Results 1 to 22 of 22
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By Barry O'Speedwagon
  • 1 Post By Thundergod
  • 1 Post By danzx6r

Thread: Cost effectiveness of roasting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    86

    Cost effectiveness of roasting

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    New to roasting, but not so new to making coffee. I currently go through about 0.5kg a fortnight @ $22 per half kg. How long would it take to "pay back" the equipment required assuming I got something mid-range? Or generally speaking, is it something you do to be cost effective or do you guys all do it for the love of coffee?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,635
    Quote Originally Posted by garbage View Post
    New to roasting, but not so new to making coffee. I currently go through about 0.5kg a fortnight @ $22 per half kg. How long would it take to "pay back" the equipment required assuming I got something mid-range? Or generally speaking, is it something you do to be cost effective or do you guys all do it for the love of coffee?
    I reckon it would take you around a year to 14 months to pay back an i-coffee or Behmor (<$400ish), and almost 1.5-2years for a Gene Cafe. The HotTops and above obviously will take longer. Assumptions: cost of green beans (allowing for weight loss in roasting, and cheap postage $16 per kg), 2kgs a month usage (conservative, but gives you a margin for power used etc), leading to a monthly saving of approx. $28. YMMV, depending on choices like storage etc, what beans you like.

    Cost isn't the big issue for me (otherwise I wouldn't own 2 roasters), it's the fact that I can roast to order and always have fresh beans, and the fun of experimentation with roast depth, profiles and blends. I still buy brown beans occasionally (from Andy and Cosmorex).

    PS: Quite missing my roasting while working overseas....tempted to buy a popper, as I've found a source of greens.
    garbage likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member coffeechris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    727
    I started out with a popper then quickly moved to a Corretto set up. I never really looked at the cost invloved in setting it up and how long it may or may not take me to get my money back. Two things are for sure though. In the long/short run it will pay its self off (dependng on the set up you have or course) and secondly I do it for the love and enjoyment mainly.
    the one up side to the whole thing is i used to drink maybe 1 cup a day, i know drink 2-3 cups a day

  4. #4
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    10,496
    I'm the same regarding cost not being an issue.
    It's funny that in one of my very early posts I said I couldn't see myself roasting. I had a laugh.
    I too still buy roasted from trusted roasters.

    I also do it for the enjoyment I get doing it and the satisfaction of the control I have.
    That extends now to growing my own coffee trees (there my be another cost saving there for you).

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    12
    I'm with these guys, just do it for the taste and enjoyment I get out of doing it myself.

    I haven't bought from other roasters though, maybe if I lived near some...
    You only crunch the numbers to sell the idea to the other half
    Last edited by AlexAg; 23rd January 2013 at 09:46 AM. Reason: make gooderer english

  6. #6
    Senior Member coffeechris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    727
    In a good way i must say roasting coffee has taken over my life. I also thought when i joined up for some info on a couple of machines the last thing i would be doing is roasting coffee. Its the most enjoyable hobby i have ever had!!


  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    63
    Roasting is just like my beer brewing, it's not about cost, it's all about making the best product to my tastes and the satisfaction that brings.

  8. #8
    Senior Member David8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Annerley, QLD
    Posts
    559

    Cost effectiveness of roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by seamad View Post
    Roasting is just like my beer brewing, it's not about cost, it's all about making the best product to my tastes and the satisfaction that brings.
    This. Exactly. I set my coretto up really cheaply (<$100) for everything including a bean cooler. I'm sure I've paid it off by now. But that's not the point. I prefer my roasts to most of what I buy. This is because I roast the beans I like to the level I like. It's all about personal preference. =)

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Maddingley
    Posts
    222
    Quote Originally Posted by seamad View Post
    Roasting is just like my beer brewing, it's not about cost, it's all about making the best product to my tastes and the satisfaction that brings.
    For me cost was what pushed me across the line. I was in search for better coffee and it was costing $45 per kg and roasting works out much better and you also get the better quality. If the average is $14 per kg (inc delivery) even at a stretch with chaff loss, valve bag, electricity, machine wear and tear $20 per kg would be the max it costs me to roast so I am way ahead. I might be missing something but that is how I see it.

    * I have a Behmor.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAg View Post
    You only crunch the numbers to sell the idea to the other half
    Hahaha Couldn't agree more! The main motivation isn't cost, mainly because time is money, but it certainly is cheaper than buying roasted (+postage = waste), especially if you build your own roaster.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    150
    Cost for me was a bonus to help get the purchases across the line and approximate by the CFO.

    Like some of th earlier posts I buy from local roasters on occasion, but I find it more convenient to be able to duck out to the shed and roast up a batch as I see a need coming up. It's also a lot easier to do a small batch of something quirky or to try something unusual at home.

    The occasional gift to a fellow coffee lover also goes down a treat, kind of like a home made jam or pie.

  12. #12
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    10,496
    Quote Originally Posted by dan77 View Post
    For me cost was what pushed me across the line. I was in search for better coffee and it was costing $45 per kg and roasting works out much better and you also get the better quality. If the average is $14 per kg (inc delivery) even at a stretch with chaff loss, valve bag, electricity, machine wear and tear $20 per kg would be the max it costs me to roast so I am way ahead. I might be missing something but that is how I see it.

    * I have a Behmor.
    You can cut valved bag costs by using a small freezer bag as a liner. That way you don't dirty the inside of the bag, and providing you aren't heat sealing them can reuse many times over.
    Lazarus78 likes this.

  13. #13
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Millthorpe NSW
    Posts
    2,038
    Great challenge (initially), great results (finally), great hobby (still), great versatility (roast for your palette), great variety (no two batches the same!) and great savings (less than half the price - no matter how you add it up!).
    Love the roasting!
    Matt

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Central Coast NSW
    Posts
    684
    Has been the best learning curve for me in so many ways. A great way to learn much much more about coffee.

    As for costs, my heat gun cost me $40 last year and that is all i bought equipment wise. Everything else i already had lying around and picked up free bread makers.
    I have worked out including postage and electricity it costs me about 16 to $17 per kilo roasted.

    Being able to blend and roast to what i like and still very much learning what i like.
    Forever learning about how different beans behave during the roasting process, aging, grinding extraction ect ect.

  15. #15
    Junior Member micktleyden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sunbury, Melbourne
    Posts
    6

    Cost effectiveness of roasting

    Quote Originally Posted by dan77 View Post
    For me cost was what pushed me across the line.
    Same for me. I thought it would be interesting to try, but was hesitating at spending what I thought would be a truckload of money. Then I looked into it, and found roasters and beans were far cheeper than I expected so took the plunge on an iCoffee and have been hooked ever since. As others have said, does not matter which way you look at it you come out in front and it is great fun!

  16. #16
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,889
    As far as I'm concerned roasting in my coretto is extremely cost effective, set it up about 4 years ago for bugger all, it hasn't missed a beat since, I roast about 700 grams a week, you do the sums.

    Add to this the bonus of always having fresh beans on hand roasted the way I like them, it's a no brainer.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Daylesford
    Posts
    51

    Cost effectiveness of roasting

    It's half the price but you will double your consumption. I now think about tomorrow's coffee before I go to bed...... It's ridiculous.

    Hmmm, think I might go and roast some Png peaberry!

  18. #18
    Member danzx6r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    73
    The fun police likes the coffee I've produced from my starter pack as does one of her co-workers who wants to buy some from me.

    I figure I got 26 batches (2kgs) out of my $11 Target popper which didn't last as long as I'd have liked but was still pretty good value at a grand total of $50 for 2kg's of roasted coffee.

    So I'm not getting any grief at all at this point when it came to building my corretto.

    I told her I spent $100 on a heat gun and she didn't even bat an eye lid which is lucky for her cause I only spent $12 getting the bread maker. So I figure I'll stick with that for a while and she'll buy me the behmor for my bday or xmas... If not I'll start buying a big value pack of shit roast from Woolie's and grind her up a heap of that and feed that too her every morning for a while, should be nice esp after it goes stale as buggery. I love my wife... hehehe

    Dan

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    83
    Cost effectiveness of Roasting Coffee: Well this is my take.....

    i use a Corretto (already had the bread maker), purchased Makita heat Gun from bunning ($180.00),home-made bean cooler $22.00.

    Green beans from Andy, average $15.00 per kilo, my average usage 0.5kg per fortnight. I now on-sell to 4 people from work at 0.5kg each per fortnight. They pay $20 each per 500 gram bag per fortnight....Total revenue $80.00 per fortnight.

    Ultimate cost of my coffee addiction = $0.00........

    Doesn't get much better than that

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    369
    If you value your time at $5000.00 an hour never.

    If you are an average pay worker or lower ... maybe.

    Would I sound like an economist if I suggested some things are hard to put a price on?

    After all what is the payback period and return on investment on the wife/husband and kids/pets?

  21. #21
    Member danzx6r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    73
    My time... An hour in the carport/garage, beer or coffee in hand and left I peace. I'm sorry but that is worth it right there. The wife wants the coffee and to not spend money so she gets to watch the kids and I get a break. Love it.

    Now to offload some freebies to family and friends so I can keep roasting and tinkering with modding my Corretto.

    Dan

    Need to convert the bike to coffee power...
    stephen28 likes this.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Maddingley
    Posts
    222
    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by don_nairn View Post
    If you value your time at $5000.00 an hour never.

    If you are an average pay worker or lower ... maybe.

    Would I sound like an economist if I suggested some things are hard to put a price on?

    After all what is the payback period and return on investment on the wife/husband and kids/pets?
    No matter how much your worth you still need a hobby/outlet. If your putting a price on your down time then you are not relaxing.



Similar Threads

  1. AVERAGE COST OF COFFEE
    By ebaldw02 in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 18th May 2010, 09:40 AM
  2. The real cost of being a CS
    By Crisp_image in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 5th November 2009, 05:30 PM
  3. How much does it cost to roast each time?
    By pulokidy in forum Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 26th February 2009, 07:39 PM
  4. Zero cost mod for Miss Silvia
    By KJM in forum Brewing Equipment - Midrange ($500-$1500)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 9th December 2008, 04:13 PM
  5. A guess at the cost of a new Giotto
    By Cammo in forum Brewing Equipment - Pointy End ($1500-$3000)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11th August 2007, 02:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •