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Thread: A Step into the Unknown

  1. #1
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    A Step into the Unknown

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hello again to all the fine people here at Coffee Snobs, *:)

    i have to say over the year odd i have been a member here, i really have apreceated the help and views of everyone here...further to this i can say that it is from Coffee Snobs that i got the inspiration to go out and get my Silvia and Rocky combo.. And what an investment in my tastebuds that was!

    Anyway now it is that i am taking the next step into the world of roasting as a newbie to the field *i would like to know are the steps to roasting the perfect batch? and the dos and do nots to keep in mind. *

    Look forward to hearing from you all,

    DD


  2. #2
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
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    Re:  A Step into the Unknown

    Quote Originally Posted by Derkdigler link=1130317040/0#0 date=1130317040
    Anyway now it is that i am taking the next step into the world of roasting as a newbie to the field *i would like to know are the steps to roasting the perfect batch? and the dos and do nots to keep in mind. *

    Look forward to hearing from you all,

    DD
    Oh... the easy ones first hey?

    What sort of a roasting method were you looking at using?

    DO:
    Start with single origins if possible. I think it gives you a better introduction than trying to roast blends right away.
    Roast your first few a bit dark to give you an idea of how far you can go. As some have already said, it is sometimes worth burning a batch to see what happens, but I would not recommend doing it in an Imex or similar. Also, you need to be careful not to end up with the flaming bowl of beans - it can happen!
    Be prepared to never be impressed by pre-roasted beans again.
    Keep records of your roasts so you have an idea of roast profiles for specific beans.

    DONT:
    Delay. Act now.

    Brett.

  3. #3
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    Re: *A Step into the Unknown

    Hey Brett,
    * * * * * * * i will keep that in mind. *:D. so it is trial and error to some existent? , i was thinking of starting on East Timor Organic coffee. is it worth asking the supplier for some advice, with regards to the hue profiles of the beans?

    Thanks,

    * * * * * * *DD

  4. #4
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
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    Re:  A Step into the Unknown

    Never hurts to ask.

    The supplier might be able to suggest a roast profile for the bean, but as you said, it really is trial and error to a degree.

    The great thing about home roasting is that you can come up with your own profile for beans. You might find you like a bean darker or lighter than suggested. With all the different coffees I have roasted in the last 18 months, Ive never been really disappointed with any. Ive liked some more than others, but generally, its pretty good being able to roast your own.

    Good luck.

  5. #5
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    Re:  A Step into the Unknown

    http://www.sweetmarias.com/roasting-VisualGuideV2.html is a good resource for one starting out in the world of home roasting. As a complete newbie, probably your best bet would be to start at the most economical of home roasters, popcorn popper or heat gun.

    I would suggest getting a thermometer of some sort, either a thermocouple or an IR thermometer (both easily purchased from Dick Smith or Tandy). If you decide to get a popper, youd probably need a chimney. Heinz very special soup tins work well, as do other tins (other users may chime in with their preferred ones).

    I have created a device to collect chaff and keep beans from spilling out of the popper http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1126057714. I simply took a mesh grease splatter guard and moulded the mesh into a sock-like shape. You can even buy some aluminium flyscreen and do the same.

    You need a scale. Digital ones are extremely accurate, but a bit spendy, so just a normal analog kitchen scale will do the trick for a lot less cash. The scale is important to 1. Ensure consistent weight of roasts, 2. To accurately help measure the threshold of your popper. Most poppers will have a thermal cutoff switch that turns the popper off when the roasting chamber gets too hot (e.g. when you have too many beans to be moved by the fan).

    Roasting is simply putting the beans in, turning the popper on, and shaking for about 30 seconds until the beans are able to be moved about without manual assistance. Depending on ambient temperature, youll hear the first snaps of 1st crack shortly. This sounds like the breaking of small twigs. This will carry on for a bit, then stop. Most times there will be a transition period, while the beans heat further, of no cracking. Then you will start to hear the first bits of 2nd crack. You have to listen closely, as these cracks will be similar to the sound of rice bubbles in milk. If your popper is loud, you may barely hear them at all. I often let my beans roast well into 2nd crack, usually at least a minute or so. Your nose and eyes will tell you when to stop.

    After shutting the popper down, now is the time to cool the beans. CSers all have different ways to cool the beans down, from elaborate fan forced devices, to simply tossing them from colander to colander. Cooling should really be as quickly as possible, to arrest the roasting process, as beans will continue to hold heat for a while, even after heat is removed. This can lead to over-roasting, which may change the characteristics of the coffee.

    You can sample the coffee as soon as you like, but I prefer to let the beans rest for 24 hours. Others will give their optimal time for tasting the finished product.

    Storage can be as simple as ziploc baggies stored away from light and heat. As long as you keep them in a controlled environment, they shouldnt stale too quickly. Some beans will release CO2 more than others. I tend to burp the bags to remove all of the CO2, from time to time.

    Welcome to the new world of home roasting! Hope you enjoy a time and money consuming new hobby.

    DISCLAIMER: Once youve tasted your own home-roasted coffee, you may refuse to buy coffee anywhere else again.

  6. #6
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re:  A Step into the Unknown

    Youve covered it all pretty well nunu,

    Great advice, clearly explained... cant do better than that [smiley=tekst-toppie.gif]

    Mal.


  7. #7
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    Re:  A Step into the Unknown

    ... have you tried the heatgun yet Nunu?

    I was at St Ali down South Melbourne way, and talked to Mark. He said, get a heatgun and a large stainless dogbowl.

    The popper is a fantastic start for the new roaster, and undoutably the way to get into freshly roasted coffee. But the gun is definatly a best second step. Value for money its second to none.

    Second the "Dont delay" too.

  8. #8
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    Re:  A Step into the Unknown

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    I dont mind the idea of a heatgun roast, but the batch size is a bit too big for our purposes atm. I dont mind using the popper, and mines set up nicely for how often I use it. Our coffee consumption has gone down in recent weeks, with the weather warming up and such.

    One thing I dont like the HG/DB roast setup is the manual labour involved. I only stir my beans to cool them, as Im a bit too cheap to buy a more powerful fan that will do the job better. Everything is just sit back and watch, after about 30 seconds of shaking.



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