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Thread: Hand grinder vs Electric for low use

  1. #1
    Member SunnyCoastDazza's Avatar
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    Hand grinder vs Electric for low use

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    This has probably come up a million times I知 sorry but I知 new here.
    i usually only make 1-2 espressos a day. I top up my intake with another 6 or so instant a day.

    may I please ask would a ROK or Lido be comparable to a Sette 270 or similar in regard to quality of espresso grind and perhaps micro adjustment to dial in my grind?

    thank you

  2. #2
    Senior Member deegee's Avatar
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    I can't comment on the Lido, as I've never used one. The ROK grinder is a great design - very ergonomic - and quite well built, BUT it is let down by cheap crappy burrs. ( Unless they have upgraded the burrs recently, which I doubt ). They appear to be cast, not machined, not very sharp.

    When they were first released, there were numerous threads about this on forums in UK and in the US. Some posters saying that they could grind for espresso with no problems, but many others who could not grind fine enough even on the lowest possible setting. The problem may have been poor quality control of the burrs, so some people got a good set, some got bad, and some were in between.

    I got a bad set, which were replaced when I complained, by an equally bad set !!. Eventually replaced the burrs in mine with Etzinger burrs similar to those used in some of the Lido's. That has made it into a really good grinder.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    I had a 270w, and now a lido E. I drink the 1-2 doubles each day. If I have a visitor, I hand them the grinder to grind for the next drink. I single dose the lido, so pre-packed portions in snaplock bags in the freezer.
    The (all) electric grinders are noisy and space wasters (imo).
    I recommend the lido E over a 270 or any other electric grinder.

    I do not suggest it if you are a little fragile in health. It is not hard work but my 86yo grandmother would struggle, a lot!
    Also lighter roasts will make you realise that the beans are quite a bit harder. A dark roast almost self grinds in comparison.

    I have made a scale to ensure accuracy and fine adjustment on the lido. It is only some measuring tape stuck to the adjusters, but it's good so far. So I grip the lock ring, loosen the base. Then move the lockring to its new grind setting and hold it, then tighten the base back to its marked lock setting. All while pressing against chest (some YouTube tip?). I Iuse a artist paintbrush to sweep grinder clean after each use.15532210736196057159967573471292.jpg
    So in the pic, my grind setting is 52, and I tighten the base back to the 60 (or 5.2 and 6.0).
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  4. #4
    Member SunnyCoastDazza's Avatar
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    Hi Deegee, I appreciate your comments. Just the type of information I need. I wonder if some find manual grinders an inconvenience? Also are the grinds really suitable for espresso?

  5. #5
    Member SunnyCoastDazza's Avatar
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    Thanx Jackster, hmmm you may be on target. Thank you for the image

  6. #6
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyCoastDazza View Post
    Hi Deegee, I appreciate your comments. Just the type of information I need. I wonder if some find manual grinders an inconvenience? Also are the grinds really suitable for espresso?
    Yes, no doubt some people will find manual inconvenient, others won't. The response will often be tainted by the particular hand grinders that they've tried. The 'E' in the Lido E stands for espresso. I can choke a double-springed lever machines with my Lido E-T (t = travel). I've used the Lido E-T for months on end when overseas, for both espresso and other applications, and works well overall. I probably averaged 3-4 coffees a day, and don't find the grinding process too onerous. In terms of grind quality, I think the Lido is a little better than my electric Macap M4D....more consistent size and much less clumping. There is some static, however, which can mean that some grinds stick to burrs for a little while after grinding.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    The lido E will definately do espresso with a pretty big margin. I spent a fair amount of time aligning the burrs and ended up with a small burr rub at -0.2 (in the lido scalings). This is at 10 on my scale. So I am at around 90ー coarser than the burr touching point. It will certainly choke my machine without any problem at all.
    I use a 6910 or a Musica with 18g vst basket, aiming for 2:1 in 30 sec.... And close... Though my tamping with the vst is a work in progress.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    The E and et are similar. The et has a folding handle and is black. The E is solid handle and silver. Same adjuster threads. I don't travel with mine as I travel with porlex mini and aeropress.
    I wanted the et when I was traveling with it. The top plug on the et is worthwhile too. Mine bounces bean bits out sometimes. That's ok outside, but not perfect on the kitchen floor.
    SunnyCoastDazza likes this.

  9. #9
    Member SunnyCoastDazza's Avatar
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    Sounds like you have it well sorted Jackster

  10. #10
    Senior Member deegee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyCoastDazza View Post
    Hi Deegee, I appreciate your comments. Just the type of information I need. I wonder if some find manual grinders an inconvenience? Also are the grinds really suitable for espresso?
    It's been said more than once here on CS, that the fun of grinding by hand wears off fairly quickly, especially when users find their coffee consumption rising, as their expertise grows and the quality of their coffee improves.

    I have a Hario Skerton hand grinder, but hardly ever use it. The ergonomics - holding the container in one hand and rotating the handle in the horizontal plane - make it uncomfortable and inconvenient to use. It will grind fine enough for espresso, but it takes a lot of rotations to grind a shot.

    I have not used any of them, but I believe that there are several other hand grinders which are much faster, more comfortable to use, and will grind fine enough.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyCoastDazza View Post
    i usually only make 1-2 espressos a day. I top up my intake with another 6 or so instant a day.
    This bit caught my curiosity.

    Since you have the equipment and know how to make espresso, what痴 the story with the 6 instant coffees?

    Is it a case of espresso at home and instant at the office or some other situation?
    level3ninja likes this.

  12. #12
    Member SunnyCoastDazza's Avatar
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    Hi Herzog, I’ve had a few machines in the past with mixed results. Currently have a duo temp and picked up the Gaggia yesterday. I keen to learn more an put more effort into my coffee making. I also plan on attending some barista classes. I’m on the fence with the grinder as I usually take a heap of preground coffee when I travel and a mocha pot. I wouldn’t like to spend more than 450ish whether it be manual or electric. I’m not sure if an electric entry level grinder around my budget will have the goods hence the manual grinder enquires. To answer your question I’m not that good but need the caffeine. I’ve cutdown from 12 or so instant. I may in the future make more espresso. Sounds like I’m starting to answer my own question as my needs may be changing

  13. #13
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deegee View Post
    It's been said more than once here on CS, that the fun of grinding by hand wears off fairly quickly, especially when users find their coffee consumption rising, as their expertise grows and the quality of their coffee improves.

    I have a Hario Skerton hand grinder, but hardly ever use it. The ergonomics - holding the container in one hand and rotating the handle in the horizontal plane - make it uncomfortable and inconvenient to use. It will grind fine enough for espresso, but it takes a lot of rotations to grind a shot.

    I have not used any of them, but I believe that there are several other hand grinders which are much faster, more comfortable to use, and will grind fine enough.
    Have to agree with your comments Degee.

    I have a Rosco hand grinder, whilst its quite capable of grinding for espresso I wouldn't even thing about it for daily use at home, fine for camping when no power available, but, winding the handle, at first a novelty, rapidly becomes a pain in the rear end, after a few weeks of using it daily combined with the Flair, its an absolute pleasure to get back home to an electric grinder.
    matth3wh and Kjarsheim like this.

  14. #14
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    Have to agree about the fading novelty value of a hand grinder for ongoing home usage ( I have a Zass Quito, Feld2 and Aergrind, I had a laugh!)...especially if dealing with larger /multiple doses.<br>
    I pottered along for about 6 months on the hand grinder only trail, and yes do use the Aergrind which is pretty fast and very good for espresso with my Flair or Aeropress while working away.<br>
    And after the 2 weeks I am kinda happy to see my Macap when I get home.<br>
    FWIW, the Macap M2M is a very good compact and fairly tidy little grinder for the money and perhaps within your budget. Recommend the micrometric adjuster. Should last for decades,too.

  15. #15
    Member SunnyCoastDazza's Avatar
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    Thank you for your comments. So confusing for a newbie such as myself looking for an upgrade. So many grinders under the $500 mark m2m, rocky, 270, isteel, imini, masanino. My head is going to explode ��

  16. #16
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyCoastDazza View Post
    Thank you for your comments. So confusing for a newbie such as myself looking for an upgrade. So many grinders under the $500 mark m2m, rocky, 270, isteel, imini, masanino. My head is going to explode 
    If you stay with grinders that have gained a degree of accepance (and don't show up constantly in the problem pages) on Coffee Snobs you wont go far wrong.

    Of the machines you list, the only ones I have heard of are "m2m, rocky, 270" the others don't ring a bell.
    SunnyCoastDazza likes this.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyCoastDazza View Post
    So many grinders under the $500 mark m2m, rocky, 270, isteel, imini, masanino. My head is going to explode 
    Don't forget you can also get more expensive grinders second hand in that range as well

    I currently use a manual grinder (Hario Skerton) for my (espresso) coffees at home and electric grinders (Quamar Q50E) at work so I use both daily and can see their pros and cons.

    I've also done a lot of research into this due to wanting to upgrade my skerton and wondering if I should stick with manual or switch to electric and can definitely relate to how very easy it is to go down a grinder rabbit hole researching grinders only to come out not any closer in knowing what you want!

    Generally the pros of a manual are:
    • Cheaper / better quality at the low end of the budget
    • Low grind retention
    • Low space footprint
    • As quiet as you're going to get


    While in contrast, generally the pros of an electric are:
    • Speed (you especially miss this when dialling in new beans)
    • Effortless


    That's not to say that can't get a quiet low retention electric grinder (but it'll cost you more than $450) or vice versa.

    So you really need to decide what's the most important for you and buy the grinder which better suits your needs.
    Don't stress too much about it as at the end of the day the grinder will still grind beans and if you really don't like it you can always on-sell it
    SunnyCoastDazza likes this.

  18. #18
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    I’ve been using the Lido ET for quite a while now for month long trips overseas, works great for 1-2 daily, probably a pain for anymore than that. Only complaint is that it’s designed for espresso and travel but yet is quite large

  19. #19
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    It is large for travel. It could be much shorter and only really needs to hold 20ish g of beans in the hopper, not 150g...



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