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Thread: Roasting different origins together

  1. #1
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    Roasting different origins together

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    GDay All

    I recall on a thread somewhere that it was suggested that you could roast beans from similar origins together. *

    If pressed for time & I can only do one batch, would it be a disaster to roast different origins together? *E.g. I have some Ethiopian Yirg & Peru Grace Villa I want to roast togther? 8-)

    Thanks
    Andrew

  2. #2
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Hi Andrew, the Peru Grace and Yirg should make a nice blend, I quite often roast a south/central american with Kenya AA or Harar Blue Horse and get good results. Give it a go and see how it turns out..........

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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Beans of s similar density roast well together. Whilst some are dead against pre-blending, I have found it can work quite well.

    M.

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    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Its no secret that I pre-blend a lot of my roast batches but thats only after I have a full appreciation of all the flavour nuances of the beans involved, and understand their roasting requirements. I still think its worthwhile to roast individual batches, cup them after resting and if you think its going to work, blend two or more together in varying proportions until youre satisfied that youre getting the best from blending these particular varietals. If you still believe that the blend can be improved, and reckon you have just the right bean variety on hand to mix it with the others, then same routine as above.

    A lot of the beans we get from Andy are absolutely fantastic on their own and well worth appreciating as S.O. brews but as time goes along and you gain additional knowledge along with an ever more discriminating palate, then you can just let these guide you to realising some amazing blends. Its very satisfying when it all comes together the way you hoped. Have fun "swig".... ;D

    Mal.

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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Thanks fellow CS

    Quote Originally Posted by Mal link=1221649463/0#3 date=1221723824
    A lot of the beans we get from Andy are absolutely fantastic on their own and well worth appreciating as S.O. brews
    Mal, thats interesting as I always thought that you needed to blend to get a well rounded taste. *Ive always been curious about trying something like the ethiopian yirg or the limmu just off beanbay as a S.O. brew, but have never bothered because most of what Id read suggests that it sould be used as 20, 30 or 40 percent of the blend because they are bright tasting beans?

    I think I need to get a little more adventuous then & try a few S.O roasts instead of blending all the time! *I sure wouldnt have to worry about what "roasts well together" *:)

    Andrew *8-)

  6. #6
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Ive been into this coffee stuff for about two years now and still drink SOs 99.99% of the time.

  7. #7
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Quote Originally Posted by Secksy link=1221649463/0#4 date=1221732257
    Mal, thats interesting as I always thought that you needed to blend to get a well rounded taste. Ive always been curious about trying something like the ethiopian yirg or the limmu just off beanbay as a S.O. brew, but have never bothered because most of what Id read suggests that it sould be used as 20, 30 or 40 percent of the blend because they are bright tasting beans?

    I think I need to get a little more adventuous then & try a few S.O roasts instead of blending all the time! I sure wouldnt have to worry about what "roasts well together" :)
    Gday Andrew...

    It really does pay to learn how to "cup" all of your roasts as S.O.s before you think about blending them, not just to work out which beans may suit being blended with others but to get to know how different roast profiles affect the bean variety under scrutiny. This is the only "real" way to determine the ideal roast profile(s) of all the various beans you acquire and that will, in turn, lead you to a better appreciation of which beans are worth pursuing as candidates for blend experiments.
    Ive been at this for years mate and Ive barely scratched the surface IMHO... :-?

    Have fun mate, and experiment.... ;)

    Cheers,
    Mal.

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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Quote Originally Posted by Thundergod link=1221649463/0#5 date=1221734716
    Ive been into this coffee stuff for about two years now and still drink SOs 99.99% of the time.

    Ill second TG. I only blend beans when theres not enough at the bottom of each bag for an individual roast. No magic from me.

    Then again, Im not good at espresso yet... and Ive read extensively that great blends pull great shots. Also know that good single origins pull great shots too.

    This week Im bouncing around between Mexican Altura, Papua New Guinea, Guatemala and Bolivia. Last night I mixed the last bit of Guatemala with some Bolivia (is it possible to get even more chocolate!?) About 25% Guat, 75% Bolivia. Well see in a couple of days.

    CHAD

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    Re: Roasting different origins together

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    I know that DiBellas coffee in Brisane blend their beans before roasting - they tend to use South Americans and choose similar sized beans to blend.

    Campos in Brisbane blend post roast and for that they use a small cement mixer ( brand shiny new ofcourse ) but it still looks funny.



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