
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    I found the manual on line (which is where I saw the do not tamp instruction) and forwarded it to her. They are interstate ATM, so having bought the grinder and the coffee, haven't yet tried making coffee. Funny you should say that you would remove the coffee before it finishes. I have already written to her that I would stop it when the gurgling starts.



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