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Thread: Coffee Roasters Handbook

  1. #1
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I have done some searching on the web and found it difficult to find a coffee roasters handbook
    However there is plenty of information for baristas

    I am after something that will give an overview and then continue on to describe heat increments for each minute
    And importantly how to create bean profiles controlled by a progressive heat graph or curve

    I have found basic info at sweet marias and other sites but nothing descriptive and in-depth

    So the question is do such books exist?
    And if so I need names & authors to chase them up

    I may need to twist Peters hand at Veneziano Brisbane to learn some roasting while I provide free labour

    KK



  2. #2
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Not sure how technical this gets as I havent got a copy YET, but the review peaked my curiosity ...

    http://www.scaa.org/shop/product_detail.asp?productid=R200100

    The Coffee Cuppers Handbook, Ted Lingle

    a review by Luca Costanzo http://pourquality.blogspot.com/

    Quote
    This is a must have for anyone who cups on any semi-serious level. I would be shocked - shocked - if anyone who purported to call themselves a professional roaster did not own a copy of this book.

    The book itself is unashamedly technical and dry. It isnt a thrilling read, nor does it have Promethean tendencies to illuminate the art, but it does make for an extremely useable reference.

    Who should buy it: Serious cuppers. And, to borrow a phrase from Derryn Hinch, if you call yourself a professional roaster and you dont own a copy - shame, shame, shame.
    unquote
    ;D

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Quote Originally Posted by 4753794214260 link=1232283238/1#1 date=1232332394
    if you call yourself a professional roaster and you dont own a copy - shame, shame, shame.
    Are you for real? If you havent got your copy yet how do you know its a "must have"? Be prepared to get shocked. I have no idea if the book is good, bad, or inbetween, but this pro-roaster doesnt have a copy and not likely to get one soon. :P


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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Hi Dennis,

    au_d2 was quoting Lucas review on the blogspot..."This is a must have...etc. etc."

    A little confusing. At first I too thought it was his own opinion, but then I checked the link. Quotations might have been useful!

    sd

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Im always interested in coffee books. Can anyone tell me where to buy it in aus? Otherwise maybe a sponsor would like to get some in - id get it as long as reasonably priced.

  6. #6
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Hmmm,

    Never found anything in book form but the various guides (with links to others) to be found on the "Coffee Research Organisation" website are very helpful. Heres the link to the beginning of the Roasting section in case you havent visited before... http://www.coffeeresearch.org/coffee/roasting.htm

    Cheers,
    Mal.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Thank you all

    Not sure how technical this gets as I havent got a copy YET, but the review peaked my curiosity ...
    I went and had a wee look at the site and read Lucas comments
    However while on the book link site I found this gem Under the training materials classification
    Anyone familiar with this book??

    The Roasting Concepts
    http://www.scaa.org/shop/product_detail.asp?productid=R201900

    Quote Originally Posted by 567B7F737E120 link=1232283238/5#5 date=1232358542
    Hmmm,

    Never found anything in book form but the various guides (with links to others) to be found on the "Coffee Research Organisation" website are very helpful. Heres the link to the beginning of the Roasting section in case you havent visited before... http://www.coffeeresearch.org/coffee/roasting.htm

    Cheers,
    Mal.
    Thanks Mal
    I had a close look at this site
    I have been to it in the past and just skimmed over it
    a little judicious reading is in order

    KK



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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    My favorite right now is www.bootcoffee.com/articles.html

    CHAD

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Quote Originally Posted by 4A5C5C5D5550575E4A390 link=1232283238/7#7 date=1232380209
    My favorite right now is www.bootcoffee.com/articles.html

    CHAD
    This is good! Roastin aint roastin...

  10. #10
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Yep, Boot is good.... ;D

    Mal.

  11. #11
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    As a side note Boot has one of the only two sister machines that Ive been able to locate (the other one is in Probats museum) of my early 1950s 3-barrel Gothot. :)


    Java "Roasting up a storm" phile


  12. #12
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    I have had a good read of both recommendations of online sources
    from Mal & Chad

    I am a little wiser now but practice will make it [s]perfect[/s] better

    Quote Originally Posted by 062D3A2D3C242520294C0 link=1232283238/10#10 date=1232694528
    As a side note Boot has one of the only two sister machines that Ive been able to locate (the other one is in Probats museum) of my early 1950s 3-barrel Gothot. :)
    Java "Roasting up a storm" phile

    I will christen them the 3 sisters :)

    KK

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    With most of our hybrid homebuilds you really need to learn how the beans are absorbing heat. The heat transfer abilities and limitations of a specific roaster. Large drum roaster have considerations such as stored energy that might not be an issue in one of our roasters. I think its more about the chemistry of roasting http://www.sweetmarias.com/roast.carlstaub.html
    Your curve may differ,
    farm

  14. #14
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Thanks Ed
    This is a great article and I seem to understand it all
    I have read this article several times and I agree it is a balancing act

    Our roasters are different in the way they work
    I can however follow just about any roast curve

    I find it better to use the thermocouple as a guide for time over temp
    But I let the bean tell me whats right
    Thats the beauty of the turbo roaster you can see the bean changing before your eyes
    My First Cracks almost always start between 9 min and 12 min and I am pretty happy with that
    But the evenness of the roast to second crack I attribute that to the constant visual contact I have with that roast and a certain smell that gives me a cue
    Its hard to explain that smell but I know when its just right

    So in essence I currently use a little of both science and gut feeling with a little help from my senses

    The test roast results speak for themselves

    Keep the information coming as I do read it all

    Regards
    KK


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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    General tips for roasting general categories would be helpful:

    1) High-grown
    2) Hard Bean
    3) Dry Process
    4) Wet Process
    5) Low-grown

    I heat low-grown and wet-process coffees with more gradual ramps and lower temps until first crack than the others listed. Thats about as specific as I get.

    The heatgun-breadmaker is a bit of a jack-of-all-trades with regard to profiles. It can be heated very fast, very slow, and everywhere in between.

    CHAD

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Impressed with bootcoffee. Turning art into science

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Quote Originally Posted by 25040F0F0812610 link=1232283238/2#2 date=1232342040
    Are you for real? *If you havent got your copy yet how do you know its a "must have"? *Be prepared to get shocked. *I have no idea if the book is good, bad, or inbetween, but this pro-roaster doesnt have a copy and not likely to get one soon. * :P
    Hmmm ... ;P

    Cheers,

    Luca

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Not that it matters, but I intend to stay unprofessional. I dont have a copy.

    CHAD

  19. #19
    Senior Member summercrema's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Mal,

    The link provides a good read for me, thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5C71757974180 link=1232283238/5#5 date=1232358542
    Hmmm,

    Never found anything in book form but the various guides (with links to others) to be found on the "Coffee Research Organisation" website are very helpful. Heres the link to the beginning of the Roasting section in case you havent visited before... http://www.coffeeresearch.org/coffee/roasting.htm

    Cheers,
    Mal.

  20. #20
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Quote Originally Posted by 4753794214260 link=1232283238/1#1 date=1232332394
    http://www.scaa.org/shop/product_detail.asp?productid=R200100

    The Coffee Cuppers Handbook, Ted Lingle
    Interestingly, Peter Wolff showed us this book at the cupping session on Saturday morning at Veneziano First Pour Brisbane as a good example of further informaiton for those of us who might be interested.

    Has anybody seen it outside of the SCAA store?

    cheers,
    James

  21. #21
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Quote Originally Posted by 4E5858595154535A4E3D0 link=1232283238/17#17 date=1233093387
    Not that it matters, but I intend to stay unprofessional. *I dont have a copy.
    Prompted by a recent thread linking to this, I thought that I should come in and do some splaining of my thinking.

    You arent a professional. *You are a home roaster. *Your needs and responsibilities are not the same as a professional roasters. *Roasters cup for two main reasons; to select green to buy and to maintain quality. *

    Green selection is an extraordinarily important part of roasting. *The Australian green coffee market is serviced by a relatively small number of firms who, nonetheless, do a pretty good job of supplying everyone in the brown coffee market, from the most budget conscious to the most quality conscious. *This implies that many importers will have a large spectrum of offerings of varying quality to choose from, which, as far as I know, turns out to be the case for most of them. *Importers, just like roasters, vary in their ability and willingness to recommend recommend high quality coffee to roasters consistently. *I dont deal with importers much and Im sure that by and large they do the best job that they can, but occasional bad bags slip through, just as they do with roasters selling to anyone. *This means that for any roaster to have a good shot at providing consistently good coffee to their customer, they must either be good cuppers or source their coffee through good cuppers. *If they do the latter, I suspect that you will probably do a better job by going to a roaster who cups for themselves, as they will be better at cupping to maintain quality. *All of this aside, the plain and simple fact is that as a home roaster you probably do not get a chance to cup coffee in order to select it. *You probably rely on someone like Andy to do this for you. *(And why not?)

    Maintenance of quality is another important part of roasting. *If roasters bother to do it, cupping at some stage after roasting and before sale can help to ensure that customers are presented with a consistent - consistently good in the market in which most of us are interested, I hope - product. *Cupping at this stage requires a bit of knowledge of how the coffee is going to change before the customer gets it and how the coffee will taste in the brewing method through which it will be used, with cupping for espresso requiring particular imagination! *The main issue faced by professional roasters here and probably not faced by domestic roasters is cupping multiple batches of the same roast with the static expectations of the consumer in mind as opposed to the home roasters curiosity in mind.

    So there are quite large differences in cupping as a home roaster and as a professional roaster. *As a home roaster, you for fun, to learn and probably without any particular end in mind. *As a professional roaster, you cup to source coffee, to ensure roast consistency and to live up to the obligation and responsibility that you have to your customer to deliver a product of a consistent high quality (either with reference to all coffee available on the market or all coffee available at the price point). *Unfortunately, the brown coffee market isnt really regulated and the full spectrum of coffee, from absolutely undrinkable to positively divine, seems to be legitimately accepted as being of vendible quality. *Anyone can buy a roaster, turn green beans brown, put up a sign or a web page with a bunch of buzz words and call themselves a professional roaster. *This means that the responsibility of providing a customer with a consistently high quality product is one that roasters really have to assume themselves.

    The upshot of all of this is that the book isnt a great value proposition for a home roaster. *For a professional roaster, however, the cash you get from selling a couple of kilos of coffee gets you the industrys leading text on one of the most important technical skills in your profession ... and its tax deductible! *

    Professional strikes me as a word thats banded about a lot without a lot of meaning attached to it, but I think that its pretty uncontroversial to say that most professionals would be expected by their peers to have access to the leading text in their area. *If coffee roasters expect the public to respect them as professionals and acknowledge that they have particular skills, one of the things that goes with that is an obligation to possess those skills and to invest in ones own learning in the field. *In this instance, professional roasters are lucky that the leading text in the area costs an absolutely piddling amount in comparison with the leading texts in other areas.

    Now none of this is to say that you cant roast and sell decent coffee if you dont own this book. But, then again, theres nothing stopping your surgeon from doing their job without a copy of Grays Anatomy (or whatever those crazy kids refer to these days) or your lawyer from doing their job without a copy of their relevant looseleaf service.

    Cheers,

    Luca

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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook


    Luca, youve presented such a convincing argument that Ive just ordered a copy!

    Can I add that my preferential learning style is kinaesthetic, which like all singular learning styles can have its shortcomings if used exclusively. So of course I dont exclude texts, etc. but struggle when someone denounces roasters because they dont own or utilise a particular text. It smacks of elitism to me.

    When I set off with the ambition to become a professional roaster I am the first to admit that some, no many, of the poor little beans suffered an ignominious end. I am embarrassed to say that my early customers, and even you, were subjected to some pretty mediocre results.

    If I had continued along that path I would expect that I would be out of business today. Instead, I sought the help and advice of other Roasters, and they generously assisted me to develop an outcome that Im now pretty happy with, though always looking for ways to improve.

    Im surrounded by agtron tiles, Le Nez kit, volumes of readings, and defect samples. I dont have a spectophotrometer and even if I did, of course, none of these things would ever make me a good roaster. With no disrespect intended, a parallel example might be where Ive visited lawyers chambers. They often sit in front of a wall filled with texts and journals, giving the impression that they are omnipotent. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth.

    So who am I to trust? Well, I have in the main put my trust in myself and as a result, am generally well-caffeinated. If I can glean just one idea that either confirms or conflicts with my own point of view, whether it be from a text, or a customer, a supplier, or one of my own tastings/cuppings then this is what excites me.

    When I entered the Golden Bean awards last year I never expected to win a medal, let alone two. I entered, naively hoping for some feedback that might help me improve what I do. A day doesnt pass where Im not looking for feedback - in the facial expressions of my customers as they take the first sip, the comments I receive, or the aroma, feel, and taste of each and every coffee I roast, prepare, or taste.

    Roasting is my profession.

    Cheers!


  23. #23
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee Roasters Handbook

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Excellently stated Dennis.... Bravo mate [smiley=tekst-toppie.gif]

    Mal.



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