Results 1 to 18 of 18
Like Tree13Likes
  • 3 Post By saeco_user
  • 4 Post By Yelta
  • 1 Post By nickR
  • 1 Post By Dimal
  • 3 Post By Dimal
  • 1 Post By jasmineeeee

Thread: Popper or Corretto

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25

    Popper or Corretto

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I am planning on roasting for both pour over and espresso, and I find they tend to be quite uneven if I pull the coffee out before second crack (popper)
    Will you guys reckon corretto is much better for roasting coffee in comparison to popcorn popper?
    Will any bread maker works as long as it rotates when the lid opened?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    246
    Corretto every day of the week.
    Much more control over the roast (more than a Behmor??)
    Able to roast a much more useful (for me) quantity of beans.
    Able to start very simply (breadmaker + heatgun) and upgrade as you go (better heat gun, insulated basket, heatsnob).
    It either needs a "knead only" cycle or you'll need to disconnect the heating element.
    Yes, the kneading arm needs to rotate with the lid open (by default or through modification).
    greenman, DaveD and jasmineeeee like this.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by saeco_user View Post
    Corretto every day of the week.
    Much more control over the roast (more than a Behmor??)
    Able to roast a much more useful (for me) quantity of beans.
    Able to start very simply (breadmaker + heatgun) and upgrade as you go (better heat gun, insulated basket, heatsnob).
    It either needs a "knead only" cycle or you'll need to disconnect the heating element.
    Yes, the kneading arm needs to rotate with the lid open (by default or through modification).
    I am not sure if the 'Dough' function is a knead only cycle of will it be heating up during the process...

  4. #4
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,866
    Hi Jasmine, Ive been roasting (successfully) weekly using a Coretto set up for many years now.

    Have never used a popper, however believe they are more of a sample roaster (small quantities) I roast batches of 750 grams in the Coretto and achieve very even, reliable results.

    When setting it up I disconnected the heating element and wired it so that the paddle rotates continuously (timer disabled) when it is switched on, an electrician should be able to convert the bread maker without a lot of effort.

    You would also need a decent variable speed heat gun, I use a Bosch, it does a good job, as well as a way to monitor temperature throughout the process, as well as a bean cooler.

    It sounds a lot more complex than it really is, if you decide to go for a Coretto I'm sure there are plenty of people on the forum (myself included) prepared to offer help/advice.

    Good luck whichever method you decide on.

    This was my first roasting set up, about 10 years ago (my flower pot roaster) still using the same heat gun.
    DSC_7631.jpg
    Dimal, greenman, DaveD and 1 others like this.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Hi Jasmine, Ive been roasting (successfully) weekly using a Coretto set up for many years now.

    Have never used a popper, however believe they are more of a sample roaster (small quantities) I roast batches of 750 grams in the Coretto and achieve very even, reliable results.

    When setting it up I disconnected the heating element and wired it so that the paddle rotates continuously (timer disabled) when it is switched on, an electrician should be able to convert the bread maker without a lot of effort.

    You would also need a decent variable speed heat gun, I use a Bosch, it does a good job, as well as a way to monitor temperature throughout the process, as well as a bean cooler.

    It sounds a lot more complex than it really is, if you decide to go for a Coretto I'm sure there are plenty of people on the forum (myself included) prepared to offer help/advice.

    Good luck whichever method you decide on.

    This was my first roasting set up, about 10 years ago (my flower pot roaster) still using the same heat gun.
    DSC_7631.jpg
    It seems like most people tend to roast 500g up when they use corretto, does it mean it is not suitable for smaller batches (i.e. 200g)?
    I've found some second hand bread makers, but they all warm up during the 'dough' process, could the coffee roasting works out even if I don't modify it?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,866
    Quote Originally Posted by jasmineeeee View Post
    It seems like most people tend to roast 500g up when they use corretto, does it mean it is not suitable for smaller batches (i.e. 200g)?
    I've found some second hand bread makers, but they all warm up during the 'dough' process, could the coffee roasting works out even if I don't modify it?
    The popper may well be your best choice for smaller batches.

    My thoughts re a bread maker would certainly be to modify it, at least to the point that the element is disconnected and the run timer is disabled.

  7. #7
    Coffee Fiend
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    103
    I am using an old sunbeam bake house breadmaker - the dough setting has a premix for about 18minutes, where it just spins, and then it would stop spinning and heat up for the rest of the dough making.

    so mine doesn’t heat up as it is spinning - but I have a 18min time limit for my coffee roasting.

    If if it hits the time limit the safety cutout will kick in, because the machine gets too hot.

    most machines have a similar dough cycle, so you shouldn’t have to modify to get started - just look at the manual and it should say what the dough setting will do.

    when you get comfy with it, then yes the first mods will be to disconnect elements and just get it to spin forever.

    enjoy - once you start you’ll never go back !!!
    jasmineeeee likes this.

  8. #8
    Coffee Fiend
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    103
    PS, I also started with a popper and you can only really do 100g or less - otherwise they will burn on the bottom. Terribly uneven.

    I am roasting 250 - 350g per roast in the bread maker.

  9. #9
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    16,766
    Quote Originally Posted by jasmineeeee View Post
    It seems like most people tend to roast 500g up when they use corretto, does it mean it is not suitable for smaller batches (i.e. 200g)?
    G'day Jasmineeeee...

    It really depends on the particular BM design.
    A BM that bakes a small-ish to medium sized loaf say, up to 750g or so and uses a vertical baking pan could be used to roast batches down to about 250-300g without too much trouble.

    Using a good quality Heatgun like the one Yelta and many other CSers use, you can then get away with using a lower air speed and precision temperature control to roast really nice small-ish batches. I'm not au fait with the various brands/models these days but a search around the various manufacturers should give you some ideas...

    Mal.
    jasmineeeee likes this.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    G'day Jasmineeeee...

    It really depends on the particular BM design.
    A BM that bakes a small-ish to medium sized loaf say, up to 750g or so and uses a vertical baking pan could be used to roast batches down to about 250-300g without too much trouble.

    Using a good quality Heatgun like the one Yelta and many other CSers use, you can then get away with using a lower air speed and precision temperature control to roast really nice small-ish batches. I'm not au fait with the various brands/models these days but a search around the various manufacturers should give you some ideas...

    Mal.
    Just bought a second hand BM (vertical) without knowing if it needs any modifications....
    now straggle to chose a heat gun, not sure if Ozito heat gun suitable for roasting (2nd hand again)

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    The popper may well be your best choice for smaller batches.

    My thoughts re a bread maker would certainly be to modify it, at least to the point that the element is disconnected and the run timer is disabled.
    Popper was pretty uneven if I stop the roast before SC.
    Just bought the BM, hopefully it won't need any modification...

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by nickR View Post
    I am using an old sunbeam bake house breadmaker - the dough setting has a premix for about 18minutes, where it just spins, and then it would stop spinning and heat up for the rest of the dough making.

    so mine doesn’t heat up as it is spinning - but I have a 18min time limit for my coffee roasting.

    If if it hits the time limit the safety cutout will kick in, because the machine gets too hot.

    most machines have a similar dough cycle, so you shouldn’t have to modify to get started - just look at the manual and it should say what the dough setting will do.

    when you get comfy with it, then yes the first mods will be to disconnect elements and just get it to spin forever.

    enjoy - once you start you’ll never go back !!!
    Which heat gun you are using?
    I thought the BM will heat/warm up the dough when spinning, not sure how it actually works tho, as I never own one.

    The popper was quite nice if I want to roast for espresso

  13. #13
    Coffee Fiend
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by jasmineeeee View Post
    Which heat gun you are using?
    Ozito I believe - standard bunnings stuff.

    You will need to experiment with your setup to see what works - eg, bread maker lid up / down / off entirely? Where to place heat gun / and so on.
    Have fun!

  14. #14
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    16,766
    I reckon you shouldn't skimp on the quality of heatgun to use; it's even more important than the method/device you use for agitation.

    Picture that you are halfway through a roast batch and the HG spits the dummy. If you happen to have a known good spare sitting next to you at the time, you may be able to save the batch as a drinkable coffee. Not the best approach by a long way.

    Far better to get a quality HG right from the start, hence the recommendation to go with a Bosch unit like Yelta has. These rarely fail and most owners have been using them for many years without the slightest problem. In addition, they are extremely easy to use and very flexible in operation.

    Definitely worth considering...

    Mal.
    Yelta, 338 and jasmineeeee like this.

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    I reckon you shouldn't skimp on the quality of heatgun to use; it's even more important than the method/device you use for agitation.

    Picture that you are halfway through a roast batch and the HG spits the dummy. If you happen to have a known good spare sitting next to you at the time, you may be able to save the batch as a drinkable coffee. Not the best approach by a long way.

    Far better to get a quality HG right from the start, hence the recommendation to go with a Bosch unit like Yelta has. These rarely fail and most owners have been using them for many years without the slightest problem. In addition, they are extremely easy to use and very flexible in operation.

    Definitely worth considering...

    Mal.
    I bought a cheap HG before you replied, since I failed to bid for the used Ozito, and not planning to use the Correetto for longer than a year (pre-ordered the Kelvin "popper" roaster as I will be moving to an apartment without balcony, which does not seems to be a good place to use a corretto)
    Just received the BM this morning, the Dough function includes kneading process that last for 30min (3 min slow mode, then 27 min fast mode), and then 1 hr rise
    However, I couldn't reset it once it started to knead, unless I unplug it, but it continues the previous process once it is plugged, anyone experienced the same? Not sure what to do about that 1hr rise.....
    Dimal likes this.

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    3
    I've just bought a BM recently and slightly modified the wiring to allow control of the heating element. I can pre heat the tin and provide the heat for the roast with the heating element while operating in the dough setting. So far I have only done 3 roasts but all were successful and tasted great.

    I haven't touched anything else yet but may in the future do the same with the dough mixing motor. Might add a dimmer to the heat element circuit to allow variable control of the heat and a temp display if I am feeling enthusiastic.

    Thanks

  17. #17
    Member skeevs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    58
    @jamo96 does that mean there is no need for you to use a heatgun since you're using the heating element from the BM instead ?

  18. #18
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,866
    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by skeevs View Post
    @jamo96 does that mean there is no need for you to use a heatgun since you're using the heating element from the BM instead ?
    The heat gun is your primary heat source, most Coretto users disconnect the heating element.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •