Results 1 to 10 of 10
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By LeroyC
  • 2 Post By simonsk8r

Thread: Behmor 1600 drum speed

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    14

    Behmor 1600 drum speed

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Been going through heaps of posts about roasting using the behmor 1600+.

    ive noticed that there are different approaches with regard to drum speed when roasting in manual mode. The faster drum speed is said to make the taste brighter, while lower drum speed has been said to make things a bit flat.

    some go fast at the start of their roast till fc then, slow the drum till end of roast, typically with a lowering of power to extend the time till end, wherever that ends up.

    Others do the opposite, normal drum speed to fc, then fast drum speed with lowering of power till end of roast.

    what is the consensus regarding approaches and why.

  2. #2
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,246
    Youíll probably find that the differences youíre seeing in posts online can probably be fairly equally divided between North American users that have a 110v machine and those in Australasia and Europe that are lucky enough to have the far superior 220v version. Generally the higher drum speed can do two things - increase conduction and mimic higher air flow. So I guess what you do with that is up to you. Personally I think itís unnecessary at the start of a roast unless youíre on a 110v machine or trying something a bit funky with youíre batch size.
    It depends on the coffee Iím roasting but I usually go to double drum speed when Iím getting close to or around first crack to give me more Ďair flowí and a more robust crack. Again it depends on the coffee - sometimes I go back to normal drum speed during first crack, other times itís at high speed right to the end of the roast. Does that make sense?

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    It depends on the coffee I’m roasting but I usually go to double drum speed when I’m getting close to or around first crack to give me more ‘air flow’ and a more robust crack. Again it depends on the coffee - sometimes I go back to normal drum speed during first crack, other times it’s at high speed right to the end of the roast. Does that make sense?
    i guess your saying a strong fc is desirable and you’ll use the drum speed to get that to happen, before slowing things down.

  4. #4
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,246
    Quote Originally Posted by piccoloman View Post
    i guess your saying a strong fc is desirable and youíll use the drum speed to get that to happen, before slowing things down.
    Yes and no. Itís purpose depends very much on the coffee. The two main reasons are this:
    1. With an Ethiopian for example, or maybe a PNG or something I might have been going fairly easy through the start of the roast and if I donít add some momentum before first crack I wonít get a good rolling first crack. Obviously you donít want first crack to be really short, but if itís too long and kind of limps along thatís worse as clearly thereís beans developing at vastly different rates. So in this case thatís what Iím trying to achieve. With most Ethiopians Iíd put the brakes on at the first hint of first crack and go back to standard drum speed once rolling first crack is under way or itíll get away on me, but a PNG would have a different approach.
    2. Thereís plenty of coffees that donít need extra assistance to give a nice strong first crack. With something like a Colombian for example Iím using the double drum speed to ensure an even roast, but also avoid a RoR Ďcrashí at first crack when I power down. To a certain extent Iím flying blind as I donít have a BT probe, but lots of experimenting has led me to this conclusion based on results in the cup.

  5. #5
    Member skeevs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    58
    What’s an ROR crash ? I have been doing the speed up drum speed at the start and slow down at FC.

  6. #6
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,246
    Quote Originally Posted by skeevs View Post
    Whatís an ROR crash ? I have been doing the speed up drum speed at the start and slow down at FC.
    Itís where the bean temp (BT) Rate-of-Rise (RoR) falls through the floor at first crack due to the power/gas/flame/heat being lowered too much. Obviously you want to wind things back at first crack no matter what roaster youíre using, but if you over do it the RoR can Ďcrashí and you can stall the roast or at least negatively influence the remainder of your roast as youíve lost too much energy.
    Using double drum speed at the start will work for some people and Iím not saying thereís anything wrong with it, itís just not what I do as Iíve had more success doing slightly smaller batches (about 250g) and dble drum speed at first crack. If youíve tried a few things and found a method that works for you then Iíd stick with it. Iím guessing youíre mostly doing larger batches (400-500g) and mostly roasting dense coffees like Central Americans. Would that be right?
    skeevs likes this.

  7. #7
    Member skeevs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    It’s where the bean temp (BT) Rate-of-Rise (RoR) falls through the floor at first crack due to the power/gas/flame/heat being lowered too much. Obviously you want to wind things back at first crack no matter what roaster you’re using, but if you over do it the RoR can ‘crash’ and you can stall the roast or at least negatively influence the remainder of your roast as you’ve lost too much energy.
    I did learn about making sure the temp doesn't fall below a certain point but have not seen what that threshold is. I've been coasting the temp so it doesn't go lower than -10C during FC.


    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Using double drum speed at the start will work for some people and I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with it, it’s just not what I do as I’ve had more success doing slightly smaller batches (about 250g) and dble drum speed at first crack. If you’ve tried a few things and found a method that works for you then I’d stick with it. I’m guessing you’re mostly doing larger batches (400-500g) and mostly roasting dense coffees like Central Americans. Would that be right?
    I've only got that from Joe Behm's video and other guide video from youtube, and I'm after the caramel/chocolatey flavours. Both videos however were roasting 400g, but I've only been doing 200g batches only. . I'll give your method a go and see how that works out. I actually did a small batch of India Elephant Hills yesterday, doubled drum speed at the start and forgot to slow it down during FC. We'll have to see how that turned out taste wise!

  8. #8
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    1,075
    I've only ever used double drum speed as soon as rolling first crack hits, never from the start of a roast. Only really because it was recommended, but it makes sense, and I assume it's to increase air flow and generally slow down the RoR so the roast doesn't "take off" and FC doesn't blend into SC.

    Most of the development should be pre-FC, but that doesn't mean that everything after FC doesn't matter huh. I'm still learning with the manual controls of the Behmor, having only installed and played with it for a few roasts, but am learning a bunch, and am really happy with how most the roasts have turned out so far!

    I'd stick with one method consistently and then slowly introduce other variables and see what happens as a result, taking lots of notes along the way. I couldn't really say what the benefits of double drum speed from the start would be.. I personally would probably more likely just start with a slower ramp up in heat instead.

    And cheers Leroy for all that juicy info, cool stuff!
    Last edited by simonsk8r; 26th November 2018 at 12:08 AM.
    CafeLotta and skeevs like this.

  9. #9
    Member skeevs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by simonsk8r View Post
    I've only ever used double drum speed as soon as rolling first crack hits, never from the start of a roast. Only really because it was recommended, but it makes sense, and I assume it's to increase air flow and generally slow down the RoR so the roast doesn't "take off" and FC doesn't blend into SC.
    I haven't quite been able to discern SC from FC and have been kinda guessing the past few roasts. Maybe it has been due to the doubled drum speed right at the start.

  10. #10
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    1,075
    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by skeevs View Post
    I haven't quite been able to discern SC from FC and have been kinda guessing the past few roasts. Maybe it has been due to the doubled drum speed right at the start.
    Yeah quite possibly. All I know is that for some/most beans I've roasted if the heat application doesn't lower coming into rolling FC it can go straight into SC, when it's much better to have a gap of sorts between the two phases.

    This is why many people back "in the day" (including myself) cracked the door open a tad when FC hit so it doesn't roll right through. This was with the old model Behmor, with the Plus model we have the option of manually changing the heat. Maybe even don't worry about double drum speed and just focus on lowering the heat at FC or rolling FC? Otherwise do that in conjunction with double drum speed, but experimenting is the fun part



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •