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  1. #201
    Senior Member WhatEverBeansNecessary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iPatch View Post
    I did a 500g batch of Wahgi, I didn't think much about that to be honest. I'll adjust respective to batch size on the next roast. Should I be aiming for around the 19 min mark?

    I'm still trying to get my head around all the terms used in describing all the different taste and textures, but what I got from this roast was a slightly bitter espresso, didn't really have a strong "coffee" flavour with a raw grassy taste (acidity?). I hope that makes some sense. Its not unpleasant at all, but I know it can be vastly improved. In milk it tastes amazing, its slightly sweet with little hints of chocolate.
    DBC is the gun with a correto, so he will give you the best tips for sure. But it can be hard judging coffee solely from pulling an espresso shot as the variables in your machine/grinder/workflow can change the taste considerably. Cupping is an interesting technique that professional coffee tasters use where (very simply put) they use water heated to exactly to a certain temp, add exactly x grams of coffee and brew for exactly x mins in a cup. They then taste using this method as it is standard prep without the influences of machines etc. It's a great way to fine tune roasting techniques and get to know flavours of coffee better.

    Having said all that, many of us roast for a specific prep technique (like espresso or filter etc) and the results form that technique should guide you the most.

    Where I am going with all this - experiment, experiment, experiment! Smaller batch sizes means you will go through the coffee faster and more room in a bag to test lighter, darker, longer, shorter, hotter, cooler etc roasts and see what works best for your style of coffee/taste buds.
    Don't get super hung up about should it be 19 min or 22 min, or exactly x degrees at first crack (particularly early on) - just experiment and make notes on what you liked more and noticed was different from the previous roast. Then adjust your next roast to bring those flavours out, or leave them behind
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  2. #202
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iPatch View Post
    I did a 500g batch of Wahgi, I didn't think much about that to be honest. I'll adjust respective to batch size on the next roast. Should I be aiming for around the 19 min mark? I'm still trying to get my head around all the terms used in describing all the different taste and textures, but what I got from this roast was a slightly bitter espresso, didn't really have a strong "coffee" flavour with a raw grassy taste (acidity?). I hope that makes some sense. Its not unpleasant at all, but I know it can be vastly improved. In milk it tastes amazing, its slightly sweet with little hints of chocolate.
    Your tasting thoughts, even if not really well educated, will be the most useful ways to gather feedback from the community here. But first things first - it tastes great in milk! That's a great start! If you like it – you've won!

    Now, a few thoughts as to your other notes to ponder…

    If your roast tastes chocolately in milk but is a little bitter as espresso, that is most likely your roast depth (how dark you took the roast). This can always be a little bit of a trade off. To get strong, chocolately coffee you sometimes need to go a little darker (just into second crack), but this will also change the flavour of black coffee. Depends what you prefer to drink. Are you aiming for ideal espresso? You might need to settle for slightly milder white coffee by dropping you beans 1-2° earlier (yes - only that little!).
    But changing beans can help -*I've always found that a slow, even lightly roasted Brazil gives a good hit of cocoa without having to go dark The Waghi is a beautiful, caramelly bean, that likes just before the start of second crack IMHO – you treat it gently you will be rewarded with caramel milkshake flavours, without the need for sugar

    Grassy taste? I have heard that cupping description, but never really experienced that myself. Allowing the beans to age a bit more may help.
    But that's doesn't really sound like acidity. A too-fast roast will give a front-of-the-tongue, licking a lemon flavour. A good acidity (as you gently slow that roast time down) will give a nice, back-of-the-throat zing like the final bite into a sherbet lemon. And to further complicate things – some beans have more or less acidity naturally. I think Waghi is pretty mild.

    Your raw/grassy/lack of flavour may be the flatness I mentioned before - not a lot happening flavour-wise. I would think this could be (combined with your profile) the sign the roast has been a little bit long and has muted everything.

    Idea for next time – use the same beans, try to speed up the time to first crack by 1-2 mins, keep first crack-second crack technique/time the same, but drop 1-2° earlier.

    Any let us know what happens!
    Matt

  3. #203
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Great explanation Matt...

    Mal.

  4. #204
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Interesting observations people!

    I've been roasting with a Coretto for around 10 years, wouldn't call myself a guru and certainly am not a record keeper or profile follower, having said that, I roast 725 grams of green beans per week, they always turn out pretty well.

    Although I don't approach the task with the science other Coretto roasters do, I've found there are constants with every batch, will list them below, comments positive or negative welcome.

    I always start the process cold, varying the heat gun maximum temp to suit the weather, cooler months I start @ approx 550°C, summer around 500°C, I use a Victor DMM to monitor temp with the probe in the bottom centre of the bean mass just above the agitator.

    Dump the beans in, start agitation, turn on heat gun, I'm looking for first crack at around <>14 minutes, it invariably occurs at spot on 200°C, now on my 3rd DMM, same result with each.

    Depending on how the roast is progressing I may drop the heat at this point to maintain an even and steady rise in temp, I'm aiming for second crack (almost always around 225°C) 5 mins after FC, for a total roast time of 19 minutes.

    As DBC remarked it's important to have your ducks in a row when you hit the target, remove the heat source and get the beans transferred to the cooler as quickly as possible.

    Yep! I treat all of my roasts in a similar manner, as you may have guessed, I prefer the more developed chocolatey flavours (Italian style) hence my darker roasts, lighter roasts simply don't do it for me.

    Hope my jumbled thoughts may be of some use to aspiring roasters

  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhatEverBeansNecessary View Post
    Where I am going with all this - experiment, experiment, experiment! Smaller batch sizes means you will go through the coffee faster and more room in a bag to test lighter, darker, longer, shorter, hotter, cooler etc roasts and see what works best for your style of coffee/taste buds.
    Don't get super hung up about should it be 19 min or 22 min, or exactly x degrees at first crack (particularly early on) - just experiment and make notes on what you liked more and noticed was different from the previous roast. Then adjust your next roast to bring those flavours out, or leave them behind
    This is really easy to forget, great advice. I think I do need to take a little step back and not get so hung up on the specific details, I'll be taking a more experimental approach in my next roasts for sure, going with smaller batches and testing different methods of roasting. To start off I think I was trying to mimic a tried and tested method at first, use that as my foundation, and work from there.

    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    Your tasting thoughts, even if not really well educated, will be the most useful ways to gather feedback from the community here. But first things first - it tastes great in milk! That's a great start! If you like it – you've won!

    Now, a few thoughts as to your other notes to ponder…

    If your roast tastes chocolately in milk but is a little bitter as espresso, that is most likely your roast depth (how dark you took the roast). This can always be a little bit of a trade off. To get strong, chocolately coffee you sometimes need to go a little darker (just into second crack), but this will also change the flavour of black coffee. Depends what you prefer to drink. Are you aiming for ideal espresso? You might need to settle for slightly milder white coffee by dropping you beans 1-2° earlier (yes - only that little!).
    But changing beans can help -*I've always found that a slow, even lightly roasted Brazil gives a good hit of cocoa without having to go dark The Waghi is a beautiful, caramelly bean, that likes just before the start of second crack IMHO – you treat it gently you will be rewarded with caramel milkshake flavours, without the need for sugar

    Grassy taste? I have heard that cupping description, but never really experienced that myself. Allowing the beans to age a bit more may help.
    But that's doesn't really sound like acidity. A too-fast roast will give a front-of-the-tongue, licking a lemon flavour. A good acidity (as you gently slow that roast time down) will give a nice, back-of-the-throat zing like the final bite into a sherbet lemon. And to further complicate things – some beans have more or less acidity naturally. I think Waghi is pretty mild.

    Your raw/grassy/lack of flavour may be the flatness I mentioned before - not a lot happening flavour-wise. I would think this could be (combined with your profile) the sign the roast has been a little bit long and has muted everything.

    Idea for next time – use the same beans, try to speed up the time to first crack by 1-2 mins, keep first crack-second crack technique/time the same, but drop 1-2° earlier.

    Any let us know what happens!
    Matt
    So much useful info here. To be honest, I didn't know what I was my aim was with regards to which drink types I was roasting for. We drink mainly milk based, I'm the only one that likes a good espresso. The drink type is something I'll need to take into consideration next time.

    I have just placed a good sized greens order, so I'll have a lot of roast experimenting to keep me going the next few months with the different varieties.

    Thanks so much for the help, this is an amazing community, I'm blown away with the support offered to new members.

  6. #206
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iPatch View Post
    To start off I think I was trying to mimic a tried and tested method at first, use that as my foundation, and work from there.
    What better way to start! get the fundamentals down pat, then let the experiments begin.
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  7. #207
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    My procedure, these days, doesn't differ too much from yours Yelta, though I will play with profiles to some extent to make sure I'm getting what I want from the bean.

    Also don't enjoy overly light roasts even when targeting manual brew methods. The profiles I've been using lately are as "light" as I will ever go and is part dictated by the Corretto setup I have. The Breville 'Big Loaf' uses a shallow horizontal bread pan (with two paddles) so the air from the Heat Gun has to be carefully controlled so as not to scorch or 'tip' the beans, which would happen if I tried to accelerate the batches more than I currently do.

    Works out well for us though, as we all love the coffee that ends up in the cup...

    Mal.
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  8. #208
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    To be honest Mal, I think the one size fits all method I use works for me because I enjoy darker roasts, I imagine I would have to pay a little more attention if I were looking to roast for filter/drip coffee and the likes.

    PS I use a Breville single loaf bread maker, the bean mass is quite deep and the bean surface area is not large, the agitator seems to keep them turning over nicely, tipping or scorching has never been an issue.
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    Hello all, totally new here, stumbled across this site after searching for ways to roast coffee without going broke. My whole coffee obsession is new, actually, haven't owned my espresso machine for three months yet, been a popper-roaster for about a month, and now, with lots of inspiration from this thread, I've assembled/built a corretto roaster. Thank you so much, already! I've had one roasting session, resulting in 3 x 300 grams of green beans ending up 750 grams of rather dark roasted ones. I've stuck a cooking thermometer through the bread machine into the bucket, and from various profiles I've made a reference temperature chart. It didn't work out that well. The problem was much the same as with steering a supertanker (I guess...) that once I realised I was going off course, it was already too late for a soft change. All three times the temperature would after behaving well for a few minutes start climbing too steeply, I'd turn the heat down slightly, and then, when that didn't help, I'd panic and turn it down some more, until the RoR became a RoD. I hope that with more experience I'll be able to detect this in time, but - how do you foresee a roast going off course before it has really started to?
    Cheers - Leo
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  10. #210
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    Hello all, totally new here, stumbled across this site after searching for ways to roast coffee without going broke. My whole coffee obsession is new, actually, haven't owned my espresso machine for three months yet, been a popper-roaster for about a month, and now, with lots of inspiration from this thread, I've assembled/built a corretto roaster. Thank you so much, already! I've had one roasting session, resulting in 3 x 300 grams of green beans ending up 750 grams of rather dark roasted ones. I've stuck a cooking thermometer through the bread machine into the bucket, and from various profiles I've made a reference temperature chart. It didn't work out that well. The problem was much the same as with steering a supertanker (I guess...) that once I realised I was going off course, it was already too late for a soft change. All three times the temperature would after behaving well for a few minutes start climbing too steeply, I'd turn the heat down slightly, and then, when that didn't help, I'd panic and turn it down some more, until the RoR became a RoD. I hope that with more experience I'll be able to detect this in time, but - how do you foresee a roast going off course before it has really started to?
    Cheers - Leo
    Morning Knastoer, welcome to Coffee Snobs and Coretto roasting.

    Your key question seems to be "how do you foresee a roast going off course before it has really started to?" Experience is probably the best answer, however a few pointers and questions.

    300 grams is quite a small batch in a bread maker, the beans will heat quickly and I suspect be quite difficult to control, larger batches are easier to control, I work with batches of 750 grams green.

    Do you have a variable fan speed and heat control heat gun, makes life a lot easier.

    You need something a little more responsive than a household thermometer, I use a digital multi meter with a temp probe, there is also the Heat Snob, You need a device that is able to measure temp changes quickly and reasonably accurately so you can respond appropriately.

    A picture of your setup will help us advise you.

    Don't be disheartened, once you have your Coretto set up as you want it everything will fall into place.
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  11. #211
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Here's a pic of my setup, may give you some idea's.
    DSC_0278_1000x669.jpg

  12. #212
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    That pretty much matches my initial efforts with a corretto: maintaining a good profile and trying not to over compensate with heat gun adjustments. I solved it by investing in the DDM as Yelta mentioned but you should also run the software which will help you monitor the roast and allow you to track the temp changes more accurately.
    I drilled through the side of the bread maker and into the corner of the pan for thermocouple probe placement. The rest is experience and following the profiles of other CSers until you find what works well with you and your roasting kit.
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    Good morning Yelta, and thanks for your reply (in fact I should be off to bed, 01 in the morning here in Denmark). I'll try to clarify. Most importantly - I'm definitely not disheartened, this is going to be an adventure. :-)
    I'll post pictures of the setup, as soon as I'm allowed to. No fan, but the heat gun has a stepless controller. It is a cheap one, and the range is 80 - 600 degrees in three quarts of a round, so I guess a few mm's could mean a big change. The thermometer is the kind you stick into a piece of meat to monitor the core temperature, but maybe that's not quite good enough? I guess you're right about batch size and controllability, though I would've thought that with a smaller batch response would be quicker. Another thing - trying to mimic the reference temperatures, I heated the "roasting chamber" to about 200 degrees before putting in the beans. I think I read in a post that this particular roaster would pour in the beans before even turning on the heat. Is that an option?

    Again - thank you so much for your help.

    Leo

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    Thanks, flynnaus. Among the first hits of my DDM google search were Dave's Discount Motors and Deutsches Dampf-Lokomotiv Museum, and nothing that looked like it belonged in coffee roasting. :-)
    I suppose it's the multimeter? I think I've got the probe of the cooking-thing in quite a fine position in the pan, but if it's just too slow it won't be any good - it might even be worse than nothing, I guess.

  15. #215
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    The thermometer is the kind you stick into a piece of meat to monitor the core temperature, but maybe that's not quite good enough? I guess you're right about batch size and controllability, though I would've thought that with a smaller batch response would be quicker. Another thing - trying to mimic the reference temperatures, I heated the "roasting chamber" to about 200 degrees before putting in the beans. I think I read in a post that this particular roaster would pour in the beans before even turning on the heat. Is that an option?
    Leo
    A meat thermometer is not suitable.

    Your right a smaller batch will react to temp changes more rapidly, that's the problem, it can happen too quickly to catch, by the time you react the damage has been done.

    I start all of my roasts from cold.

  16. #216
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Similar to this with a temp probe.

  17. #217
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    The DMM (Digital Multi-Meter) referred to has been superseded by the HeatSnob.


    Java "Graph it!" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  18. #218
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    The DMM (Digital Multi-Meter) referred to has been superseded by the HeatSnob.


    Java "Graph it!" phile
    True, however my preference is for the simplicity of the multi meter.

    I ran profiling software in the early days of roasting and quickly found being hooked up to a PC was a layer of complexity I didn't want or need, obviously most don't share my opinion, I'm simply explaining what has worked very well for me weekly for 10 years.

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    Ok! Feel that I'm already getting somewhere. Starting from cold next time. Until I get a proper thermo probe, maybe I should just refrain from monitoring the temperature...

    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    A meat thermometer is not suitable.

    Your right a smaller batch will react to temp changes more rapidly, that's the problem, it can happen too quickly to catch, by the time you react the damage has been done.

    I start all of my roasts from cold.

  20. #220
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    Thanks, flynnaus. Among the first hits of my DDM google search were Dave's Discount Motors and Deutsches Dampf-Lokomotiv Museum, and nothing that looked like it belonged in coffee roasting. :-)
    I suppose it's the multimeter? I think I've got the probe of the cooking-thing in quite a fine position in the pan, but if it's just too slow it won't be any good - it might even be worse than nothing, I guess.
    .

    Sorry, yes that was meant to be DMM: digital multimeter. A reasonable to good quality thermocouple and multimeter will measure more accurately than your cooking thermometer which is designed to show the temp at a point in time rather than over a period in time. If you can't get roast monitoring software, you can plot on graph paper. Do work with a good sized bean mass as this will help to smooth out temperature changes. If
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    Thank you, kind people. Off to dream about coffee roasting now - if my caffeine soaked mind will let me.

  22. #222
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    Ok! Feel that I'm already getting somewhere. Starting from cold next time. Until I get a proper thermo probe, maybe I should just refrain from monitoring the temperature...
    It can be done Leo, however does require some experience.

    First crack is easy to identify, second crack can be a bit tricky, by the time you realise your at second crack and react it's often too late and you end up with an over roasted batch, a temp monitoring device particularly in the early days of roasting is important, it will give you a lot more control over the process.

    Anything darker than Vienna light French in the below pic is too dark for most palates.

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  23. #223
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    I like the description of the last one!! Hilarious!!

    Cheers

  24. #224
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by artman View Post
    I like the description of the last one!! Hilarious!!

    Cheers
    Yep! if yer headed into this territory best have a loaded fire extinguisher on yer hip pilgrim.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    A picture of your setup will help us advise you.
    Ok. Permission granted! This is how the roaster, the cooler and my first batch (yergicheffe) look. I teach in a school so I have access to woodworking facilities there. Thus the large exhaust tube for the cooler. Amazingly, it only took about 20 sec to cool down the beans. For the roaster, I have made a bottomless box out of thin aluminum sheet that goes over the pan for insulation and can be removed quickly when it's time to drop the beans. Despite the problems mentioned earlier, I thought the outcome looked pretty good, though a bit too dark. I've just had a taste of the now three days old roast - and they are definitely too dark. Not unpleasant for my espresso, but they've been robbed of that delicious Yergicheffe-taste. Next time I roast, I'll see if I can sneak into the physics-lab and borrow a multimeter/data logger, though...you never know where that probe has been. Kids...
    RisterCS.JPGCoolerCS.JPGbønnerCS.JPG

  26. #226
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    Welcome Leo...

    Even though that batch may be a little dark, it is still a great first time effort. My first effort didn't look anything close to resembling yours, much darker...

    Love the heat-gun stand too, very nifty.
    Can't really add anything to what Yelta and others have already contributed but would like to emphasise how important it is to keep records of each roast batch when you're first starting out, including feedback, such as the results in the cup. Once you get a much better handle on the whole process, you can then decide how detailed your record keeping should be, as a reference for future batches of the same bean or blend. It's a great hobby and heaps of fun....

    Mal.
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    Thanks a lot, Mal! I'm enjoying my new hobby immensely. And so glad that I found this place, where people are just so helpful and friendly. It's a great pleasure!
    Leo

  28. #228
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    Ok. Permission granted! This is how the roaster, the cooler and my first batch (yergicheffe) look. I teach in a school so I have access to woodworking facilities there. Thus the large exhaust tube for the cooler. Amazingly, it only took about 20 sec to cool down the beans. For the roaster, I have made a bottomless box out of thin aluminum sheet that goes over the pan for insulation and can be removed quickly when it's time to drop the beans. Despite the problems mentioned earlier, I thought the outcome looked pretty good, though a bit too dark. I've just had a taste of the now three days old roast - and they are definitely too dark. Not unpleasant for my espresso, but they've been robbed of that delicious Yergicheffe-taste. Next time I roast, I'll see if I can sneak into the physics-lab and borrow a multimeter/data logger, though...you never know where that probe has been. Kids...
    Looks like a very workable set up to me Leo.

    As Dimal remarked, your first roast looks pretty good, yes, perhaps a little dark but I suspect still very drinkable.

    The only obvious change I would make would be the addition of a DMM, this will give you a lot more control over the roast as well as telling you exactly where you are in the process.

    As a matter of interest were you able to identify first crack? it usually occurs within a couple of degree's of the same temp every roast, with my set up it's pretty well spot on 200°C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Looks like a very workable set up to me Leo.

    As Dimal remarked, your first roast looks pretty good, yes, perhaps a little dark but I suspect still very drinkable.

    The only obvious change I would make would be the addition of a DMM, this will give you a lot more control over the roast as well as telling you exactly where you are in the process.

    As a matter of interest were you able to identify first crack? it usually occurs within a couple of degree's of the same temp every roast, with my set up it's pretty well spot on 200°C.
    Thanks again for your interest, Yelta. First crack was almost violent, no doubt because the temperature was climbing too rapidly. The thermometer read about 180°C when it started. Same the other two times. All three times this was where I desperately was trying to regain control over the temperature without much luck. I need a DMM. I quite fancy the Heatsnob thing, but I hate the idea that it has to travel 10000 miles to get here.
    I wonder if I can find a similar device, without all the other stuff that a regular DMM measures, somewhere in Europe. Did a quick google search without luck.

  30. #230
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    First crack was almost violent, no doubt because the temperature was climbing too rapidly. The thermometer read about 180°C when it started. Same the other two times. All three times this was where I desperately was trying to regain control over the temperature without much luck. I need a DMM. I quite fancy the Heatsnob thing, but I hate the idea that it has to travel 10000 miles to get here.
    I suspect if you start from cold the process will slow down sufficiently for you to intervene in a timely manner.

    Yep, temp control is what the process is about.

    The heat snob seems to be a popular device, in this day and age distance means little.
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  31. #231
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    And....

    You have the advantage of being able to use the excellent (but free) CS Roast Monitor Software.
    This adds another level of control, consistency capability and simplified record keeping.

    Worth keeping in mind.

    Mal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    The heat snob seems to be a popular device, in this day and age distance means little.
    Heatsnob ordered!
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    Finally got around to roasting the first batches with the aid of the Heatsnob. What a wonderful little thing! I'm certainly not too much in charge of what's going on yet, but once I learn how to fine-tune the heat gun, I'm sure the Heatsnob will be a great help. I roasted three batches, a Yergicheffe, a Costa Rica, and an espresso blend. The Yergicheffe went ok, and the other two I was really pleased with. Unfortunately, I saved the roast profiles as Excel-files with hundreds of lines of figures - should have chosen the JPG, I suppose - but here's a pic of the Costa Rica batch.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  34. #234
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knastoer View Post
    Finally got around to roasting the first batches with the aid of the Heatsnob. What a wonderful little thing! I'm certainly not too much in charge of what's going on yet, but once I learn how to fine-tune the heat gun, I'm sure the Heatsnob will be a great help. I roasted three batches, a Yergicheffe, a Costa Rica, and an espresso blend. The Yergicheffe went ok, and the other two I was really pleased with. Unfortunately, I saved the roast profiles as Excel-files with hundreds of lines of figures - should have chosen the JPG, I suppose - but here's a pic of the Costa Rica batch.
    Looks good to me, well done.
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  35. #235
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Looks good to me, well done.
    Yep...
    Ditto from me.

    Mal.
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  36. #236
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    First attempt at roasting on a Corretto tonight after my Behmor carked it on Saturday.

    Bought an Ozito HG and paired it with a Sunbeam Bakehouse Compact which has a 20 minute dough cycle.

    Will order a HeatSnob so I can see what’s really going on in there, but I dissected the lid and retained the aluminium case to poke the heat gun through while keeping it nice and hot in there.

    First batch was 300gms of Ethiopian Gambella. It took too long to roast and the cycle cut out after 20 mins. An extremely quick cool of the machine and away we went again, unfortunately with a 3 minute ‘intermittent’ paddle to begin with. As a result, it came out a little uneven, but pulled it around what the Americans would call a City+

    Yielded around 250gms.

    Next up was some PNG - I upped it to 500gms of green to see the difference. Contrary to my predictions it was somewhat easier to get a more consistent roast! And this time I’d had a better handle on the heat gun’s temperature. Hit first crack around 16 minutes, didn’t quite make SC but pulled it when it finished and by looks of it it’s again a City+ type roast, maybe full city

    Have to work on a cooling mechanism. Baby steps. But 700-ish gms is a lot for me, I don’t often roast ahead so will enjoy these with family.

    Apologies for the dates on the bags. It’s late here and I need sleep!


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  37. #237
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Looking good!
    Yep - the 20 min dough cycle you can just about live with, but the overheat cut-off is a pain. There is a little metal tab in the inner wall of the breadmaker attached to some wires. If you are comfortable to unscrew this, wrap it in electrical tape and tuck it back away in the BM somewhere that will help. (usual 240v electrical warnings apply!!!!) Also insulating the pan can help too by keeping the heat out of the casing and tripping the sensor…
    Cheers Matt
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  38. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    Looking good!
    Yep - the 20 min dough cycle you can just about live with, but the overheat cut-off is a pain. There is a little metal tab in the inner wall of the breadmaker attached to some wires. If you are comfortable to unscrew this, wrap it in electrical tape and tuck it back away in the BM somewhere that will help. (usual 240v electrical warnings apply!!!!) Also insulating the pan can help too by keeping the heat out of the casing and tripping the sensor…
    Cheers Matt
    Thanks Matt! Not brave enough to tinker just yet. Are there bread makers you’d recommend that have a longer dough cycle? That’d be my first preference.

    Also it’s only a day old but I tried the PNG and quite like it. Very nice in milk - and I’ve never really liked this bean from the Behmor maybe because I was going too dark. Actually well roasted and the obvious problem is I can’t replicate it! Come on HeatSnob! Looking forward to trying this bean once it has rested further.

    Just shaking my head at how this is a thing. Wish I’d tried it earlier, perhaps after popper.

  39. #239
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElShauno View Post
    Thanks Matt! Not brave enough to tinker just yet. Are there bread makers you’d recommend that have a longer dough cycle? That’d be my first preference.
    20 minutes should be fine - more roasts I do are around that time, and smaller batches (350g) around 17-18 minute.

    Quote Originally Posted by ElShauno View Post
    Just shaking my head at how this is a thing. Wish I’d tried it earlier, perhaps after popper.
    The ole correttos are pretty handy IMHO. I can roast 4-5x 800g batches in a row in mine, and get very good results. All for under $250 - brand new!
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  40. #240
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    750 grams in my Corretto to about CS9, usually around the 19 min mark, certainly never over 20.
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  41. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    20 minutes should be fine - more roasts I do are around that time, and smaller batches (350g) around 17-18 minute.

    The ole correttos are pretty handy IMHO. I can roast 4-5x 800g batches in a row in mine, and get very good results. All for under $250 - brand new!
    Yeah I’m loving it. Just roasted 500gms (post roast weight) of Brazil Pulped Natural last night. Getting the hang of it and the HeatSnob is on the way.

    I now have a little over 1kg of roasted coffee in storage - the most I’ve ever had for such relatively little effort.

    Already thinking about how to set it up semi permanently in the shed, and what I can do to better control chaff and smoke etc. A great little project indeed.

  42. #242
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    My current roaster has been a long term development project (see my album for various iterations!) but a champion nonetheless. I reckon around 8 years and possibly 400kg of beans?
    It has been showing plenty of signs of wear recently - the plastic is starting to breakdown around the edges, getting noisy, the pan is distorting and getting thin in spots. And the other night I caught the edge of the lid on a bench and dropped it, and the brittle fibro all disintegrated.

    I happened to have built a roaster for my brother about 12 months ago, and made two new streamlined steel lids (with this day in mind) and used one for his. So when the lid fell apart I finally had an excuse, pulled out all the bits i'd prepared earlier, grabbed our current Breville BBM100 breadmaker (the corretto king!) from the house and replaced it with a new identical one (why fix what ain't broke) from Hardly Stormin' for $99.
    New fire blanket, paddle extender, splitter and mesh bean jump-guard. Couple of spade terminal swaps, remove the master control board, swap the switch out from the old one, and we're good to go! I've painted the lid in high-temp stove black outside, so hoping that will keep any rust away. Inside has been sanded/brushed to remove any gal, then oiled, although it will also be coffee oiled over time I'm sure.

    Can't wait to try it out!

    Here's the before & after - a few more shots in my corretto album

    Cheers Matt



    IMG_1730.JPG IMG_1735.JPG
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  43. #243
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Looks nice Matt!


    Java "New toy, WooHoo!" phile
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    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  44. #244
    Senior Member noonar's Avatar
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    How do you get the roasted beans out Matt? I have the base of the roaster hinged to the stand so that it tilts forward and dumps the roasted into my fan cooler below. Great looking set up.

  45. #245
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    Looking very nice Matt. I had actually wondered about Gal or zinc coated steel, whether the coating needs to be stripped at roasting temps to not give off gases.

  46. #246
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonar View Post
    How do you get the roasted beans out Matt? I have the base of the roaster hinged to the stand so that it tilts forward and dumps the roasted into my fan cooler below. Great looking set up.
    The lid is hinged – I'll just grab the inlet spout and lift the whole pan out. The lid has tabs locking them onto the pan lip, so won't come off. I also thought about hingeing the whole thing - I may well do that some day!

  47. #247
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hipsi View Post
    Looking very nice Matt. I had actually wondered about Gal or zinc coated steel, whether the coating needs to be stripped at roasting temps to not give off gases.
    Little hard to know. It burns of when welding, but that is a much higher temp. That's why I stripped the inside back to the mild steel and oiled (where it may be in contact with beans) and on the outside used the stove black paint to keep it contained. Guess we'll see!

  48. #248
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    Very nice Matt, but please be careful with that galvanised steel. Heating it via the roasting process might be hot enough to give off toxic gases even if you think you got it off the inside, the top might still release it. If you google, there are easy methods to remove the gal coating ie; soaking in vinegar or hydrochloric acid. Personally, I would strip the paint and bathe it in acid. You could also then heat it up with a flame (in a ventilated area) to check for or burn off any excess gal. I'm pretty sure any remaining gal will produce some kind of smoke.

  49. #249
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by fg1972 View Post
    Very nice Matt, but please be careful with that galvanised steel. Heating it via the roasting process might be hot enough to give off toxic gases even if you think you got it off the inside, the top might still release it. If you google, there are easy methods to remove the gal coating ie; soaking in vinegar or hydrochloric acid. Personally, I would strip the paint and bathe it in acid. You could also then heat it up with a flame (in a ventilated area) to check for or burn off any excess gal. I'm pretty sure any remaining gal will produce some kind of smoke.
    Thanks for the concern and advice. I’ll do some test runs and see how it looks ...

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