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Thread: How to develop a roasting profile based on taste?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    How to develop a roasting profile based on taste?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I have been googling a bit, and looking around here but for the life of me I cannot find a good online guide for developing roasting profiles based on taste.

    If one does a search for this there are floods of information about the difference between lighter and darker roasts often mistakenly described as roast profiles. Imo this doesnt describe a roast profile but roast degree.

    The other problem I have come across in my search is that much of the information out there is specific to home roasters that have limited control and limited information apart from the sensory. So development of roasting profiles is only as complex as debating how fast to ramp to first crack, and the ramp between first and second crack as these are the most obvious signals.(proffesionals dont tend to comment)

    I am hoping that as a group we can come to some conclusions about the general effect slowing down or speeding up the temperature curve at different stages of the roast can have on specific characteristics of coffee flavour.
    I am hoping we can be a bit more scientific.

    Questions I have are regarding impact on taste:
    -Dropping into a hot roaster vs cold roaster. *
    -Drying cycle vs steady ramp to 150c
    -time - 150c (green to yellow)
    -time from 150 -180 (yellow to brown)
    -time from 180-200 (brown to first crack)
    -time from 200-210(start to finish of first crack)
    -time from 210-218(end of first crack to finish start of second)
    -Impact of ramping the temperate just before the onset of second crack.

    Also the impact of airflow over the entirity roast or any of the above stages. (I have noticed professional roasters adjusting airflow mid roast)

    I am not looking for guides or ideas on what ideal timing is as I think that can be too specific to a particulr stlyle of roaster or variety of coffee or individual taste. Also there is heaps of information out there on that kind of thing. What I am really looking for is opinion on how ramping or slowing the above factors might affects flavors like: grassiness, woodyness, sugers, fruit, caramel, acidity etc etc

    If no one responds this then ill come back in a couple of years but hopefully we can share some good info *:)

    Hopefully with all that in mind you know what kind of education Im looking for. *;) If you think the questions im asking are wrong, or that there are other questions that I should be asking feel free to tell me what you think. *:)

    Otherwise if anyone has any resources they can point me towards on this kind of thing it would be very much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    Re: How to develop a roasting profile based on taste?

    Quote Originally Posted by 7860656570614A78747B2322150 link=1255766813/0#0 date=1255766813
    Questions I have are regarding impact on taste:
    -Dropping into a hot roaster vs cold roaster. *
    -Drying cycle vs steady ramp to 150c
    -time - 150c (green to yellow)
    -time from 150 -180 (yellow to brown)
    -time from 180-200 (brown to first crack)
    -time from 200-210(start to finish of first crack)
    -time from 210-218(end of first crack to finish start of second)
    -Impact of ramping the temperate just before the onset of second crack.
    Hi muppet,

    Ive played with a few of these variables, but given the vast taste differences between origins, between years, and between roast degrees; and the limited twiddling available EASILY with my Gene Café, I couldnt make head nor tail of anything.

    I have about 15 different beans in the cupboard and Id get awfully bored doing the same bean for months, and trying to get some repeatability into my roasts--so I dont.

    At the moment Im satisfied with an 11-13 ramp to first crack and a 5-7 minute first to second crack, and cool.

    Good luck with your research.

    Greg

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    16

    Re: How to develop a roasting profile based on taste?

    Hi muppet
    Have a read of the threads on the site below.
    http://www.coffeed.com/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=2286.

    Tony

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    437

    Re: How to develop a roasting profile based on taste?

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    First Qualifier: I have a corretto, used it for about a year, done around 25 single origins, roast 3 times a week average.

    -Dropping into a hot roaster vs cold roaster: little impact due to next question; except my BM gets too hot to run one after another. Needs a little cool down but not by much.
    -Drying cycle vs steady ramp to 150c: I use drying cycle by which I assume you mean the standard breadmaker slow knead for around 6 minutes (heat gun on low around 60*c) before the fast knead kicks in and the heat-gun is applied at full (600*c) at which time I start my stop-clock to time the roast.
    -time - 150c (green to yellow): I like to average yellowing by around 5 minutes into full-heat phase. I allow anywhere up to 6 mins before increasing heat if needed to speed up the general roast. Much longer to yellowing and my roast will get outside my preference/tolerance at the other end and tend to be more baked than roasted.
    -time from 150 -180 (yellow to brown): not a relevant indicator for my roasts.
    -time from 180-200 (brown to first crack) from yellow to first crack I generally allow the bean to do what it wants to, as the heat vs time check was done back in the green to yellow phase. With one bean I have found it worthwhile extending this phase considerably.
    -time from 200-210(start to finish of first crack): in this phase I tweak the most, through experience with the bean and gut feel. If the yellow to first crack was a little quicker than I expected due to a high ambient temperature in my backyard, I ramp back the heat to a level I know will still reach second but with a minute added on to lengthen the roast.
    -time from 210-218(end of first crack to finish start of second): these can roll together. Only some beans have definite starts of second. Very little, if any, tweaking done at this stage, usually in a last ditch effort to save a roast that went completely against expectations.
    -Impact of ramping the temperate just before the onset of second crack. Never so far. Ahh, confused as to why I would like to hurry up second crack unless it was a last ditch effort of a strange roast.
    Also the impact of airflow over the entirity roast or any of the above stages. Airflow can be adjusted in corretto setup with the fan cooling the heat gun in an open-top scenario. It does impact on the roast. I have my fan at a consistent location at a consistent distance, at the same speed the whole roast in order to keep the temperatures down in the pan at a set level. More due to the limitation of the heatguns ability to operate more than anything.

    Impact on taste: not qualifiable or quantifiable any more than I have above without taking a separate set of notes for each roast all over again with those in mind, however this process has developed based on my tastebuds... and only on my tastebuds.

    You asked for information... you got it. ;) Hope it helps.



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