Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: How oily is too oily? and lesson learned

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    838

    How oily is too oily? and lesson learned

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Not content with the knowledge that you can only sucessfully roast about 1/2cup of green beans in a popper (what I learned from watching a YouTube vid ::)),. I just had to challenge that recommended amount didnt I?..(like as if folk hadnt already tried larger amounts and there wasnt good reason for the limit phrrrt) In my defence,.. I never read or heard why such a small amount was recommended,..erm though in hindsight...

    Anyway,. Im trying to establish a good roast-for-consumption balance because of an extreme fear of running out of roasted beans yet again :o,...I decided to do two larger roasts this morning (I didnt learn from the first roast, and had to make the mistake twice for it to sink in).

    I like to live dangerously *snort*,..and thought, if Im going to increase the amount per roast,..why waste time adding just a few extra beans,.. I might as well double it and tossed a full cup of CS Blend into the popper. :o
    Here are the reasons you should not roast a full cup of grean beans in the popper.
    1. The beans will not rotate on their own and the beans at the bottom will burn quickly
    2. The beans will expand to overflowing and push the chimney out.
    3. Hot beans will come to the top of the popper where there is plastic.
    4. Roasts will be very uneven.
    5. Because they are roasting so unevenly,..second crack begins for some beens while 1st crack is still happening for others which makes the whole roast and time to pull confusing.

    Even though I was somewhat stupid in doing this,. I was a little prepared. I had a long handled SS utensil that I used to stir the beans continually, however the first roast was still very uneven despite this,.with the variation in bean colour after roast ranging from one or two beans at CS3 right up to about 15 beans at CS12,..not good. I picked out the oily looking CS12 and some CS11 as well as the CS3-4 and tossed them. Overall,.. what I have left looks more even-ish but I think that I will see quite a bit of oil coming out of a good percentage of these beens in a few days time.

    Next roast was PNG peaberry. I cup again,.and a more concentrated effort in stirring resulted in a slightly more even roast, however I almost lost it as the roast darkened so quickly, and I needed to toss out about a tablespoon of dark oily beans before I was happy with the look of the roast. Even then I think it may be too dark overall. How oily is too oily?,.. if oil is present on some of the beans right after roast,.. are they still drinkable or already gone too far and should be tossed? What I have left in this roast is mostly CS8 to CS10,.with a sprinkle of CS11.

    So,..it took me until the second roast to see that although the overflowing thing and pushing out the chimney was annoying (originally thought I could mod something to fix that little problem),.. it also meant I could possible melt the top plastic section of the popper *sigh* so reason enough not to do this amount again. :(

    Oh well,.. some of us have to learn by doing,.. and at least I have almost two full cups of roasted beans, albeit probably end up a little more oily than I would like.


  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,530

    Re: How oily is too oily? and lesson learned

    You might want to get into the habit of weighing each batch. As bean densities vary greatly, volume just isnt a good way to measure beans for your roasts.

    Pick up a small kitchen scale, digital if you like, I use analogue out in the garage. That way you can at least maintain some sort of consistency between roasts (and that is really important).

    By the way, you might also want to make a "catcher" for chaff/renegade beans. A good example is my "popperdom." I would recommend using metal flyscreen, as you can cut it to the shape/size you require. You just make a sock-like shape, closed at one end, bent at 90 degrees to create a reservoir to hold chaff. Simply slip it over your chimney, and off you go.

    Some pictures are here: http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1126057714

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    838

    Re: How oily is too oily? and lesson learned

    Oh yeah,. I hadnt thought about it like that. I mean,.. I should have, since I noticed there is quite a difference in the size of bean between varieties...and within varieties themselves in fact. And here I was convincing myself that I dont need to buy scales, but looks like I will need to afterall. Hmmm.. Ive got analogue kitchen scales which I tried to use for beans once, but they arent the best for accuracy me thinks and my guess is that they deliver a 20g give or take result,.a guestimate at best.. Argh now I need a knock box and digital scales. Does it ever end?

    Cool,.. love the popperdom Nunu *larfs @ that thread*,.. great idea. Though using it would mean Id definitely have to limit the quantity so it wont need to be agitated by hand. But WhaaaaH!! :(.. I wanna go bigger not smaller and if it wasnt for the need to agitate such a size,. the popperdom would be great for premature ebeanulation as things expand which Ive found to be the problem, not echaffulation. Echaffulation is normal and to be expected I think,.. never premature,..but it certainly would be nice to keep the stuff contained and out of my hair. ::)






  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,530

    Re: How oily is too oily? and lesson learned

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    With the popperdom in place, you agitate for the first 30-45 seconds by shaking the popper. Thats how I used to do it. Now I dont even bother, and the result is still the same.

    I use two poppers alternately, no more than 140g in each, but usually 125 to finish around 100g after bean mass loss.



Similar Threads

  1. Oily coffee
    By dan77 in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 25th September 2012, 10:41 PM
  2. Also oily
    By codlocks in forum Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 7th November 2007, 01:09 PM
  3. my beans are oily
    By brianleon in forum Home Roasting - Tips, Tricks, Ideas
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 1st November 2007, 06:01 PM
  4. Ultra-oily espresso
    By gregpullman in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10th February 2007, 08:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •