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Thread: Just how good is home roasting?

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    Just how good is home roasting?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    As somebody who is just beginning to explore home roasting I wonder how, when done well, it compares to a well roasted commercial product? Over the years Ive read a bit about and talked to commercial roasters and have often found theyre as passionate about the product they produce as any good Barista is about theirs. In addition theyre using enormously expensive and sophisticated equipment to achieve that end result.

    Now of course some of the expense/sophistication comes as a result of size. You dont exactly wheel your 60kg roaster outside to spray chaff and smoke all over the neighbourhood! However is it possible, using equipment readily available to the home enthusiast, to produce an end product consistently better than the commercially roasted equivalent? In other words Im ruling out somebody running a sample roaster at home, rather using something like a Hottop or "corretto"?

    While Im sure roasting at home is interesting, and most certainly educational (not to mention cheaper), to me its all about whats in the cup. So while I may mess about with a popper just for fun, there may be no point in getting too carried away with it if it will never truly replicate the results of a professional.

    So what do you think? Be honest now *;)

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    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    There was quite a lengthy discussion on this subject not too long ago.
    One of the points made by those who commercially roast or have in the past is that the commercial roasters offer more and varied control than the vast majority of home roasting devices.

    Jason from Pioneer, for example, has briefly touched upon changing airflows of some roasts at different times to produce dramatically different results. This sort of thing isnt usually going to come into play for the home roaster.

    So, it certainly appears to be the case that a commercial roaster is going to be capable of getting more out of certain beans or blends.

    Having said that, I still say that my home roasted stuff will stack up very favourably against a majority of commercial stuff.

    You might never be able to replicate a specific commercial roast, but you can still produce some top notch roasts at home.

    I use the BBQ drum method and have done so for the last 4 years. I often give a 250g bag of my beans to someone to try out. The responses are always very good.

    So honestly, I think it is worth it, but taste is a very subjective thing.

    Brett.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Pete,

    There was a roast-off some time ago between a commercial roaster and a number of home roasters (details were posted here at the time) but....

    To give my personal opinion...

    There are two things (related to only the roasting) which determine flavour in the cup...

    The quality and controllability of the roaster
    The expertise and knowledge of the operator of the roaster.

    Now knowledge and skill can be developed by reading about the process (lots of good info here and elsewhere on the internet) and by practice, practice and more practice!

    There is no doubt large commercial machines have more control over the heating profile, airflow etc than many home roasters..... and correct use of these controls will produce a different flavour profile. You will notice I didnt say "better" but "different"..... Now, depending on your palate, this difference could make the resultant espresso taste better.....

    Home roaster generally also roast single origins where most commercial roasters do blends. Blending can and generally does improve the flavour profile...... however home roasters can do this as well - but to do this (as a commercial roaster does) requires even more knowledge.

    Id suggest the home roasts I do produce an excellent espresso...... is it exactly the same as a commercial roaster could produce? Nope...... but, in some cases I prefer the taste of mine. I can experiment.... there being many factors I can change until I get what I like...... but you must document what you have done so you can repeat the roast again..... exactly how you did it last time.

    Is home roasting worthwhile (nor just in a monetary sense)? *- absolutely!!!!
    Can an identical roast be produced to a commercial roaster? - generally not
    Does the difference detract from whats in the cup? - after learning the techniques IMHO nope!

    But to get a good home roast you need something which will give you control over the roast.... very hard with a popper but both a Corretto and Hottop give you close to the control of a commercial roaster....

    But dont think for a minute there is a "set and forget" solution to home roasting.... there isnt! To get good profile control is a very manual process..... just like commercial roasters you control the roast and the resulting quality of the product is heavily dependent on the amount of effort you expend in the process.

    The results are great, yes there are cost savings..... but the biggest buzz to me (and I suspect most other home roasters) is the satisfaction of roasting your own beans - always having freshly roasted beans available.... and of whatever single origin or blend you choose!!!!

    It is well worth the effort.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Hi there
    I totally agree with fatboy and JavaB.
    Addiditonally for me its about the convenience with home roasting, i always have fresh beens of what ever SO bean i feel like and a couple of blends as well.
    The cost effective component is just a bonus, given i go through about 500gm of green per week, it soon adds up over a year if i compared pricing against a retail fresh roasted coffee outlet.

    Mal

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    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    I am totally hooked on home roasting. Ive got my Corretto refined now so that I have good control over my roasts. I record each roast now using Peters Excel spreadsheet which is on my laptop next to roaster. Ive been setting up a profile file for each bean so that when I want to do a roast I can select the origin profile I require and replicate that profile. Family and friends rave about the freshness, aroma and taste of my home roasts. My green bean cupboard has gone from a stash of 5kg to 30kg now consisting of 11 beans types, if it drops below 30kg I start getting anxious for the next beanbay!!! I have learnt so much about coffee through home roasting, about origins, how they are grown, processed and marketed.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    I am unable to believe the commercial roasters can get the product to the consumer at the peak of freshness. My home roasting over the last 2 years, from convection oven in the kitchen to hot air popper to I roast to coretto proved one thing. No matter how I roast at home, it is better than store bought. period. Good luck, keep experimenting. Not every roast was drinkable but every roast taught me something, even if it was just to payt attention. John

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by brokenarrowjbe link=1230245340/0#5 date=1230253421
    I am unable to believe the commercial roasters can get the product to the consumer at the peak of freshness.
    Well John, let me enlighten you. In my case, nothing goes out to a customer that was roasted more than a week ago, and quite often, its roasted the night before being shipped to a customer. I believe this to be true of many speciality roasters, particularly those that are fellow Sponsors on this website.

    Home roasting is great. There is a great deal of satisfaction in doing it yourself and agree that its often better than what you can buy at the shops. Just dont confuse speciality roasters with Gloria Jeans.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Fatty and others, thanks for that, and yes sorry Im sure this has been discussed many times before but until recently I had no reason to lurk here and I didnt see anything obvious in the search.

    I have to disagree about the freshness however. Many decent roasters I know roast, bag, send. Its fresh! Mind you NOT all do of course, but I have one I trust. Also Im not entirely sure about the convenience. I have ordered my (roasted) beans through the internet for some years now and they always arrive at my door within a few days of ordering, pretty much the same time I would need to let a batch I roasted myself sit and mellow out. Maybe marginally more convenient but not really a biggie to me.

    I most certainly dont expect my little popper to replicate some massive Probat or anything, it was more a case of, beans go in green, beans come out brown. Wow, look at that, who would have thought! *;D Even a complete numskull like myself had a bad feeling it was all over a bit too quickly, and of course I subsequently learnt thats precisely what poppers do. But I didnt really want to start getting involved with yet another learning process that was always going to produce something "second best". Its very clear to me already that Mr Popper is going to get the boot, and Barry Bread maker will get a guernsey. Not a massive capital expense, but a learning curve just the same.

    Replicating an existing commercial roast is something Im very unlikely to want to do. I agree everyones taste buds are different and what one person may find superb, another may find very ordinary. I think using it as a tool to learn more about regional variations is a massive attraction for myself and this reason alone would be good enough to pursue the exercise.

    Pete

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    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    I do it cos I love it
    I also like the challenge of home roster design

    Home roasters roast to a profile suited to them as a household or family group including close friends.
    It is most gratifying to get compliments on a daily basis on the flavour of the coffee
    I add this "some roasts may be hideous to some? " depending to what ethnic background you grew up in.

    Commercial roasters generally roast to a broad flavour profile with some speciality lines also on offer. May I say most do an excellent job
    The machines they use allow them a level of operator control to do that

    So the question is "How good is home roasting"

    Satisfying the needs of the person doing the roasting is all that matters
    And if home roasting coffee beans is not your cup of tea
    There are many options available to you through the commercial & boutique roasters

    End result is a happy coffee drinker :)

    KK





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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    This topic comes up again and again, as it should -- its a good one.

    One thing that I think we need to recognise is that in Australia you are a commercial, professional or specialty roaster if you say you are and sell your coffee ... those seem to be the only requirements. This means that commercial products run the gamut from stuff roasted for massive espresso chains and supermarkets, to microlots roasted for domestic consumption, to whatever some guy cooks up in his garage and sticks a price tag on. Pete, you were spot on to specify that you want to compare home roast to a well roasted commercial product!

    I would say that experience has a huge part to play in any roasters success ... be they a home roaster or a commercial roaster. Experienced roasters can not only taste what is going on with their coffees - thats the easy part - but can also pinpoint what is causing that taste. I know a few commercial roasters who are truly incredible in this regard; whilst I was scratching my head at the cupping table, they would pinpoint faults on samples down to things as specific as samples needing to be rested in a different part of the factory, one bean out of the eight in the blend needing to rest in the pallet racks for another few months, parts of the roaster needing to be serviced, roast profiles needing to be changed and, of course, green coffee needing to be returned to the supplier. Developing these sorts of skills takes a combination of time and money. I have to say that I get the impression that there are certainly a number of commercial roasters that start up their own roastery without much experience and then try to invest the minimum possible in improving their product.

    As a consumer, it is almost impossible to sort the sheep out from the goats. With the meteoric rise of the coffee internet, both consumers and roasters are bombarded with a whole bunch of jargon. Roasters of all skill levels deploy jargon in much the same way; over the past few years, I get the impression that coffee and blend descriptions have become increasingly longer and more complex. Its like some sort of arms race - as if roasters presume that consumers cant actually discriminate based on taste and will go for the coffee with the more absurd description. For example, if you havent drunk much coffee, I bet that youre just as likely to buy Ethiopian Aricha as Ethiopian Djimma ... theyre just words and theyre probably both accompanied by some flowery description of what the coffee will taste like. It would be very easy to try crappy coffee from such a roaster and be disappointed. I dream of the ACCC assembling a team of cuppers to crack down on misleading and deceptive coffee descriptions, but its not going to happen.

    Finding really good commercial coffee certainly takes some work and its worthwhile doing it whether you home roast or not. Commercial coffee will always be your benchmark for home roast. If you want to say that your home roast is better than commercial coffee, compare it with some stuff from your local supermarket, then put your fingers in your ears whenever anyone talks about anything better. I can think of one or two commercial roasters who take that approach and from whom I do not buy coffee. If you want to improve your home roast, buy as much different commercial coffee as you can, at least when you are starting up, and build up your palate. If you walk into any decent commercial roastery, somewhere or other they will have a room full of samples of their competitors products.

    Personally, I have tried a whole bunch of roasting gadgets and most of the coffee that I consume is from commercial roasters. This is just as much a reflection of my consumption patterns as it is a reflection of my roasting skills: I like to try a lot of different stuff and I find it more economical to do this through a number of commercial roasters who do the hard work of cupping samples and working out roast profiles for me. The commercial roasters that I buy from are always willing to give me the skinny on what stuff from which broker is cupping up best at the time and what I should be trying.

    So I suppose that after all of that, I still havent really answered the question. I would say that it is probably very difficult for a home roaster to consistently produce a better product than a good commercial roaster does. Commercial roasters enjoy advantages in sourcing their green, turning it over whilst it is fresh and tweaking their roasting profiles and storing methods to their satisfaction. To come close, I think that you probably need at least a few years of home roasting experience. Thats not to say that home roast cant produce a decent cup of coffee, though.

    Cheers,

    Luca

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Yes Im not out to achieve intrinsic satisfaction in saying "I roast it myself" if its basically crap. I was just talking to the owner of a coffee outlet and he mentioned he was about to start roasting, I had to resist the temptation to say "groan, big deal, you too". The point is its getting pretty crowded out there in the commercial world and it seems every man and his dog is a "coffee roaster" these days. Lets face it, for a small scale operation the start-up costs are minimal (in business terms) so if you have a cafe or two, go through a bit of bean, jump off the contract and DIY, makes good business sense. IF it were so easy!

    Having said all that, there are a lot of good commercial roasters out there and the "fly by night" operators will come and go, but those who provide a quality product at a reasonable price will still be around going strong. Despite what some retailers seem to believe, the buying public are not complete morons and word soon spreads. Incidentally Im not always convinced that poor blends that are available out there are the result of incompetence. Push some cheap robusta in there and it becomes easier to use, next week, well that worked Ill put a bit more in there, next week more still ... in the end it tastes like shite, but wouldnt you know, the profits go up ...at least for a while!

    Buying a blend and whats in it? At least roasting at home you should have some idea. Maybe a bit like buying "King Island Beef", judging by the amount of that stuff thats out on the shelves that must be the biggest island in the world!!

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by cuppacoffee link=1230245340/0#6 date=1230257008
    In my case, nothing goes out to a customer that was roasted more than a week ago, and quite often, its roasted the night before being shipped to a customer. *I believe this to be true of many speciality roasters, particularly those that are fellow Sponsors on this website.
    I dont believe this is always the case though. I recently bought some roasted beans from a very highly regarded site sponsor that has recently opened in my city, and the beans I got from there were already 10 days old when I got them. They had obviously also been stored in open bins for that time, so they had very little crema left in them when put through my machine. And the beans they had in one of the other bins was even older than this! I must admit that I had higher expectations of a place with their high reputation.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    I believe that both JavaB and Luca have made some excellent points in their posts and together have probably covered 99% of what it means to give home-roasting a go.

    Yes, there is a lot of science behind the basics of what is going on when roasting coffee but the quality of the output relies very much on the knowledge and expertise of the roaster, be they commercial or a home-roaster. I dont think there are any short-cuts that newbies can use to enable them to reliably produce excellent quality outcomes either. It takes a good understanding of the technical processes involved, time, experimentation, good record keeping, a hell of a lot of cupping coupled with a distinct effort to educate ones palate and loads of other factors.

    Is it worth it? To me... Hell yes! I imagine it must parallel the satisfaction of one who is passionate about food and has taken the time and trouble to learn how to get the best out of all the wonderful produce that abounds within our country. Someone who excels at this and does it for a living may be allowed to call oneself a Chef whereas someone who does it just at home for the family, friends and relos is more generally known as a great cook. I guess Im hoping to become, if not great, then a decent cook. Still have a long way to go I reckon but every now and again, the coffee I roast here at home really blows my socks off (and that of my family, friends and relos) and that really makes all the effort (and failures) worthwhile.

    Time for a brew... ;)

    Mal.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    On the site its very clear that people can become very enthused about the process of roasting, and I can start to understand why. However different people gain different satisfaction from different things. I may, for example, get a huge amount of satisfaction from restoring a machine, somebody else just couldnt be bothered.

    The reason I started the thread was not to feed of others enthusiasm, it was to determine if this was appropriate for ME (and maybe others like me. OMG poor people *:D). To paraphrase Lucas signature, its whats in MY cup that counts. I do a huge number of things myself, in all manner of areas, from home renovation, car servicing, electronics, mechanical engineering, furniture making, and so it goes on. Sure I get satisfaction from doing the work, but the main reason I do it is because I know the chances are Ill do the job better, albeit MUCH slower, than if I was to get a so called "professional" in to do it. Each area involves a whole set of skills I have to learn and problems I will never have seen before. But at the end of the often laborious process I sometimes need several goes at to get right, Im left with a result that suits ME; its whats in MY cup. So it is with any new area, I try to take a step back and ask, given realistic time/expense constraints is it possible I will be able to reach a point where I am reasonably consistently doing this job better than a professional (who may be bound by constraints that dont apply to my situation). Unless thats the case Im simply not interested in going down the path. It reminds me somewhat of these "home shows" featuring a segment where you make lamp shades out of potato skins or something equally hideous. At the end Im left wondering why you would possibly bother spending a good afternoon wasting your time and money on something that looks like crap. Just go out and buy a lamp shade! But to others the satisfaction is completely different.

    So the message Im getting is that roasting at home isnt just producing potato skin lamp shades just to say "I made it myself". Thanks for the thoughts

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    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    One thing I get from it, as others have said above, is the satisfaction I get from the praise of family and friends.

    I also like introducing people to good coffee;
    teaching them that theres better coffee out there than in most cafes.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    I started home roasting in an attempt to drink better coffee than I was getting using supermarket stale roasted beans.
    Went down the (usual) path of Popper (6 months) then Corretto (about 12 months now). The Popper was an eye opener in terms of what (good coffee taste) could be achieved. Progressed to the Corretto for the degree of control and roast sizes available.
    I have bought a reasonable amount of commercially roasted coffee in the last six months as a check on my home roasts.
    The conclusion I have come to is that, to me, my home roasts are the equal of most of the commercial offerings that I tried.
    Also I can tailor the roasts to what I enjoy.
    Now if I lived close to Jasons place up at Yandina, or close to the Snobbery down south, then I might have a rethink, but as things stand Im happy to keep on roasting.

    Cheers,
    Alan.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thundergod link=1230245340/0#14 date=1230286964
    One thing I get from it, as others have said above, is the satisfaction I get from the praise of family and friends.

    I also like introducing people to good coffee;
    teaching them that theres better coffee out there than in most cafes.
    But couldnt the same be said even if you went out and just bought good quality roasted beans?

    I travel a great deal and am often asked what the coffee scene is like here in Sydney. I have to confess to them that, as bizarre as it sounds, Im really not THAT familiar. If Im in Sydney some of the best coffee I can get (without *trying to sound like Im "blowing my own trumpet" btw) is in my own home so I dont bother going anywhere else (mind you the service sucks, the venue is a dump, and the Barista smells). I thought I had better change that so the other day I went into town to a, umm, certain "5 bean rated" cafe, possibly in the CBD. Maybe in some royal sounding street? Anyway, if thats the best thats on offer in Sydney, Im staying home more often. *:o Good, very good actually, but not great. A hike across town to another "5 bean" jobbie had me rewarded with a "closed for renovations" sign. *:(

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    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteF link=1230245340/0#16 date=1230289096
    But couldnt the same be said even if you went out and just bought good quality roasted beans?
    Yes.
    But like I said, I have introduced them to good coffee.
    Until then they didnt know it existed.

    I started off with an excellent grinder and coffee machine, no upgraditis for me.
    At the same time I sourced excellent roasted beans; maybe lucky, maybe good research.

    I had the good fortune to be able to learn a lot about coffee from that roaster and in time, when I started roasting for myself, that knowledge gained came in handy.

    I still buy from roasters I trust in order to guage how I stack up and to gain some more understanding of what good coffee is/can be.

    I was given a copy of "the coffee guide ... Sydney" for Christmas.
    Some of those 5 bean places I have tried and I dont agree with the rating; others I will give a go but they get one shot at it (pun intended).

  19. #19
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Pete
    I think that you a limited in your results due to the equipment you are using.
    However you have not indicated what you are using
    I see only one cure for this
    Build a roaster that has a proven record (results speak for themselves)
    or buy a ready made unit like the Hottop or a Gene Cafe

    At least with the Hottop you can control your roast and store your favored results to be reproduced in auto mode

    I am confident that your home roasting results will improve
    You just need the right tools

    Short of that you can enquire from fellow members that live close to you if they would not mind giving you a sample of home roasted coffee.
    Even if it’s only to compare the commercial product with the home roast

    You (as in yourself) can’t judge a commercial product against your own efforts as you have stated “because you are a beginner and not as experienced”

    However a competent home roaster I believe can produce a product that if judged would hold there own

    KK




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    Senior Groupie LindaD's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal link=1230245340/0#12 date=1230279616
    Is it worth it? To me... Hell yes! I imagine it must parallel the satisfaction of one who is passionate about food and has taken the time and trouble to learn how to get the best out of all the wonderful produce that abounds within our country. Someone who excels at this and does it for a living may be allowed to call oneself a Chef whereas someone who does it just at home for the family, friends and relos is more generally known as a great cook. I guess Im hoping to become, if not great, then a decent cook. Still have a long way to go I reckon but every now and again, the coffee I roast here at home really blows my socks off (and that of my family, friends and relos) and that really makes all the effort (and failures) worthwhile.
    Mal, you took the words right out of my mouth!...I have a friend who drops in literally begging me for a decent coffee, because the one he had in some dive in Melbourne, tasted like burnt milk and made him gag just at the first taste. ;D

    I love doing what I do, for the pleasure it gives me and those who drink my coffee.

    -Linda

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteF link=1230245340/0#13 date=1230284761
    I do a huge number of things myself, in all manner of areas, from home renovation, car servicing, electronics, mechanical engineering, furniture making, and so it goes on. Sure I get satisfaction from doing the work, but the main reason I do it is because I know the chances are Ill do the job better, albeit MUCH slower, than if I was to get a so called "professional" in to do it. Each area involves a whole set of skills I have to learn and problems ..... (etc)
    Pete,

    Im not dissimilar to you in most regards..... BUT if you find a dedicated and motivated person in any of the areas you mention they can - and will - do the job better. They have learnt heaps about their field of endeavour.... and are still learning all the time and getting better... and there is zero chance either you or I could do the job better than they can now (unless we live long enough after they have died so we can develop the same skill level!)

    The unfortunate truth is you have to find those individuals. Many who you come across do it only for the money, do it "because it is all they can do" or their experience is one year- but twenty times over.... they have never gained from their experience..... Yes, we can do the job better than these people because we have the enthusiasm and get satisfaction from doing the job correctly which they dont have or will ever get. Yes it will take us longer, yes it maybe more expensive (correcting mistakes along the way)...... but we can do it!

    Coffee roasting is a lot like that. There are excellent roasters who have passion and demand perfection of themselves..... But for every one of those there are probably 10 roasters who are turning out a mediocre, boring and certainly not a quality roast..... over, and over, and over again.

    So you can hunt out the passionate roasters (and site sponsors are a good starting point)..... and purchase their beans. If you do roast your own (and the same applies to *" home renovation, car servicing, electronics, mechanical engineering, furniture making" ) - you should always compare your results to a known "passionate" expert..... and make sure what you are doing is up to par. It is a reality check which needs to be done every so often...... Not only "do my roasted beans come close to xxxxxx" but also "when I do my expert car service - have I actually missed something important"...... Without resetting your frame of reference to a known good source..... there is a danger that you will continue in "ignorant bliss" - believing that you are doing a good job when you arent is far too easy (and there are already enough "professionals" doing that!)

    And when you do check against the reference you will know how well you are doing..... and in roasting I know Im doing far better than most "run of the mill" roasters..... but not as well as someone who is a professional roaster with better equipment and a similar level of passion - but with a lot more experience...... And as long as they continue to roast, they will improve..... but I can never catch up.....

    However it is fun trying..... and knowing I can produce better than a significant percentage of roasted beans which are being sold in Australia..... that is satisfaction enough!

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    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Well said Robin, Im sure all of us Coffeesnobs are striving to improve our roasting skills and producing the best espresso that we possibly can. Im savouring a PNG Sigri CS8/9 3 days p/roast done in plunger while typing this reply.................bellisimo!!!

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by JavaB link=1230245340/20#20 date=1230296403
    Im not dissimilar to you in most regards..... BUT if you find a dedicated and motivated person in any of the areas you mention they can - and will - do the job better. They have learnt heaps about their field of endeavour.... and are still learning all the time and getting better... and there is zero chance either you or I could do the job better than they can now (unless we live long enough after they have died so we can develop the same skill level!)
    Ah yes that is absolutely right and I was going to write something along those lines at the time but I was beginning to think I was sounding like a big enough tosser without going on about it *;D I believe there are exceptions however that I touched on, in terms of the constraints. At the end of the day those people are running a business and as such the constraints MAY negatively affect the final product. Individuals generally have a whole different set of constraints. Typically time features pretty big in the commercial list, whereas expense is unremarkably prominent on an individuals list. Anyone who has ever formally learnt a trade will, I expect, confirm that if you did things the way as taught in trade school youd be broke in a week! I believe its often that different set of constraints that determines whether an individual can potentially exceed what is commercially available or alternatively will never reach it.

    KK, its not what Im using now that really interests me, Ive only had a play around once. As I mentioned, its the realistic potential for home roasting that Im interested in; is it potentially possible to at least meet, or preferably exceed, the results of a good commercial roaster at home. Of course whats "realistic" to one person may be totally unrealistic to another due to those pesky constraints. If the general consensus was "sure its possible, just go out and get yourself a $xxxxx sample roaster, apprentice yourself for 4 years, umm oh you will need 3 phase power, dedicated area ...." well sorry thats not realistic in my book. On the other hand, lets say a Hottop could match a commercial roaster, well thats realistic (maybe). Same for the skill set.

    TG Im afraid I dont really understand what you mean *:-? I have had some truly superb coffee from outlets over the years and, as far as I recall, not one of them roasted their own. Im not sure I agree that roasting yourself .... no wait that the entertainment. ... roasting BEANS yourself is a necessity to produce truly first class espresso. First class beans from an expert roaster will STILL potentially produce better espresso than 99% of cafes, sans the intrinsic satisfaction of saying "I roasted these beans myself"

    Pete

  24. #24
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteF link=1230245340/20#22 date=1230332031
    TG Im afraid I dont really understand what you mean *:-? I have had some truly superb coffee from outlets over the years and, as far as I recall, not one of them roasted their own. Im not sure I agree that roasting yourself .... no wait that the entertainment. ... roasting BEANS yourself is a necessity to produce truly first class espresso. First class beans from an expert roaster will STILL potentially produce better espresso than 99% of cafes, sans the intrinsic satisfaction of saying "I roasted these beans myself"

    Pete
    Ive had some good coffees too but those outlets are few and far between.
    What I was trying to say is that most people dont know what good coffee tastes like because of that rarity.
    They wouldnt be looking for an expert roaster as they would be at the mercy of the produce of those retail outlets. Thats all they are used to.

    Remember.....youre a coffee snob now; you have a different perspective to the bulk of the population.

    I have a theory that people put sugar in coffee to overcome the taste of bad coffee.
    No one I make coffee for uses sugar in my coffee; they still use sugar elsewhere.

    How many people do you know that put sugar in their coffee?

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Ha ha, mate Ive been a coffee snob for a while now, just not around here *;)

    Oh theres no doubt people put sugar in coffee to balance the bitterness. I generally do when Im out too. Indeed my "sugometer" is a very accurate guide to just how good or bad the coffee is! I never use sugar at home and always forget to put it out when people come over. Unfortunately I think many people just put it in from habit, and dont really think about what theyre doing.

    As interest, Im having major battles with my machine at the moment, and its being stupidly finicky about the dosage Im feeding it. I have a feeling the gicleur I machined up is somewhat over-size, but thats another story. The point is, even with some serious channelling going on and not exactly "text book" pours (to say the least), the end result is STILL better than most commercial outlets. So one has to wonder what the heck THEY do to butcher it so badly, so regularly!

    Anyway, thats all well and good but seriously off topic. What Im interested in is whether home roasting has the potential to add or merely subtracts from the end product in the cup as compared to good commercially roasted beans.

  26. #26
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Just a couple of considerations...

    Your local cafe will quite often be far more interested in whether they get a free machine, t-shirts, etc., than how good the coffee is that they buy. To make matters worse, they also have a very limited investment in staff training.

    Of course, there are some cafes that are passionate about the quality of what they serve - they are often easy to identify by the length of the queues waiting to be served.

    Home roasters are probably finiciky by nature, and no matter what their level of experience, have this community available as an incredible resource - not only to develop and refine their skills, but to start with what I consider a wonderful array of quality raw beans. I souce greens for my blends from wholesalers, because I need a constant and fairly consistent supply.

    Though when it comes to my SO offerings, I have a personal scout who has a knack for finding the best greens available then offers them at very reasonable prices on a monthly basis. His name is Andy if you hadnt already guessed. No wonder then that many CS home roasters consider what they produce to be superior to store bought coffee. I know I may be over simplifying, but it just stands to reason that if you start with quality produce you have a far greater chance that the end result will also be better.


  27. #27
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    KK, its not what Im using now that really interests me, Ive only had a play around once. As I mentioned, its the realistic potential for home roasting that Im interested in; is it potentially possible to at least meet, or preferably exceed, the results of a good commercial roaster at home. Of course whats "realistic" to one person may be totally unrealistic to another due to those pesky constraints. If the general consensus was "sure its possible, just go out and get yourself a $xxxxx sample roaster, apprentice yourself for 4 years, umm oh you will need 3 phase power, dedicated area ...." well sorry thats not realistic in my book. On the other hand, lets say a Hottop could match a commercial roaster, well thats realistic (maybe). Same for the skill set.
    The realistic potential of home roasting is YES it can be done and it can be done to a high standard

    Here is proof
    Re: Another Snob in the news...
    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1213341475

    If home roasting was impossible or inferior to the commercial product then no one would do it

    Yes you will have to learn but in reality it wont take a lot of roasts under your belt to arrive at a personal satisfaction level and beyond with time

    My grandmother when alive used to roast her beans in a shallow pan much in the same way African tribes still do it now
    Her coffee style was Greek/Turkish
    She used a mortar and pestle to grind it to a powder

    KK



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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by Koffee Kosmo link=1230245340/20#26 date=1230348516
    If home roasting was impossible or inferior to the commercial product then no one would do it
    Well Im afraid I have to respectfully disagree with you there. There is a huge amount of intrinsic satisfaction people get from making something themselves, even though in many cases there is no doubt its inferior to a commercially produced example. Maybe "potato skin lamp shades" was a bit over the top, but a lot of "crafts" would never past muster if they were on the commercial market, yet people enjoy the process of making them. Even here, the overwhelming message I get is that the number one motivator is the satisfaction in roasting at home.

    The ability to get into smaller lots, too small to be of commercial interest, I can imagine would be a great point I hadnt thought of. Agree, commercially most cafes are purely price driven or have the product dictated to them by the lease/contract theyre operating under.

  29. #29
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    . On the other hand, lets say a Hottop could match a commercial roaster, well thats realistic (maybe). Same for the skill set.
    There is more to the comparative value of home roasting than just, "Can it be better than a commercial roaster?" Can a home roaster exceed the product of the better commercial roaster/ There is no one answer to that. the reason is that coffee quality is subjective. I have had a few commercial roasts and blends that exceeded what I could accomplish at home, but I have had more that do not. Mostly the reason is that I have developed a blend that works for me-- it creates a flavor that I like, and I can do it repeatedly. When I grow a bit tired of it, I just adjust the blend a bit.

    The other benefit is that you get fresh coffee all the time. Just keep a supply of green on hand. Fresh counts for a lot!

    In regards to the process, it is not all that difficult (depending on the appliance you choose). While thee are enough nuances to keep you busy reading and experimenting for a lifetime, the basics are quite easy to learn. You will get good at it in a short time, but it takes a lifetime to master. Much like driving- No matter how well you learn to drift a corner, Lewis Hamilton probably has nothing to worry about from you.

    I have only used two home roasters that I would say compare to commercial roaster output-- the Hottop (a company I work with), and the Genecafe. I know for a fact that a number of small growers and small roastaries use the Hottop KN-8828B as a sample roaster because it is quite affordable compared to the sample roasters generally used by the industry. The first ever 100% Kona roasted espresso blend was developed on a Hottop. That all says a lot about the level of control that the Hottop supplies the user.

    The Genecafe is a good appliance, but it lacks efficient cooling and has no memory, so you have to manually control every roast at every step of the way.

    SO... unless you have a local roaster that knows how to roast a quality coffee, and you pass by there often enough to pick up a fresh supply once every en days or so, take the next step to quality coffee at home and learn to roast. I started just over 8 years ago and have not regretted it.

    DISCLAIMER: While I work as an independent contractor for Hottop (among other companies) I do not benefit from sales of the roasters.


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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by Koffee Kosmo link=1230245340/20#26 date=1230348516

    If home roasting was impossible or inferior to the commercial product then no one would do it
    Groan. Im about to set myself up to get flamed (again)....I know less than a handful of home roasters who do a superb job. The other samples Ive seen, been offered, and tasted, have well and truly been inferior.

    If you think you make a better lasagne than me, thats great. Theres not much point in arguing, "yours is better than mine". Just go ahead and enjoy it.


  31. #31
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Fair points Den... :)

    The quality of the end result is entirely within the domain of the person in control (leaving out the quality of the equipment being used) and the particular mindset of the individual. Some of us are never satisfied with the status quo, always striving to improve on what has gone before, others are quite happy to call it quits at some level that makes em happy. It doesnt really matter though, so long as you are gaining something positive from your endeavours.

    For what its worth, Ive always been something of a perfectionist (albeit a pragmatic one in more recent times); as far back as I can remember. As a result, with my coffee roasting, if a roast batch doesnt turn out exactly as planned then I have to know why, make adjustments to my process and then try again. Ultimately, I achieve something that is as close to my goals as I can get and that then becomes a benchmark for future roasts of that particular bean/crop/blend. This is probably one of the main reasons I really enjoy home-roasting coffee so much, as the desired goal is very often a moving target; sometimes a fast one and it is this that makes it so enjoyable for me. Not because it is easy, but because it requires significant concentrated effort on my part. At the end of the process though, a great coffee brew in the cup makes it all worth while and that is what were all aiming for in the end... To a lesser or greater degree ;)

    Mal.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by cuppacoffee link=1230245340/20#29 date=1230350547
    Quote Originally Posted by Koffee Kosmo link=1230245340/20#26 date=1230348516

    If home roasting was impossible or inferior to the commercial product then no one would do it
    Groan. *Im about to set myself up to get flamed (again)....I know less than a handful of home roasters who do a superb job. *The other samples Ive seen, been offered, and tasted, have well and truly been inferior.

    If you think you make a better lasagne than me, thats great. *Theres not much point in arguing, "yours is better than mine". *Just go ahead and enjoy it.
    See my signature. I have absolutely no doubt that my home roasts are not as good as commercial stuff.
    But they are way better than the crap from the supermarket.
    So that sits them in a nice middle ground, and for around $13 kg delivered its bloody good value!

    Then theres the freshness issue. I know exactly how fresh my home roasts are and generally roast about 2 cups of beans ( dunno the weight as I have no accurate scales) every 5 or 6 days.

    I also get great satisfaction out of roasting my own coffee. I love the process.

    Oh and I dont make lasagne, but I do make the worlds best spag bolognese * *

  33. #33
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    No flame wars here ;) Good smaller volume roasters are a lot different to roasters turning out the same blend by the ton week after week then letting it sit on a shelf until it sells.

    I like the variation and playing with roast variables and the satisfaction of DIY. Cost is also a factor, payback of even a Hottop/Gene is about 1-2 years at even small quantities. Freshness is a major factor as the cost of postage from a good roaster on 1/2kg lots makes it a bit exepensive for every week.

    Currently I am still buying about 1/4 of my beans as Brown to compare against what I am roasting also nice to try a different bean or blend. In the main I am happy with my home roasts as a major improvement over what I was drinking (stupormarket swill) but still lots of room for improvement.

  34. #34
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by cuppacoffee link=1230245340/20#25 date=1230340916

    Though when it comes to my SO offerings, I have a personal scout who has a knack for finding the best greens available then offers them at very reasonable prices on a monthly basis. *His name is Andy if you hadnt already guessed. *No wonder then that many CS home roasters consider what they produce to be superior to store bought coffee. *I know I may be over simplifying, but it just stands to reason that if you start with quality produce you have a far greater chance that the end result will also be better.
    I think Dennis has "hit the nail on the head" with that statement!

    Pretty much the only beans I roast and consume are SO..... and yes, we have an extraordinary range of exceptional quality beans available through CS.

    Some time ago we were cupping a PNG SO at 5 Senses..... and it was spectacular! The Master Roaster there commented how superb it was - and he was dead right. His problem was that he could only get it in small quantities - certainly not enough to sell commercially as a SO or to even blend with other beans for commercial sale.

    So commercial roasters, even the best, are limited to what is available in commercial quantities..... and the quality must also be consistent.

    Home roasters (who are fortunate enough to have a supply like CS green....) can have access to these unique high quality (but low volume) beans.... and even if we can only obtain 80% of the flavour profile a high quality commercial roaster could get..... even at 80% those beans can be amazing! And Commercial roasters generally wont bother with them as there isnt enough to incorporate into their blends....

    So there is far more to home roasting than trying to "better" or even "equal" the pros..... we have an opportunity to experiment with a far wider range of bean varieties..... and that, in itself, is very rewarding (both in terms of personal satisfaction and also "whats in the cup")

  35. #35
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    For me, roasting my own is worth it because I can use excellent quality beans that match my individual tastes exactly, and roast them to the degree I prefer, thereby satisfying my needs more closely than with "over-the-counter" products.

    As JavaB points out, the commercial offerings are subject to different limitations and goals, relating to quantity, consistency, and broad appeal. Its a bit like comparing apples with oranges - the commercial roasters "excellent" orange might be better than my "very good" home-made apple, but if I prefer apples to oranges, and the roasters dont sell apples, then making my own apples is worthwhile.

    My tastes vary all the time, but I generally prefer single origins, particularly Ethiopians, and like a lighter roast than what most commercial roasters sell. If a good commercial roaster roasted the same batch of beans as me, to suit my tastes, Ive no doubt they could do a better job ... but they dont usually roast exactly what I would roast. If I want a 3 day old Sidamo Guji roasted slowly as a single origin to the first snaps of SC, and perhaps blended with a 9 day old version of the same, I need to do it myself. Likewise, a 14-21 day old Monsooned Malabar roasted to my idea of perfection isnt something Ive ever seen for sale.

    Having said that, I sometimes buy a blend from one of the great roasters we are blessed with here in Perth, and I thoroughly enjoy them. But then I return to my custom-made home roasts, where I am free to cater just to my own idiosyncracies and tastes. It depends on what floats your boat, and how specific your tastes are.

  36. #36
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Great post oily, I think you have summed up why a big proportion of home roasters do so.
    Like you I dont like overdone beans and usually pull my roasts just before/on/or just after second crack depending on bean type.
    Ive got good profiles of my favourite beans and can reliably repeat those roasts as required.

  37. #37
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    It is me John, I live in America. I got started home roasting after a specialty roaster burned me for over $100.00 (by burning the coffee and not taking responsibilty). I did not even drink coffee at that time, I got it for my wife. After trying home roasting, I now drink coffee. I home roasted in an oven, in a hot air popper, I modified a stir crazy turbo oven, I discovered, thanks to coffee snobs, the coretto. Thanks. There may be hundreds of small batch commercial roasters in Australia. Apparantly not so in the States. St**** is popular here with the most horrible coffee I have ever drank. I may not be able to compete with every commercial roaster, but not every commercial roaster is the same. My coffee is excellent. Even in the crappy 150"F coffee maker atr work it tastes better. Try home roasting. It is a bargain. I am better now than when I started. Am I going to put anyone out of business? No. And we also have are Sweet Marias with the best price/value/selection For me here in America. Did not mean to start any he said/she said discussions. But thanks for the coretto idea and direction. The damn thing works great. John

  38. #38
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    One thing that I think is worth pointing out to those justifying home roasting is that I often read statements along the lines of "roasted coffee costs me $40/kg, green its $20/kg therefore home roasting is half the cost!" Well, not exactly. The green beans lose a significant amount of weight when roasted (20-30%???, I just measured 20% on some just roasted) so you cant directly compare the two prices/weights. The other thing is, even DIY roasting equipment is rarely completely free. It seems most, if not all, roasting pushes equipment to, or often beyond its design limits and that has an affect on the equipments life span. Not bagging the process just trying to keep it in perspective.

    Pete

  39. #39
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Hi Pete
    I agree you need to add the additional cost of roasting equipment etc to get a true indication of the cost of home roasting but even when i do this i still save a great deal of money.

    When i can purchase green beans from a local roaster for $8.50/KG and loose 16% in roasting it still equates to about $10.00/kg green for the full roasted equivalent.

    Yes my roasting equipment all up has probably cost about $250 (an excessive figure but an estimate on the high side) but over the last two years have consistently been roasting about 1KG of green each week. To cost this at the quoted rate of of $40/kg would give a total figure of $3,600 approx to purchase the equivalent in pre roasted.

    I have used the same equipment for the last two years and i suspect it will run easily for the next two years as well.

    I have spent know where near this on equipment or green beans, so on costs alone its a huge reason to home roast even before you add the benefits of fresh beans on tap, acheivements in roasting, etc. etc.

    For me its in perspective.

    Mal

  40. #40
    Senior Member ozscott's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    ...very good. Yet to have a better coffee than that which I roast at home and run through the Mazzer/Faema combo. I try to keep an open mind. Its not just me either, its my family and friends who regularly go to very good shops including site sponsors. I am just being honest about this even if it sounds a tad egotistical.

    Cheers

  41. #41
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Pete 20-30% is excessive.
    Can be as low as 13%.
    Lately, using a profile from Mal Ive managed to get from my average of 16.4% down to 15%.

    I have 3 BMs which cost me $10 for one and $0 for each of the other two.

    My main costs have been heat guns and beans.

    I recently picked up a couple of the Aldi HGs for $20 each as I had one previously and Im used to controlling it, as well as my mounting setup being very compatible with the gun shape.

    To me the beans are the cheapest part of the equation and as bolb said, when factoring the equipment cost over the long term, the overall cost savings are increased.

    Im out of work at the moment but at my last place of employment I roasted a little for some of the guys and what they paid me for the occasional bag, let me roast and drink my coffee for free.

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    As you guys may have figured by now, I am playing Devils advocate with this a bit. Nevertheless I very often read of people simply comparing the cost of roasted/green and dividing by 2, and just thought Id point out that so often we lose track of "oh just a bit here, and a switch there". Anyone who has done any house renovations knows exactly what Im talking about :(

  43. #43
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Understood Pete.
    Sometimes we need to restate the bleedin obvious for the benefit of newbs.

  44. #44
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Why do people never factor in the cost of their time when home roasting?

    I suppose that its implicit that regular roasters enjoy it, but if you are trying to use cost to sway someone who doesnt home roast, I dont think that you can make that assumption. *Even valuing my time at the majestic rates that I commanded working part time as a uni student, home roasting works out to be more expensive than buying brown. *The equation tips if a roastery isnt located anywhere convenient for you, but remember that the maximum that you should allow for time to pick up roasted coffee is the cost of postage ... which doesnt actually work out to be that much if you buy two lots at once and freeze one.

    Similarly, why dont people make more of an allowance for the cost of mistakes?

    It takes a fair bit of roasting to work out how to produce something decent. *If you get great results on your first roast, you are either very lucky or your standards are lower than they ought to be.

    There are a lot of good arguments for home roasting, but I dont think that cost is really a tenable argument to someone who regards roasting as a chore. *(And if you are one of the legions of members of this web page who love the zen of roasting, why stop at home roasting; why not pay a pro roaster for the pleasure of taking their 22kg probat for a spin? ;P)

    Ill make one quick and unrelated point on the subject - I think that home roasting is a much more attractive proposition for people making brewed coffee than for people making espresso. *Its a fair generalisation to say that most Australian roasters roast everything for espresso and it can be challenging to find truly excellent roasts for brewed coffee. *That is starting to change and I am very grateful. *Theres a lot to be said for starting to roast coffee only for french press, syphon, etc; I think that you probably have more margin for error than roasting for espresso and the results will probably compare more favourably to what you can buy in shops purely because you will stop the roast at a level that is more suited for your intended brewing method. *Roasting for brewed coffee also probably makes it easier to develop an appreciation for the diversity of single origins, seeing as the brewing methods are less influential on the finished cup than espresso and the roast is not taken to a level where roast flavours begin to dominate origin flavours. *Newbies who insist on learning to home roast and make espresso at the same time are doomed to fail. *But why not learn to roast for brewed coffee whilst teaching yourself espresso using a decent commercial blend?

    Cheers,

    Luca

  45. #45
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Luca - I learned to roast at home and to make espresso at the same time - although I also used good local roasted coffee every so often and from various places for a while to make sure I had a handle on things - so point taken. Didnt take long to wince when handing over cash for roasted beans...

    Cheers

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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by ozscott link=1230245340/40#44 date=1231053493
    Luca - I learned to roast at home and to make espresso at the same time - although I also used good local roasted coffee every so often and from various places for a while to make sure I had a handle on things - so point taken. *Didnt take long to wince when handing over cash for roasted beans...
    Yeah, youll get there in the end and making sure that you had a good frame of reference was a clever feature of your way of doing it. But I view it like this; the object is to get yourself drinking good coffee as soon as possible. The best way to do that is to minimise the variables in any drink that you are preparing to something that you can control and understand. Andrew at The Maling Room has become a better and better trainer over the years, to the point where his latest proteges have gone from knowing literally next to nothing about coffee to pulling great shots and pouring better latte art than I can - perhaps not a great yardstick - in a matter of weeks. The secret - and I use the term loosely - is repetition of the same tasks; just making espresso with one blend for a shift or only steaming milk.

    Trying to change blends, roast levels, doses, etc, all at once is simply trying to run before you can walk. Either way will get you to your goal, but why arrive late with grazes on your hands and knees when if you take it easy at the beginning you can enjoy a nice stroll?

    Cheers,

    Luca

  47. #47
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Why do people never factor in the cost of their time when home roasting?
    The same can be said for costs of your time in $ value and vehicle running costs driving to your favourite roaster
    Or delivery costs if delivery is the method you use

    Similarly, why dont people make more of an allowance for the cost of mistakes?
    With regards to mistakes yes it does happen but not on such a large scale to alter the maths

    I cant comment on your other points because the only other brewing method I use other than espresso is Greek?Turkish coffee

    I like my roasts, my family and friends like my roasts and that is all that matters It is as simple as that

    There are a lot of good arguments for home roasting, but I dont think that cost is really a tenable argument to someone who regards roasting as a chore. (And if you are one of the legions of members of this web page who love the zen of roasting, why stop at home roasting; why not pay a pro roaster for the pleasure of taking their 22kg probat for a spin? ;P)
    I will give it a try when Veneziano get there roast your own beans roaster up and running in Brisbane but I dont know if it will be a 22 kg probat ?

    Luca I would like to know
    Have you ever home roasted yourself

    KK




  48. #48
    Senior Member ozscott's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Yep - agreed Luca. I usually roast a big batch and then use that coffee to death.

    Cheers


  49. #49
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by ozscott link=1230245340/20#39 date=1231026859
    ...very good. Yet to have a better coffee than that which I roast at home and run through the Mazzer/Faema combo. I try to keep an open mind. Its not just me either, its my family and friends who regularly go to very good shops including site sponsors. I am just being honest about this even if it sounds a tad egotistical.
    I had a laugh.... ;D [smiley=laugh.gif]

    Same here mate. Probably got a lot do with having the time to fiddle around with SOs to get them roasted just so and when blending; I dont know how much time Ive put into that over the years Ive been roasting here at home, but the efforts worth it in the end.

    Just going back to some of the other comments in posts above re: cost...
    This was never the inspirational factor for me at all as I have always been prepared to spend what ever was required to get a decent coffee. Initially, it was just out of curiosity, to see if I could do it (home roast) while achieving at least a half decent outcome. After a few botched attempts which includes a couple of small fires that had me dancing around a bit (used a s/s bowl and gas torch to start out with - its what I had available around the house ;)), I eventually decided that subsequent roasts were good enough for me to stick with this for a while. Thats when I lashed out and bought a popper ::)....

    Personally, I think the cost issue is just a secondary benefit sitting well behind the fun, control and satisfaction one receives from this very interesting aspect of the whole, culminating in being able to drink the best coffee at home that one can. We live in a rural area with the nearest decent coffee being a loooonnnnnggg way away from home if we didnt do our own thing. I just love great coffee too much to have to wait that long between drinks and home roasting goes a long way to allowing me to achieve my desires.

    Very happy little home roaster here, I assure you all..... [smiley=happy.gif]

    Mal.

  50. #50
    Senior Member ozscott's Avatar
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    Re: Just how good is home roasting?

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Gday Mal. Its interesting that you mention blending. I am a long way behind you mate, and have only been doing single origin beans...but even those are smoother and nicer than blends that I have tried at very reputable coffee houses in Brisbane. At some stage I would like to get into blending, but just love good single origin coffees, and have not got the blending skill yet.

    I should elaborate from my post above, that its not just friends (eg p_issing in my pocket) that comment about the coffee however - I have made single origin coffees for complete strangers from short blacks to lates and the comments are always the same. I am far from the knowledge that someone like Mal has, so my point is that if I can produce consistent cups of this quality, imagine what you can do with many years of experience and honing!

    Cheers



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