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Thread: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

  1. #1
    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all,

    A friend of mine has made a mistake when roasting his coffee beans, he didnt realise he needed to remove the pulp and dry the beans first.

    There is no doubting that he has made a mistake and I am sure feels terrible about it so if we could keep this to constructive comments rather than "OMG what a moron" I would appreciate it :)

    Can they be saved?

    Here is his story
    --------------------------------------------

    I picked my first crop today (about 40 beans) from my long-suffering coffee bush, which has been moved three times over six years as we changed houses.
    The beans were looking very burgundy and a couple were going black so I figured it was time to pick them.
    Then what? I consulted Wikipedia, which recommended roasting for up to 20 minutes at 200 rising to 240 degrees. So theyre in the oven right now, being stirred every five minutes.
    Anyone done this? How did it go?

    So, after 20 mins at 200 I took them out to cool, but the Navigator reckoned they werent cooked so, like a good husband, I did what I was told and put the back in the oven to cook some more...



    Took them out after 35 mins, when they started cracking. Look good. Now to work out how to crack and grind them... Any clues?

    -------------------------------

  2. #2
    A_M
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 5254434852554D4F260 link=1259535252/0#0 date=1259535252
    Hi all,

    A friend of mine has made a mistake when roasting his coffee beans, he didnt realise he needed to remove the pulp and dry the beans first.

    There is no doubting that he has made a mistake and I am sure feels terrible about it so if we could keep this to constructive comments rather than "OMG what a moron" I would appreciate it :)

    Can they be saved?

    Here is his story
    --------------------------------------------

    I picked my first crop today (about 40 beans) from my long-suffering coffee bush, which has been moved three times over six years as we changed houses.
    The beans were looking very burgundy and a couple were going black so I figured it was time to pick them.
    Then what? I consulted Wikipedia, which recommended roasting for up to 20 minutes at 200 rising to 240 degrees. So theyre in the oven right now, being stirred every five minutes.
    Anyone done this? How did it go?

    So, after 20 mins at 200 I took them out to cool, but the Navigator reckoned they werent cooked so, like a good husband, I did what I was told and put the back in the oven to cook some more...



    Took them out after 35 mins, when they started cracking. Look good. Now to work out how to crack and grind them... Any clues?

    -------------------------------

    Unaware of any one who has had much at a double roast.. ( Oven looks like it needs a GOOD CLEAN... )

    Once the process starts... If ya end up; for what ever reason, breaking the cycle.. The usual outcome is the BIN..

    They were coffee cherries not coffee beans... But whats in a few words *:D

    Ya could always now take the pulp off and try them... Would be interesting to hear what ya find..

    PEBKAC

  3. #3
    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 012E2725320D212E2127252D252E34400 link=1259535252/1#1 date=1259542907
    Unaware of any one who has had much at a double roast.. *( Oven looks like it needs a GOOD CLEAN... )

    Once the process starts... If ya end up; for what ever reason, breaking the cycle.. The usual outcome is the BIN..

    They were coffee cherries not coffee beans... But whats in a few words *:D

    Ya could always now take the pulp off and try them... Would be interesting to hear what ya find..

    PEBKAC
    Thanks AM, I was sort of hoping that for his sake he had come across an ancient way of preparing coffee that was seldom practised but gave good results :(

    Not sure why he didnt do more research before he threw them in the oven but he will know better next year. You can tell from the terminology he has used that his coffee knowledge is only a little above the international roast level ;)

  4. #4
    A_M
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 6365727963647C7E170 link=1259535252/2#2 date=1259545966
    Quote Originally Posted by 012E2725320D212E2127252D252E34400 link=1259535252/1#1 date=1259542907
    Unaware of any one who has had much at a double roast.. *( Oven looks like it needs a GOOD CLEAN... )

    Once the process starts... If ya end up; for what ever reason, breaking the cycle.. The usual outcome is the BIN..

    They were coffee cherries not coffee beans... But whats in a few words *:D

    Ya could always now take the pulp off and try them... Would be interesting to hear what ya find..

    PEBKAC
    Thanks AM, I was sort of hoping that for his sake he had come across an ancient way of preparing coffee that was seldom practised but gave good results :(

    Not sure why he didnt do more research before he threw them in the oven but he will know better next year. You can tell from the terminology he has used that his coffee knowledge is only a little above the international roast level ;)
    Some one may know something and I am sure that some one at some stage has done the same..

    PS... 40 beans will not even make nescaffe ;) I think there is a post some where as to about 70 ;D for a shot...

  5. #5
    Senior Member Coffee2Di4's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Pete showed me this one last night, Trenski, and told me I had to save the guy but, after a darb or two out in the heat of the evening, it slipped my mind.

    Next thing, he was telling me that the guy had roasted his beans, whole! :o

    What a waste... :(

    If no one else comes up with another better suggestion, my recommendation would be to pulp them now, see what the inside is like, just in case the cherry managed to protect the bean inside, and take it from there. If they are a goner, at least hell know what not to do next year but, you never know, they may still be okay! A good experimentation, if nothing else!

    Cheers
    Di

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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    OMG what a moron

    sorry, someone had to...

  7. #7
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Please find out for me what precautions he took in moving the coffee trees.
    Mine might have to move.

  8. #8
    A_M
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 4C706D767C7D6A7F777C180 link=1259535252/6#6 date=1259578909
    Please find out for me what precautions he took in moving the coffee trees.
    Mine might have to move.
    May or may not be what ya looking for... But I have just tiped and planted two..

    Are you ready to plant?
    When you are ready for planting it is important to dig a 5 gallon hole for the one gallon bag that holds your tree. Once your hole has been dug sprinkle about 6 inches of loose dirt back in, spread a cup full of the blended coffee planting fertilizer (BEOF1) on the loose dirt and cover again with another 6 inches of soil. You should now have enough space in the hole from bottom to top to comfortably fit the one gallon coffee start. The loose dirt and layering in the fertilizer is important as it will allow the root system of the tree both growing room and air to breath.

    After you have prepared your holes remove the tree from its bag being careful not to disturb or rip the roots. Once the tree has been removed from the bag you must study the root system at the bottom of the tree. Very important... If you notice a large tap root on the bottom of your tree that has taken an obvious turn because it could not grow any further down because of the bag... cut it off. Donít worry... this will only help your tree not hurt it. You want the main tap root to grow straight down and not sideways so this will help establish healthy root growth for years to come. (A good general rule of thumb is to always remove a half an inch at the bottom of your root ball.)

    You are now ready to plant. Place the tree in the hole, cover with soil and water so the ground and your planting are sufficiently soaked. You are now ready to top your tree. Once again you will ask yourself, will this hurt my new tree? The answer is no. Your trees should be on average forty seven inches high at the time of planting and healthy enough to sustain this topping technique. In the end your trees will produce at least twice as much coffee utilizing this method. At a height of twenty six inches above the base of the tree make your cut above at least two sets of branches and leave one inch of stalk above the top set of branches when you make this cut. Be sure to leave as much stalk as possible above the last healthy branches you are leaving as this will deter pests and fungus from attacking your new laterals.

    What this will do is allow your tree to actually grow four trees in one. The four laterals you leave will all eventually turn upwards to support normal tree growth. Once again... this is important if you want to maximize the amount of coffee one tree can produce as well as making it easier to pick.

  9. #9
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Thanks AM.
    May be useful in future but for now Im looking for the process to remove them from the ground before moving.

  10. #10
    A_M
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 0E322F343E3F283D353E5A0 link=1259535252/8#8 date=1259612824
    Thanks AM.
    May be useful in future but for now Im looking for the process to remove them from the ground before moving.
    Bloody HARD WORK

    Like any tree / shrub.. You must get that root ball.

  11. #11
    brett230873
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 69464F4D5A654946494F4D454D465C280 link=1259535252/7#7 date=1259582858
    Are you ready to plant?
    When you are ready for planting it is important to dig a 5 gallon hole for the one gallon bag that holds your tree. Once your hole has been dug sprinkle about 6 inches of loose dirt back in, spread a cup full of the blended coffee planting fertilizer (BEOF1) on the loose dirt and cover again with another 6 inches of soil. You should now have enough space in the hole from bottom to top to comfortably fit the one gallon coffee start. The loose dirt and layering in the fertilizer is important as it will allow the root system of the tree both growing room and air to breath.

    After you have prepared your holes remove the tree from its bag being careful not to disturb or rip the roots. Once the tree has been removed from the bag you must study the root system at the bottom of the tree. Very important... If you notice a large tap root on the bottom of your tree that has taken an obvious turn because it could not grow any further down because of the bag... cut it off. Donít worry... this will only help your tree not hurt it. You want the main tap root to grow straight down and not sideways so this will help establish healthy root growth for years to come. (A good general rule of thumb is to always remove a half an inch at the bottom of your root ball.)

    You are now ready to plant. Place the tree in the hole, cover with soil and water so the ground and your planting are sufficiently soaked. You are now ready to top your tree. Once again you will ask yourself, will this hurt my new tree? The answer is no. Your trees should be on average forty seven inches high at the time of planting and healthy enough to sustain this topping technique. In the end your trees will produce at least twice as much coffee utilizing this method. At a height of twenty six inches above the base of the tree make your cut above at least two sets of branches and leave one inch of stalk above the top set of branches when you make this cut. Be sure to leave as much stalk as possible above the last healthy branches you are leaving as this will deter pests and fungus from attacking your new laterals.

    What this will do is allow your tree to actually grow four trees in one. The four laterals you leave will all eventually turn upwards to support normal tree growth. Once again... this is important if you want to maximize the amount of coffee one tree can produce as well as making it easier to pick.
    This post is as insightful as is it clear! Thank you for sharing this information. I now have another project for the holidays!

  12. #12
    A_M
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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Quote Originally Posted by 6A7A6D7C7C3A3B38303F3B080 link=1259535252/10#10 date=1259619340
    This post is as insightful as is it clear! *Thank you for sharing this information. *I now have another project for the holidays!
    Yea... I am dealing with MP and over x-mas hope to get to HERE

    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1233813862

    I may have to Ask Kees van Rijssen what else ya can or can NOT do with teh Berries

    Come next year... May be able to learn and experience a little more as to what and how to deal with Coffee Berries.



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    Re: Roasting the whole coffee fruit

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by 4741565D4740585A330 link=1259535252/0#0 date=1259535252
    A friend of mine has made a mistake when roasting his coffee beans, he didnt realise he needed to remove the pulp and dry the beans first.
    im coming into this a bit late, but there are some traditions where coffee is dried in the cherry and then roasted as is. ive had it - in northern kenya where people get their ideas about coffee from ethiopia, but it doesnt taste like coffee as we know it.
    there are some descriptions of home-processing coffee in the thread growing coffee.



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