Results 1 to 8 of 8
Like Tree8Likes
  • 5 Post By Barry O'Speedwagon
  • 2 Post By Yelta
  • 1 Post By Yelta

Thread: Organising and storing roast batches - tips and ideas

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    12

    Question Organising and storing roast batches - tips and ideas

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I've done a bunch of roasts in my Behmor and am loving the results, but it's been a bit of an adventure recording roasts (200g batches) and matching the taste in the cup with the technique used on the roast. I try and store the batches at least a 3-5 days before use, which means I've usually got 3-4 batches lined up waiting. I'm looking for some tips on getting it all organised.

    This is my current process...
    1. Roast beans using RoastBuddy app on phone noting profiles, timing, manual settings etc.
    2. Transfer roasted beans in ziplock bag.
    3. Write roast information from app onto little paper ticket and stick in bag with beans.
    4. Keep the little ticket on the side of the espresso machine for the beans in the grinder.


    As you can tell it's a bit convoluted and I might be overthinking it, but wondered what others do? Anyone got any suggestions or tips for matching the taste with the roast?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,613
    I don't use a Roastbuddy or similar. I have a notebook (i.e. paper thing) in which I record the roast date, the weight and proportions of green beans, a rough description of temperature (if abnormal for season), and the initial Behmor profile. Then:
    1) record time that I manually switch from the auto profile (e.g. I might switch to 75% power 60% of the way through the max roast time)
    2) record time of first crack (when two cracks occur within quick succession), and record predicted time of end of roast (3:10 after FC for 400g roast)
    3) record time of rolling first crack
    4) record time of any subsequent manual drop in power (I tend to drop to 50% or 25% after rolling FC is definitely established)
    5) record time that roast is actually stopped, with comments as to whether second crack had started, and if so how far this had gone.

    This sounds like a lot, but it's really just few numbers and notes scrawled in a consistent fashion in a notepad. I used to employ a computerised approach...but there's much less stuffing around sitting on the back porch with a pen, a pad of paper and a roaster. The higher tech approach is fun.....and it teaches you a few things initially....but you can do equally well on a Behmor with a bit of common sense (e.g.don't change six variables at a time)

    I use a fine tip permanent marker to write enough detail on the one-way valve ziplock bag to cross-reference to my notebook.
    Dimal, matth3wh, Yelta and 2 others like this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Warragul, Vic
    Posts
    469
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    I don't use a Roastbuddy or similar. I have a notebook (i.e. paper thing) in which I record the roast date, the weight and proportions of green beans, a rough description of temperature (if abnormal for season), and the initial Behmor profile. Then:
    1) record time that I manually switch from the auto profile (e.g. I might switch to 75% power 60% of the way through the max roast time)
    2) record time of first crack (when two cracks occur within quick succession), and record predicted time of end of roast (3:10 after FC for 400g roast)
    3) record time of rolling first crack
    4) record time of any subsequent manual drop in power (I tend to drop to 50% or 25% after rolling FC is definitely established)
    5) record time that roast is actually stopped, with comments as to whether second crack had started, and if so how far this had gone.

    This sounds like a lot, but it's really just few numbers and notes scrawled in a consistent fashion in a notepad. I used to employ a computerised approach...but there's much less stuffing around sitting on the back porch with a pen, a pad of paper and a roaster. The higher tech approach is fun.....and it teaches you a few things initially....but you can do equally well on a Behmor with a bit of common sense (e.g.don't change six variables at a time)

    I use a fine tip permanent marker to write enough detail on the one-way valve ziplock bag to cross-reference to my notebook.

    +1 on writing it down. I also use printer labels that I stick on the bag.

    I started with a spreadsheet but found entering it on paper much easier. So I just print a blank spreadsheet first. It also makes me concentrate more while roasting so I don't miss auto shut off even though I know when that's going to happen. I take this a little further as I also enter number of days rested before using it, taste, grinder setting for single, double and double ristretto, timings and brew ratio. This might seem a little over the top but it comes in handy when returning to a previously used blend and when swapping drinks when friends turn up. I only do all of this when trying a new blend or SO

    When I return to a previous blend, I basically only write key information on the bag but record the roast date so I know the number of roasts I've done before the behmor's next cleaning cycle.
    Last edited by barri; 7th June 2017 at 08:50 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,866
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    I have a notebook (i.e. paper thing) in which I record the roast date, the weight and proportions of green beans, a rough description of temperature (if abnormal for season), and the initial Behmor profile.
    A lot to be said for the much maligned note book, of course to use one you do need to have mastered a few basic skills, such as writing, along with the ability to keep meaningful, accurate and concise notes, skills which seem to be rapidly disappearing.

    If you feel the need to go high tech use an indexed note book, endless possibilities.

    chrismelb and nickR like this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    301
    I also choose to resist the computer / logging / graphing approach.
    Its there if I want it but manual notes work fine.
    I also weigh my roasts out of the Behmor as a way of checking moisture content loss.
    Just another variable in the roasting adventure.

    Quote -
    2. "Transfer roasted beans in ziplock bag."


    Just confirming whether 'Ziplock' bags are plastic s/wich bags?
    Or
    Foil Lined Bags which are better for storing fresh beans and protecting against moisture, light, air etc.

    Also try resting yours fresh roasted beans (to de-gas) in a open protected container before bagging.
    This I've found can alleviate the need for one-way valve bags.
    Good Luck & Good Rosting
    EA
    Last edited by EspressoAdventurer; 7th June 2017 at 02:37 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,866
    Quote Originally Posted by EspressoAdventurer View Post
    I also choose to resist the computer
    I don't choose to resist the puter, more a case of using what I feel is the best/easiest/least complex tool for the job.

    Bags are one way valve, purpose designed for roasted coffee, I bag whilst beans are still very warm, have yet to find a better storage method.
    Dimal likes this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    201
    I use a spreadsheet containing only the data I want to store, included is a link to the roast profile jpg containing fan and gas settings. I also go back in and record tasting notes. I actually find it really good to be able to filter results by origin and compare roast notes - especially when u get a new bag of greens

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    12
    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by EspressoAdventurer View Post
    Quote -
    2. "Transfer roasted beans in ziplock bag."
    Just confirming whether 'Ziplock' bags are plastic s/wich bags?
    Or
    Foil Lined Bags which are better for storing fresh beans and protecting against moisture, light, air etc.

    Also try resting yours fresh roasted beans (to de-gas) in a open protected container before bagging.
    This I've found can alleviate the need for one-way valve bags.
    Good Luck & Good Rosting
    EA
    Yeah, I was using supermarket ziplock bags. I'd ordered some Mylar valve foil bags on an 'auction site' that took far too long to arrive. Since posting I've ordered and received some CS foil bags. Turns out they're quite nice to write on with whiteboard marker. So I am now just numbering the roast in RoastBuddy and then writing the beans, roast date and roast number on the bag. Wipes right off afterwards. Seems to be working well.

    What do do you mean by
    resting yours fresh roasted beans (to de-gas) in a open protected container
    ??



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •