View Poll Results: How long do you rest freshly roasted beans before moving to a container?

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  • I move the beans to the container container immediately after roasting

    6 22.22%
  • I wait until the beans reach room temperature

    17 62.96%
  • I wait a several hours

    0 0%
  • I wait until the next day

    2 7.41%
  • Other (please specify)

    2 7.41%
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  • 2 Post By Yelta
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Thread: How long do you rest freshly roasted beans before moving to a container?

  1. #1
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    How long do you rest freshly roasted beans before moving to a container?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I'm using Gene Cafe roaster since 2009 but have been quite inconsistent with how I handle resting and storage. I'm posting this thread to find our what others are doing. I'll probably create other similar polls about other aspects.

  2. #2
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    I put mine in open one way valve bags until room temp or at least until the bag doesnít feel warm and then close the bag up. That works for me.

    If Iím in a hurry I prefer to shut the bags with warm beans rather than let the beans sit for hours.

  3. #3
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Our bean cooler cools the beans down to ambient temperature within a minute and within another 4-5 minutes the beans are happily sealed inside foil lined, 1-way valve bags...
    They remain there for at least a week and up to two weeks before cracking the bags open again.

    Mal.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    They remain there for at least a week and up to two weeks before cracking the bags open again.
    I assume you're not using an air roaster? Because for air roasting I think this may be too slow. 3 days after roasting the coffee I roast with the Gene Cafe is not optimal, but it's certainly much better than 14 days after. I believe that with roasters that don't blow hot air the coffee ages more slowly, which would better fit your usage schedule.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boren View Post
    I assume you're not using an air roaster? Because for air roasting I think this may be too slow. 3 days after roasting the coffee I roast with the Gene Cafe is not optimal, but it's certainly much better than 14 days after. I believe that with roasters that don't blow hot air the coffee ages more slowly, which would better fit your usage schedule.
    It depends on the beans. Those from Yemen, for instance, and most robusta need a couple of weeks to hit their peak.

  6. #6
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    How long do you rest freshly roasted beans before moving to a container?

    Quote Originally Posted by boren View Post
    I assume you're not using an air roaster? Because for air roasting I think this may be too slow. 3 days after roasting the coffee I roast with the Gene Cafe is not optimal, but it's certainly much better than 14 days after. I believe that with roasters that don't blow hot air the coffee ages more slowly, which would better fit your usage schedule.
    Thatís somewhat true, but not enough to be particularly useful. The only time itís really true is if youíre comparing exactly the same coffee roasted in comparable ways to the same end point on similar size, but different roasters. An SR500 v a Gene Cafe for example.
    Thereís no hard and fast rules about resting times, you just need to try to find what works for you with each coffee. The one thing I recommend is that you cool relatively fast after roasting, certainly within 10min and you then put into air tight storage thatís either opaque or able to be kept in the dark straight away. The old method of keeping coffee in open containers for 24hrs is a bad idea.
    Personally I usually wait at least three days for espresso roasts and 6-10 for lighter filter roasts. Iíll use coffee earlier if I need to, but never within 24hrs. Thereís a couple of tricks you can use if youíre espresso coffee is a bit fresh such as pre-grinding, but I wonít go into that here.
    Last edited by LeroyC; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:17 PM.
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  7. #7
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boren View Post
    I assume you're not using an air roaster? Because for air roasting I think this may be too slow. 3 days after roasting the coffee I roast with the Gene Cafe is not optimal, but it's certainly much better than 14 days after. I believe that with roasters that don't blow hot air the coffee ages more slowly, which would better fit your usage schedule.
    What Leroy said... ^^^^

    Mal.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Thatís somewhat true, but not enough to be particularly useful. The only time itís really true is if youíre comparing exactly the same coffee roasted in comparable ways to the same end point on similar size, but different roasters. An SR500 v a Gene Cafe for example.
    I do notice once the beans reach about two weeks from roasting they don't produce what I would call good coffee, regardless of their origin. It might only be applicable to the Gene Cafe or to my personal preferences.

    Thereís no hard and fast rules about resting times, you just need to try to find what works for you with each coffee. The one thing I recommend is that you cool relatively fast after roasting, certainly within 10min and you then put into air tight storage thatís either opaque or able to be kept in the dark straight away. The old method of keeping coffee in open containers for 24hrs is a bad idea.
    The results of the poll seem to bear the same conclusion. I'll make sure to move the beans to the container as soon as they reach room temperature.

    I'm afraid there's not much I can do to accelerate cooling the beans beyond just raising the roaster hood and (maybe) directing a fan toward the roasting drum. I did this in the past but I'm not sure it benefited aging much so I stopped bothering. Maybe I should try it again and time how long it actually takes to cool the beans with and without the external fan.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I leave mine in the cooler until I'm able to comfortably able to touch them with no risk of burning my fingers, then place in one way valve bags immediately for at least a week.

    I will often, try them immediately after roasting, then a few days later to experience the change/improvement.
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  10. #10
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    @Yelta - Can you share what kind of roaster you're using? Do you find consistent improvements between, say, day 4 and day 7 after roasting?

  11. #11
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boren View Post
    @Yelta - Can you share what kind of roaster you're using? Do you find consistent improvements between, say, day 4 and day 7 after roasting?
    Evening Boren, I roast weekly with a Coretto setup, 750 grams green per batch.

    Improvement time varies enormously, all are a bit harsh immediately post roast, most are pretty good after a few days rest, its an incremental thing, kind of sneaks up on you, some continue to improve out to a month, it's really down to experience and personal preference.
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  12. #12
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    Once they're room temperature I move them to an unzipped Ziploc bag to de-gas on the counter for 24 hours, then into the airtight, opaque container from there. But by all means, let me know if I'm doing this wrong!

  13. #13
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeanPoet View Post
    Once they're room temperature I move them to an unzipped Ziploc bag to de-gas on the counter for 24 hours, then into the airtight, opaque container from there. But by all means, let me know if I'm doing this wrong!
    I would avoid leaving them in the open like that. It really doesnít achieve anything except for accelerating their degradation a week down the track.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeanPoet View Post
    Once they're room temperature I move them to an unzipped Ziploc bag to de-gas on the counter for 24 hours, then into the airtight, opaque container from there. But by all means, let me know if I'm doing this wrong!
    I suggest you put them into one way valve bags and expel as much air as possible, then seal the bag while they are still warm.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member GrahamK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    I suggest you put them into one way valve bags and expel as much air as possible, then seal the bag while they are still warm.
    I agree with this method, there is also a theory that allowing de-gassing within the one way valve bags drives out residual oxygen, thereby prolonging their shelf life?

    If you need to run them though a de-stoner first, then this is more difficult, but still bag them ASAP.

    GrahamK
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  16. #16
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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by boren View Post
    I'm afraid there's not much I can do to accelerate cooling the beans beyond just raising the roaster hood and (maybe) directing a fan toward the roasting drum.
    I have a Gene Cafe also, and you can work around the preset cooling program. Normally, when you press the red button, it'll go into cooling mode which will turn off the element until it reaches 60 deg C, if you press the red button again, it'll run until 100 deg C.

    The work around, and the method I use, is:
    - when your roast has reached your preference, hold the red button down for "Emergency Stop": the chamber will rotate into the start/exit position.
    - remove beans and place into a sieve/colander and place over a fan [or have a search for other members cooling set ups]
    - put chamber back into Gene
    - start a dummy roasting program, and immediately press the red button to go into cooling mode, to cool down the chamber and roaster to 60 deg C.

    i hope that makes sense.



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