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Thread: Headache from Tanzania Tanganyika AA

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    Headache from Tanzania Tanganyika AA

    I roasted some Tanzania beans from CS but every time after drinking it I got headache and feeling a lot of gas in my stomach. My wife got the same problem. While I do not have any problem with Ethiopian Yirgacheffe. Did any have similar experience or knows the reason?

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcwangliang View Post
    I roasted some Tanzania beans from CS but every time after drinking it I got headache and feeling a lot of gas in my stomach. My wife got the same problem. While I do not have any problem with Ethiopian Yirgacheffe. Did any have similar experience or knows the reason?
    What a strange first post.

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    I agree with Yelta strange first post but it might be the higher acidity that your body doesn't like.

    You could prove that by trying the PNG Wahgi or the Kenya AA that are in BeanBay but maybe just avoid those too and try something like the Indian Elephant Hills, Peru or even Sulawesi Blue as low acidity coffees.

    You could also try roasting the Tanzanian a little darker, lighter the roast, the higher the acidity.
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    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    That's unlikely unless eating an apple also gives you the same symptoms.

    Coffee is a low acid beverage compared to fruits and preparations therefrom (cider, wine). A typical coffee at 20% extraction into twice its weight in water (eg a very strong espresso at about 10 Brix) would have about 1 g/l organic acids, compared to 6 - 8 g/l in wine (much higher in some wines eg Champagne). The buffering capacity of coffee is evidently also much higher as the pH is typically above 4.6, so there is 10 - 20 times as much active acid in wine (pH typically 3.3 to 3.6)

    Most of the stuff you read online about acids in coffee fails to differentiate between polyphenols such as chlorogenic acid and low molecular weight organic acids such as citric etc. The former will result in astringency, the latter will result in perceived acidity (sourness).
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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcwangliang View Post
    I roasted some Tanzania beans from CS but every time after drinking it I got headache and feeling a lot of gas in my stomach. My wife got the same problem. While I do not have any problem with Ethiopian Yirgacheffe. Did any have similar experience or knows the reason?
    How are you preparing your drink? Espresso? Filter? Milk-based?

    Are you drinking the coffee at the same time of day as usual (e.g. after breakfast / before)?

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    Thank you All for the prompt response. It may just be me. Interestingly couple of days ago after a coffee in a shop, I got the same symptom. Any way, I will try different beans to see. Roasting and making coffee are really enjoyably and will keep going ...

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    That's unlikely unless eating an apple also gives you the same symptoms.

    Coffee is a low acid beverage compared to fruits and preparations therefrom (cider, wine). A typical coffee at 20% extraction into twice its weight in water (eg a very strong espresso at about 10 Brix) would have about 1 g/l organic acids, compared to 6 - 8 g/l in wine (much higher in some wines eg Champagne). The buffering capacity of coffee is evidently also much higher as the pH is typically above 4.6, so there is 10 - 20 times as much active acid in wine (pH typically 3.3 to 3.6)

    Most of the stuff you read online about acids in coffee fails to differentiate between polyphenols such as chlorogenic acid and low molecular weight organic acids such as citric etc. The former will result in astringency, the latter will result in perceived acidity (sourness).

    Yeh, but it's not just the acid in the food product that you take in. Drinking coffee on an empty stomach increases acid production in your stomach (certainly does for me), and it seems to do so more significantly than if eating solid (acidic) food (or maybe that's just a function of the extent to which acids rise to the oesophagus.

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    I get the same problem from too much beer.

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    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Yeh, but it's not just the acid in the food product that you take in. Drinking coffee on an empty stomach increases acid production in your stomach ...
    The gastric response is caffeine driven.

    The post to which I was replying talked about higher and lower acid coffee varieties, no mention was made of caffeine levels.

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    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    That's unlikely unless eating an apple also gives you the same symptoms.

    Coffee is a low acid beverage compared to fruits and preparations therefrom (cider, wine). A typical coffee at 20% extraction into twice its weight in water (eg a very strong espresso at about 10 Brix) would have about 1 g/l organic acids, compared to 6 - 8 g/l in wine (much higher in some wines eg Champagne). The buffering capacity of coffee is evidently also much higher as the pH is typically above 4.6, so there is 10 - 20 times as much active acid in wine (pH typically 3.3 to 3.6)

    Most of the stuff you read online about acids in coffee fails to differentiate between polyphenols such as chlorogenic acid and low molecular weight organic acids such as citric etc. The former will result in astringency, the latter will result in perceived acidity (sourness).
    Ah that is interesting! Having had really bad reflux recently I went off coffee a bit just to give my insides a break, but found no difference when off it compared to when drinking it.

    And I just had my first apple before and I got nothing, no effect XD so mine must not be dietary related as I suspected...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    How are you preparing your drink? Espresso? Filter? Milk-based?

    Are you drinking the coffee at the same time of day as usual (e.g. after breakfast / before)?
    Milk-based. Yes, I drink the coffee right after breakfast around the same time every day.

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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Gc Wang - what are the specifics of the Roast (s) for both the Tanzanian & Ethiopian beans you refer to?
    What stage have you roasted both these beans too?
    1 only roast each? Or multiple roasts to date?

    And how did you as the barista prepare the beverages?
    Dose? Yield? Qty of milk added?

    If you wish to understand more about how you both may have reacted to the Freshness of the Beans
    consistently supplied via CS..... there is plenty to digest from the link below.
    https://www.coffeechemistry.com/about-us

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