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Thread: Milk Pitchers

  1. #1
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    Milk Pitchers

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I recently had some guests for coffee and decided to use a larger milk pitcher which had been sitting on the shelf. Below are photos next to my regular 600ml pitcher.

    I have found that my steamed milk is more velvety and pours better with more symetrical and better looking rossettas than I was achieving before. I guess it has something to do with the spout of shape of the pitcher, or maybe just a coincidental improvement.

    The only problem is for single use I end up with too much steamed milk and prefer not to throw away or reheat.


  2. #2
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Looks to me like the Metallurgica Motta jug on the left (~750ml). I have just recently acquired one (thanks to the better half) and have found that the spout has made a huge difference - the thickness of the leaves on rosettas just seem to be perfect.

    However, on a side note, I am having huge trouble with consistency with this jug (I have the 500ml version and usually on steam for 1 latte), and similar to dannyhs question, is there a minimum amount of milk required for these jugs?
    ie. do you need to keep your milk level above the top of the cylindrical portion of the jug?

    Cheers,
    Ben

  3. #3
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Quote Originally Posted by 6D656A6C643E3B0F0 link=1256795674/1#1 date=1256796458
    is there a minimum amount of milk required for these jugs?
    ie. do you need to keep your milk level above the top of the cylindrical portion of the jug?
    There is a reason baristas have many jugs, generally with all jugs you want to fill them to around where the spout starts. If by doing this you are steaming too much milk then you need to buy a smaller jug. I bought a small one a couple of months ago day for single cups and it has made a huge difference in the quality I am able to deliver to customers.

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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Quote Originally Posted by 69676A657264650B0 link=1256795674/2#2 date=1256796960
    Quote Originally Posted by 6D656A6C643E3B0F0 link=1256795674/1#1 date=1256796458
    is there a minimum amount of milk required for these jugs?
    ie. do you need to keep your milk level above the top of the cylindrical portion of the jug?
    There is a reason baristas have many jugs, generally with all jugs you want to fill them to around where the spout starts. If by doing this you are steaming too much milk then you need to buy a smaller jug. I bought a small one a couple of months ago day for single cups and it has made a huge difference in the quality I am able to deliver to customers.
    I agree with what you said, but physically it doesnt really make sense. Especially with straight-walled jugs. What difference does it make if you fill to the spout, or a few cm below? You can still create a vortex and therefore incorporate the aerated milk into the normal milk.
    However, with a jug that has a combination of cylindrical and conical components, does this theory change?

  5. #5
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Quote Originally Posted by 575F50565E0401350 link=1256795674/3#3 date=1256797888
    Quote Originally Posted by 69676A657264650B0 link=1256795674/2#2 date=1256796960
    Quote Originally Posted by 6D656A6C643E3B0F0 link=1256795674/1#1 date=1256796458
    is there a minimum amount of milk required for these jugs?
    ie. do you need to keep your milk level above the top of the cylindrical portion of the jug?
    There is a reason baristas have many jugs, generally with all jugs you want to fill them to around where the spout starts. If by doing this you are steaming too much milk then you need to buy a smaller jug. I bought a small one a couple of months ago day for single cups and it has made a huge difference in the quality I am able to deliver to customers.
    I agree with what you said, but physically it doesnt really make sense. Especially with straight-walled jugs. What difference does it make if you fill to the spout, or a few cm below? You can still create a vortex and therefore incorporate the aerated milk into the normal milk.
    However, with a jug that has a combination of cylindrical and conical components, does this theory change?
    possibly due to the width to height ratio in a straight walled jug?

  6. #6
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Quote Originally Posted by 4E46494F471D182C0 link=1256795674/3#3 date=1256797888
    I agree with what you said, but physically it doesnt really make sense. Especially with straight-walled jugs. What difference does it make if you fill to the spout, or a few cm below? You can still create a vortex and therefore incorporate the aerated milk into the normal milk.
    However, with a jug that has a combination of cylindrical and conical components, does this theory change?

    You can disagree all you like but the proof is in the pudding, I agree with you in theory but I think that there would be some relationship between the width of the jug and the depth of the milk affecting the texture (too difficult for me to even contemplate thinking about :o)

  7. #7
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Quote Originally Posted by 020A05030B5154600 link=1256795674/3#3 date=1256797888
    I agree with what you said, but physically it doesnt really make sense. Especially with straight-walled jugs. What difference does it make if you fill to the spout, or a few cm below? You can still create a vortex and therefore incorporate the aerated milk into the normal milk.
    When steam is ejected from the steam tip it is coming at a fairly steep angle (fairly close to straight down). Because of this a minimum depth of milk is needed otherwise the steam overpowers the milk making it impossible to get a consistent and uniform whirlpool - resulting in poorly textured milk.

    That being said I usually find I can get just as good results by filling the jug up to 3/4 the height of the spout.

  8. #8
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    The larger one has a really heavy duty feel about it. I bought it on recommendation from a barista at cibo in Adelaide. In terms of microfoam it seems more forgiving when I lift too high and break the surface whilst steaming. The milk just seems to flow better from this spout. I will keep expirenmenting with both to see if this is coincidence or really a better pitcher for steaming.

    I fill up lower than the spout but cannot go much lower as the La Scala steam wand does not reach deep enough.

  9. #9
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    Quote Originally Posted by 020C010E190F0E600 link=1256795674/5#5 date=1256798774
    Quote Originally Posted by 4E46494F471D182C0 link=1256795674/3#3 date=1256797888
    I agree with what you said, but physically it doesnt really make sense. Especially with straight-walled jugs. What difference does it make if you fill to the spout, or a few cm below? You can still create a vortex and therefore incorporate the aerated milk into the normal milk.
    However, with a jug that has a combination of cylindrical and conical components, does this theory change?

    You can disagree all you like but the proof is in the pudding, I agree with you in theory but I think that there would be some relationship between the width of the jug and the depth of the milk affecting the texture (too difficult for me to even contemplate thinking about *:o)
    Correct, there would be a relationship between the width of the jug and the depth of the milk, but the effect of this would reduce significantly once you passed a specific point in terms of height of milk (cant really be bothered doing the fluid dynamics to actually work this out!).

    Any way, specifically in terms of the metallurgica jugs (with the variation in wall profile), have users of this jug found a specific level at which it becomes more difficult to achieve consistent microfoam?

  10. #10
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    Re: Milk Pitchers

    I am thinking that perhaps the extra weight means a more steady poor



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