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Thread: roasting too quickly?

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    roasting too quickly?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Just a quick question. I have a popcorn machine that I use to roast. The 2nd crack comes at around the 8th minute. Is this too quick? Also what is so bad about roasting quickly?

    Cheers

    Paul

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    8 minutes is acceptable for a popper but your taste buds will be the judge. What's the batch size?

    The problem with roasting too quickly is that the bean may not be completely roasted if the heat hasn't had a chance to penetrate, especially with harder denser beans. This isn't necessarily a bad thing; some flavours can be lost with a longer, slower roast. Again, your taste buds will be the judge.

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    I generally put in 100g for each batch.

    I see... well when it comes out it tastes good but I don't know if its just my tastebuds but the beans that I've been roasting tastes really similar... El Salvador, Brazil pulped, PNG. There are very slight differences in the woody tastes as well as the acidity. Should I be tasting other things? Maybe as you said some of the flavours are being lost by the heat not penetrating it enough...

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Maybe as you said some of the flavours are being lost by the heat not penetrating it enough...
    No, I said flavours can be lost with long, slower roasts, not so much with quick roasts. Quick roasts may mean that some flavours won't develop.

    It's about your taste buds. If they say the coffee is good, then the coffee is good.

    If you feel you want to get better results, then you will need a roast method that allows more control.
    Many will progress to the heatgun using either a stainless bowl + whisk or a bread maker to agitate the beans. Heat level can be adjusted by changing the distance between the heatgun nozzle and the bean mass, or by using a variable temp heatgun.
    Plenty of reading about correttos and other roasting methods in the "Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas" board. Get cracking
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    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlqkdnf89 View Post
    Just a quick question. I have a popcorn machine that I use to roast. The 2nd crack comes at around the 8th minute. Is this too quick? Also what is so bad about roasting quickly?

    Cheers

    Paul
    Hi Paul
    FWIW I've used a corretto for a few years now, but picked up a popper for fun. I found that the few 4-7 min roasts I did were a bit harsh and didn't have a lot of complexity. I did manage to get some 15-20 min roasts on a cold day with a sieve on top which were beautiful - quite different to a corretto roast still, but had much more flavour than the quick roasts. But 20mins hand stirring for 50g worth of beans (two double baskets really!) was a bit silly! But you might like to try it for the sake of the experiemtn - it's free if you have a mesh sieve - then you can compare the flavours from your current roasts and let us know what you think :-)

    Matt

    fmd-popper.jpg

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    Coffee Nut fg1972's Avatar
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    A couple of things you could try to slow things down.
    * Slightly bigger batch size, ie another 20 grams which should take longer to get to temperature.
    * Ambient temperature plays a part too, try roasting somewhere cooler and or play around with a cooling fan while roasting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlqkdnf89 View Post
    I generally put in 100g for each batch.

    I see... well when it comes out it tastes good but I don't know if its just my tastebuds but the beans that I've been roasting tastes really similar... El Salvador, Brazil pulped, PNG. There are very slight differences in the woody tastes as well as the acidity. Should I be tasting other things? Maybe as you said some of the flavours are being lost by the heat not penetrating it enough...
    Hi Paul,

    Weather or not you can taste any difference between the various beans depends on a few things. If you're drinking it with milk, you might not pick up much difference. The longer you roast, the less bean flavor you'll get and the more you'll get the generic "roast" flavors. Its very hard with 8 mins roasts to hit a nice spot where you've roasted out the sour notes but have kept enough of the bean's flavor. Also the longer you let it rest the less harsh it will taste. Another way of stretching things out is to tilt the popper a few degrees off vertical. (Note - a SMALLER batch size will result in longer roasts on a popper).

    Pete

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    hahah 50g for 20 mins hand stirring doesn't sound too fun... But maybe if I have some time to burn I can try it. Ill try post up some photos when I roast my next batch but generally I think the roasts are quite even...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete39 View Post
    Hi Paul,

    Weather or not you can taste any difference between the various beans depends on a few things. If you're drinking it with milk, you might not pick up much difference. The longer you roast, the less bean flavor you'll get and the more you'll get the generic "roast" flavors. Its very hard with 8 mins roasts to hit a nice spot where you've roasted out the sour notes but have kept enough of the bean's flavor. Also the longer you let it rest the less harsh it will taste. Another way of stretching things out is to tilt the popper a few degrees off vertical. (Note - a SMALLER batch size will result in longer roasts on a popper).

    Pete
    Thanks Pete,

    Yeah that's what I've been reading... so I guess in order to get the complex flavours you need to find that nice spot where you got rid of the sour notes and keeping the flavour... which is why most people move to coretto... Ill try what you say and try tilting it

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    Quote Originally Posted by dlqkdnf89 View Post
    Thanks Pete,

    Yeah that's what I've been reading... so I guess in order to get the complex flavours you need to find that nice spot where you got rid of the sour notes and keeping the flavour... which is why most people move to coretto... Ill try what you say and try tilting it
    Move to a coretto or modify your popper. I like the latter because I can experiment with the small roast sizes. Its all fun whichever way you choose!

    Pete
    dlqkdnf89 likes this.



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