Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Roaster conundrum!

  1. #1
    Junior Member KittyJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tamborine, QLD
    Posts
    8

    Roaster conundrum!

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Im currently researching for my first roaster. I have 17 fruiting coffee trees which will be ready for harvest within the next three months or so.

    I figured now would be a good time to start looking for a roaster. So far I have found stockists of a Has Garanti 1 kilo and 5 kilo capacity roaster for $6,900 and $17,500 respectively.

    For a first roaster I am worried that this is too expensive, though I am not averse to the idea of a second hand roaster (unless there is significant risk of damage to a used roaster in dismantling, travel and re-assembling).

    There is also a HOTTOP KN-8828B 300g capacity roaster in a review forum for $1650. This is much more in line with my budget, however with this one I worry about how much of a degradation of roasting quality there is when compared with the light commercial type machines.

    Either way, its an expensive decision so I was hoping to get some insight from you wonderful coffee snobs - as I know the advice I will get from every supplier is that theirs are the best and most cost effective.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated* ;D

  2. #2
    Senior Member dski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    206

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Quote Originally Posted by 41637E7E734065646F790A0 link=1326252964/0#0 date=1326252964
    Im currently researching for my first roaster. I have 17 fruiting coffee trees which will be ready for harvest within the next three months or so.

    I figured now would be a good time to start looking for a roaster.

    What is your intended production level - just for yourself and friends, or commercial quantities?

    Where are you growing the beans, just out of curiousity?

  3. #3
    Junior Member KittyJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tamborine, QLD
    Posts
    8

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Hi :)

    Its a hobby farm - at the moment - in Tamborine. 19 in the ground and 17 more seedlings that are just shy of one year old. Theres a view to maybe opening a cafe one day but at the moment its more about learning and experiencing.

    So I would be keen for a good roaster (Ive read about the bread maker and popcorn popper option as well as stove top roasting but am not as keen on those), Im looking for something that I can use to make commercial quality coffee, but I imagine I wouldnt be selling anything for a while. (Unless I got it nailed right away!)

  4. #4
    TC
    TC is offline
    .
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    14,665

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Hello Kitty and welcome,

    By my reckoning, your crop will possibly be 5-10kg assuming youre managing ripening so that you can pick everything at once.

    Your next challenge will be to get the beans pulped and ready to roast. How are you planning to do that? You will also have QC issues to manage so as to produce green beans of consistent size and quality.

    As for roasting, you do get what you pay for. If you want a commercial roaster, you will need to pay for one and I can assure you that the cost of the roaster will be but one component of a commercial setup and operation. Youd want to have a whole lot more than the cost of the roaster to comply with the relevant regulations and then produce packaged product. You have not outlined what you will be doing with the roaster for the other 364 days of the year though as your crop will be roasted on day one.* :-?

    On the other hand if your endeavour is as a hobby, you can purchase or build a hobby roaster in the knowledge that you will have a whole lot of fun but are unlikely to produce roasted beans of commercial quality. Do your homework. There is a whole heap of poor Australian coffee around and I have sampled many more decidedly average samples than good ones.

    Good luck either way. ;)

  5. #5
    Caffeine Junky
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,103

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Likes others have already said, its unclear what the longer term objectives are.* It sounds like you want to make it a hobby to start with but also have the potential to become a commercial venture.

    From what cjn has said even with 36 productive trees you would not be producing enough coffee to provide the needs of a cafe.* Never mind the processing and quality issues he also mentioned.

    You could try getting a local commercial roaster to roast your beans for you, but then what are you going to do with 20kg of roasted coffee beans (which should ideally be consumed within 1-3 weeks of roasting)?

    Personally Id start with a domestic roaster (there are cheaper options than the Hottop, although these are very good home roasters).* That way if you realise what you had first envisioned is not practical then you would have only lost a few hundred dollars at most. On the other hand if things do go well you can then go ahead and spend big bucks on a commercial roaster.

    You can sell the smaller roaster or keep it for test roasts. I know a very good roaster in Adelaide who used to use the Genecafe as his sample roaster.


  6. #6
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    3,157

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Hi Kitty, have a talk to Mark at Coffee Roasters Australia, located on the Gold Coast not too far from you, he should be able to steer you in the right direction as to type of roasting equipment that would suit your needs :) :)

  7. #7
    Junior Member KittyJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tamborine, QLD
    Posts
    8

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Thanks everyone,

    Great ideas, my preferred choice at the moment for preparing the beans will be the soak method (hand picking and pulping as well as I wont have that much to do initially), though Im still researching the best way to ensure the materials I use for the tub will be mould resistant and safe for consumption. (Im keen to build a two or three part tub that will separate the flesh from the beans easily, allowing me to scoop out flesh and floaters from the top section leaving the beans in the middle and the particulate matter to fall to the bottom - also if I manage to make the tub in sections, I can lift them out, discard the waste, then change the water before reassembling the tub).

    I would then have drying mesh racks that I can lay the beans out flat, but have it raised for better air circulation and so that the hull can crack open and fall through.

    I had also figured on freezing the beans green (or vacuum sealing perhaps?) and roasting them as I need them. That way I can learn roasting technique without wasting my crop.

    Thankyou for the tip on the Genecafe, Caffeine Junky, and Greenman I will definitely have a chat with Mark.

    I also have room on the property for a couple hundred trees, though I dont want to expand too rapidly. Id like it to expand as my skills increase so that I am able to cope. This is why Im germinating around 20 trees each time. I skipped a couple of years while I was setting up the property, but will aim to germinate roughly 20 trees each year.

    I also like the idea of encouraging Australian growers, so if in the event of a future cafe, I would like to seek coffee from other sources to compliment my own. I could have a coffee showcase!!

    You are all such a wonderful help and inspiration already* :D

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bosco_Lever's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    QLD
    Posts
    442

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Quote Originally Posted by 0624393934072223283E4D0 link=1326252964/2#2 date=1326254314
    Its a hobby farm - at the moment - in Tamborine.
    I gather you mean Mt Tamborine, near the Gold Coast?
    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1233813862

    Read this review and pay your "neighbour" a visit.
    Kees will be a wealth of information.

    Good Luck in your endeavours.

  9. #9
    Junior Member KittyJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tamborine, QLD
    Posts
    8

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Yes nearly Mt Tamborine. My property is past the Tamborine Valley and heading up (I was fortunate to find a very steep part of Tamborine to buy in) but its not quite Mt Tamborine. Another ten minutes drive from my house and it is!

    Yes, Kees is a wonderful source of information and fantastic coffee! Another inspiration :)

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,077

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    you wont need to freeze green beans, it also doesnt sound that pleasant for the bean :o

    Given your KG haul will be relatively small, you are sure to use them up within a 3 year window of them staying fresh

  11. #11
    Junior Member KittyJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tamborine, QLD
    Posts
    8

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Freezing not necessary? I had wondered that. I visited the Daily Grind in upstate New York (Albany) earlier this year and he had big hessian bags of green beans stacked along the walls and a few open for show. It looked gorgeous, and the coffee there was superb, so I had wondered if maybe the freezing of green beans was maybe a bit OTT.

    Perhaps even damages the bean being frozen and then thawed?

    Im definitely keen to only roast as I need it.

  12. #12
    Site Sponsor coffee_machinist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    683

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Mark Prince has covered freezing green coffee in one of his earlier podcasts, might be worth a listen - sorry I cant remember his exact conclusions but its not all bad news.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    179

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Hi Kitty,

    Welcome from me as well. While I have no knowledge of commercial roasters it seems to me your first priority is to learn the basics of roasting and on top of that, with a small crop at first, dont discount using and learning with one of the cheaper options first. As someone just said to me, using your 5 senses comes first before any sort of machine/technical assistance.

    Id also suggest you do a fair bit of experimenting with other peoples green beans before you get to your precious first crop! :)

    KK of KKTO fame is also just up the road from you and could set you up and also be a great help in your endeavour ... and no, Im not being paid to say that! ;)

  14. #14
    Senior Member dski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    206

    Re: Roaster conundrum!

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by 203B31390D303D3C36520 link=1326252964/11#11 date=1326284822
    Mark Prince has covered freezing green coffee in one of his earlier podcasts
    Thanks for that tip Rick - interesting series.



Similar Threads

  1. The Summer Conundrum… advice sought!
    By DesigningByCoffee in forum Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 16th July 2015, 09:44 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 19th December 2012, 08:49 AM
  3. 500 gram gas powered sample roaster / home roaster
    By coffee_mogul in forum Roasters
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 14th June 2008, 11:53 AM
  4. Costalumbian Blend Conundrum
    By Corretto in forum Blending Room
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 6th September 2006, 06:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •