Results 1 to 27 of 27

Thread: Advice of getting into home roasting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    37

    Advice of getting into home roasting

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi guys,
    I wanted some advice on whether it was worth my whiel getting into home raosting.

    I tried roasting at home with a popcorn machine about 2 years ago.

    I enjoyed getting to know the beans,a nd all the aspects of the process.
    the problem was that i couldnt get any repeatability at all with the popper. The length of the cord, temp, all made repeatability impossible.

    I was not experienced enough to pick up the second crack over the noise of the popper, so I just got charcoal beans most of the time, or under roasted acid beans!!!!!!!!

    I was hoping to get some advice on the ease of use, and the learning curve required for a Gene Cafe.

    I would love to get back into it, but it need to be able to get repeatability from the amchine, so that each batch can add to my knowledge.

    Any advice welcome.

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    4,125

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Is it worth it? On economic grounds alone, yes. Also tick the yes box for a fulfilling and rewarding hobby.

    I dont use a Gene cafe but I dont see too many complaints from GC users. From what Ive noticed on CoffeeSnobs, for faster cooling of the roast, many prefera cooling method other than the GC cooling cycle.

    Consider volumes as well. You are limited to 200-250g per roast on the GC. If you have a high demand, you might want to go for something larger capacity like a corretto or a KKTO.

    Think also location. If you live in a unit block, a GC or HotTop might be preferable to reduce any nuisance factors.

    The best advice I can offer is, if you are considering it, just work out what you want and get into it. It will take some patience - dont expect brilliant results first up (but dont discount it either)

  3. #3
    A_M
    A_M is offline
    Guest
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    6,381

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 7C766374747B6F691A0 link=1259285755/1#1 date=1259286677
    Is it worth it? On economic grounds alone, yes. Also tick the yes box for a fulfilling and rewarding hobby.

    I dont use *a Gene cafe but I dont *see too many complaints from GC users. From what Ive noticed on CoffeeSnobs, for faster cooling of the roast, many prefera cooling method other than the GC cooling cycle.

    Consider volumes as well. You are limited to 200-250g per roast on the GC. If you have a high demand, *you might want to go for something larger capacity like a corretto or a KKTO.

    Think also location. If you live in a unit block, a GC or HotTop might be preferable to reduce any nuisance factors.

    The best advice I can offer is, if you are considering it, just work out what you want and get into it. *It will take some patience - dont expect brilliant results first up (but dont discount it either)
    Agree fully..

    Update ya profile with ya location... Could be a CSs home roaster just around teh corner...

  4. #4
    Senior Member speleomike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    942

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Hi Apple

    I got a GeneCafe over two years ago and its been used nearly every weekend or 2nd weekend since. A roast in it for a given bean batch IS reproducible and it makes good roasts.

    Repoducibility: Means I can do a 250 gm roast and decide after cupping it or just trying it in my machine whether to reduce/increase the roast time by 1 minute or so. Hence I can tweek how my roasts are without other factors coming into play. I can go back and do another batch 6 months later with the same Gene start temperature and time and the roast will come out the same. (Assuming the room temp is about the same. If it was 15C in Winter and 30C in summer that will make a slight difference.)

    Flexibility: A Gene is less flexible than a Corretto. The later would allow more fiddling with temperature, airflow and other variables, and be able to do bigger batches but with all those variables its probably harder to achieve reproducibility. There is a trade-off there.

    Cost: My Gene paid for itself in less than a year as I was buying green beans at ~$10/kg instead of brown ones at ~$40/kg and I was doing 1/2 kg a week.

    Either a Gene or a Hottop would probably suit you if you want as nice reproducible system. Its a nice step up from a popper. CSers and site sponsors here will help you to decide on a Gene or a Hottop.

    Mike

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    37

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Thanks guys, but my next question is.......................whats a Corretto, and whats a KKTO????????

    Im located in the inner eastern suburbs of melbourne.

    I know that theres a get together in Abbottsford every so often, so that might be the place to go.

    Also, what difference to flavour does de-gassing have, and how long should you de-gas for?
    Most people seem to nominate 5-7days, but its that just a waste of all that fluffy crema?

    Cheers



  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,756

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    hava a look at the top of the roasters section, there is a sticky for both, tonnes of info, both are great fun! and produce amazing results!

  7. #7
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,288

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Gene is fairly easy to use, and there is now a resource locally of times, temperatures, and techniques to speed up the process of learning. Mind you, I was getting very nice roasts from roast #1.

    Also see Andys latest post on the Behmor--it sounds as though these might be available shortly.

    Greg

  8. #8
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northen Rivers
    Posts
    659

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 6756564A43260 link=1259285755/4#4 date=1259288570
    and how long should you de-gas for?
    Most people seem to nominate 5-7days, but its that just a waste of all that fluffy crema?
    All that fluffy crema you talk about quickly dissappears if not consumed straight away Apple. It can also be a little bit deceiving as to how long your shot actually is.

    So by letting your beans degas for a little as 2 days, you get a more stable crema and some of the more suttle taste differences come through.

    Coretto = heavily modded bread maker combined with a heat gun.

    KKTO is a not so crazy invention made by our very own Kosmo in Brisbane ...find his thread and check it out!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Coffee2Di4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Ipswich, QLD
    Posts
    1,472

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Another Jenny fan here...got mine about 3 weeks ago and have been doing batches in it every couple of days (also roasting for some of my workmates / mum, etc).

    Prior to the Gene, I wok roasted on a BBQ which was great - fairly reasonably reproduceable, but very manual and there was no walking away once you started.

    I got my Gene second hand for a really great price and its worth every cent I paid for it. At this stage, cant see myself really wanting or needing to go to anything else (famous last words!!! ;) )

    Size of roast is not an issue - I just do two batches back to back (with about 30 minutes in between for everything to cool down but, unlike the wok, I can take my eyes off it for a minute or two at a time - if Im not mesmerised by those little green beans rolling around changing colour, that is!

    Cheers
    Di

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    433

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    I was adimantly in the "roastings not for me" bracket up until about 3 - 4 months ago, now, there is no going back.

    I used to buy brown from various local suppliers, all of whom provided nice beans, each with their own flavour characteristics etc, but I would quickly become bored with them. Even rotating suppliers every month or so just didnt cut it in the end.

    Got some cash for my Bday this year, and indulged in a BM and heatgun and bought a few kgs of green.

    I now have about 12kgs of green in the cupboard, some Costa Rican SHB, Sumartran Mandheling and Columbian Excelso. Have also tried Yirg, Harrar, Kenyan and Honduras. There is still some beans I have yet to try (Tanzanian Peaberry that sounds interesting) but I cant see myself buyng brown for quite some time to come.

    Im fortunate enough to not have to worry about neighbours in a block etc, so the corretto solution may not suit everyone, but for an investment under $100, its not a lot of money to part with to "see if Roasting is for you"

    Sen

  11. #11
    Senior Member Pavoniboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Minnamurra NSW
    Posts
    693

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Is it worthwhile?
    Hell, yes. I would suggest there is a high probability you will never look back.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    5,113

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    To many win - win scenarios going for it that its a no contest

    Home roasting rules [smiley=thumbup.gif] [smiley=tekst-toppie.gif]

    KK

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    366

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Endorse all of the above. To answer your question.....a simple DO IT will suffice. I dont know abut the GC, but having the variety of green beans in my cupboard at a quarter of brown price makes my HT purchase worthwhile.

  14. #14
    brett230873
    Guest

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Home roasting allows me to laud my snobbiness over all of my family, friends, the postman, anyone who is dumb enough to listen.... It is surely as much a part of the journey because you can experience first hand the process and the development of the beans, their character, flavours etc from 1 second post roast to ~.

    The next step in the progression is obviously to grow and process and that is my next challenge..... telling my wife that her days of Vines and Roses is coming to an end! My next post may be much higher pitched!

    Get into the roasting! Youll save money (not initially) and develop your skills, understanding and pallet. If we werent excited about the journey and higher learning we wouldnt need CoffeeSnobs!

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,165

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    I was in the same boat as you Apple; very happy with the pre-roasted stuff Id used before then, tried a corretto but it didnt do it for me due to the wrong type of breadmaker used for the project. I now use a Hottop. Why home roast? (theres a thread on that exact subject by the way...)

    * its cheaper buying green beans (you can get 1kg of green for about the cost of 250g of good roasted coffee)
    * greens last a lot longer in storage than roasted coffee (3 years rather than 3 weeks, nominally)
    * theres no excuse to have stale coffee with a ready supply of roasted fresh
    * but more than anything it helps you learn more about the whole process and lets you roast coffee to suit your palate

    As to which roaster, given your experiences with a popper I wouldnt bother with an iRoast as thats basically the same idea. Definitely look at a Corretto or a KKTO and see if youd be interested in those. If you decide to go for a dedicated product as I did, the Behmor, Gene Cafe and Hottop are the three more readily available proper roasters in order of price, and with the bigger dollars normally comes greater control over the roast.

    Each product has its pros and cons; I did a side by side on the Gene Cafe and the Hottop a couple of years ago when I was still playing around with them (before I even considered selling the Hottops by the way), which is at http://www.coffeetamper.com.au/kb/reviews/gene-hottop/ which Id recommend you read - youll read comments on this forum in support of both products and while theyre valuable for gauging owner satisfaction remember that few of those comments are from people who have actually used both products. If 100 people have a xyz widget and rave about it, does that suddenly make it better than the abc widget?

    Greg

  16. #16
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northen Rivers
    Posts
    659

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 2C392E2C3B3E2727262A254B0 link=1259285755/14#14 date=1259539882
    If 100 people have a xyz widget and rave about it, does that suddenly make it better than the abc widget?
    Im more a fan of the QRS widget with the added thingamajiggie and modded whatsamacallit.

    But seriously, im glad i purchased a Hottop and am still learning a bit about roasting. Think i might pick up a Behmor just because of the "cant beat it" pricing.

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    16

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Hi All,

    A few comments above talk about the gene or hottop being the better solution vs the corretto if your in a close living situation.

    would it be fair to assume then that the gene and hottop can be used inside without smoking out the house? Ive seen plenty of vids on utube and yes, the machines are being used indoors but is this really something that you can do long term without making the curtains brown and the walls reek of roasting coffee?

    BTY - long time listener, first time caller - please be gentle :)

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,756

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    I personally wouldnt do it, even with an external exhaust range hood, thats just me though, the smoke has to go somewhere, has to, so that = dirty walls and curtains to me, in time.
    Remember thats my humble opinion, not everyones ;)

  19. #19
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    7,036

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 5F607A6A6C7B68090 link=1259285755/16#16 date=1260666194
    Hi All,

    A few comments above talk about the gene or hottop being the better solution vs the corretto if your in a close living situation.

    would it be fair to assume then that the gene and hottop can be used inside without smoking out the house? Ive seen plenty of vids on utube and yes, the machines are being used indoors but is this really something that you can do long term without making the curtains brown and the walls reek of roasting coffee?

    BTY - long time listener, first time caller - please be gentle *:)
    Your right the Corretto is a smoky beast, works fine out doors or in the shed with a window open and a fan strategically placed.
    Pretty sure GregWormald (see post earlier in this thread) uses a Gene indoors, his walls certainly werent brown nor did his house reek of roasting coffee, PM him with the question hes a real helpful bloke. ;)

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    76

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 5C6379696F786B0A0 link=1259285755/16#16 date=1260666194
    would it be fair to assume then that the gene and hottop can be used inside without smoking out the house?
    Ive now been roasting for a massive 2 weeks!! Even with my newbie status, Im enjoying some of the best coffee of my life. Im using a Gene under the patio, but I dont see enough smoke to think this couldnt be done inside.
    The good thing about the Gene is you can purchase a larger chaff collector which has a connection that would allow you to connect a pipe and direct the smoke out of the closest window.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Lizzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bridport, Tas
    Posts
    1,151

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    hi guys...
    the gene CAN be used inside.. i used it inside our motorhome.
    take one panel ( or the whole lot, if not in two pieces) of the grease filter out of the rangehood, so you have access to the fan.

    sit the gene on a breadboard on top of the stove, fit the large chaff collector, with a pvc "flue" (90mm with adaptor) or piece of flexible alu rangehood-flue leading directly INTO the rangehood cavity, next to/immediately under the fan.

    rangehood fan on "low" allows you to hear FC and SC with ease.
    only drawback: the inside of the rangehood will, over time, turn a beautiful shade of burnt yellow!! ;)

    good luck!

    cheers,
    L

  22. #22
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northen Rivers
    Posts
    659

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    I would strongly suggest NOT using a Hottop inddors.

    I used it the first day i got it in the kitchen with all the windows open but nothing could have prepared me for the amount of smoke that comes out of the ejected beans on cooling.

    It might be possible to do it under a good quality rangehood but i wouldnt do it.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,165

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 767F6E6E77767F6E6E771E0 link=1259285755/19#19 date=1260668790
    Ive now been roasting for a massive 2 weeks!! Even with my newbie status, Im enjoying some of the best coffee of my life. Im using a Gene under the patio, but I dont see enough smoke to think this couldnt be done inside.
    Guess again Happi. The smoke may not be that obvious out of doors but when youre in a confined space youll certainly notice it. See Luke Gs post above, and thats with a Hottop that has smoke filtering so just imagine a whole roast without a smoke filter!

    The bottom line is that coffee beans produce a fair bit of smoke when theyre roasted and as WSully said you have to do *something* with all that smoke. Whether its being pumped out for the last five minutes of the roast cycle (Gene Cafe) or for 60 seconds after you eject (Hottop) its still smoke and in reasonable volumes, so you need to roast either under an efficient rangehood or undercover outdoors IMHO. For a rangehood to produce enough suction to be effective its likely to be on the noisy side so I always prefer the patio.

    Lizzis suggestion is a good alternative if youre a GC owner; from memory the large chaff collector is around $130 - but across 12 months in a motorhome thats a small cost for fresh coffee! ;D

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    76

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 223720223530292928242B450 link=1259285755/22#22 date=1260756824
    Guess again Happi.
    ;D funny you mention that Greg. I roasted 250g of Uganda this afternoon into SC. This was by far the smokiest roast Ive experienced. It also produced the most chaff Ive seen. I guess these two are related, yes?
    That was one roast Id definitely not want inside the house *:(

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    52

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by 132C3626203724450 link=1259285755/16#16 date=1260666194
    would it be fair to assume then that the gene and hottop can be used inside without smoking out the house?
    Hi apple,
    I have a Hottop and I roast inside and outside. But to answer your question, yes, roasting inside willl make your house smell a bit like a roastery but if you dont roast inside on a regular basis and keep windows and doors open when you do the smell does disburse quite quickly and isnt a major drama.

  26. #26
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northen Rivers
    Posts
    659

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    For video of the mentioned smoke...

    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-uTdUA0IUaA[/media]

  27. #27
    Senior Member GrahamK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ormiston - Brisbane
    Posts
    545

    Re: Advice of getting into home roasting

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    I use a Hottop in the kitchen under a std kitchen rangehood. I find luckily I only really need the rangehood right at the end when I eject, so the noise does not interfere with listening out for the Cracks.

    I Eject the beans, remove the Bean Insertion Chute Cover, and switch the rangehood fan to High and leave it on until the end of the cooling cycle. Most of the smoke seems to get sucked out of the Bean Insertion Chute, which hopefully means less strain on the Hottop fan and filter. I ensure I close all the internal doors around the kitchen, and although you can tell I have been roasting, it only lingers for a couple of hours. (or possibly I just become accustomed so stop smelling it) *;)

    Graham




Similar Threads

  1. Home roasting advice please !!
    By karl_2020 in forum Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21st November 2012, 08:35 PM
  2. home roasting into commercial roasting
    By drink1121 in forum Roasters
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 28th September 2012, 11:36 PM
  3. Home Roasting
    By Gra in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11th December 2008, 12:10 PM
  4. Want to start home roasting: equipment advice
    By chartres in forum Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25th November 2008, 08:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •