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Thread: Steam technique

  1. #1
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    Steam technique

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all - I am a new member. I have a Gaggia classic with a Rancilio steam arm on it. I have been told 2 different ways to heat milk. One is to create the froth first then get the swirl happening (which is what i have been doing mostly) and the other is to get the swirl happening and the froth will appear anyway. Any opinions? Cheers

  2. #2
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    Re: Steam technique

    Im not familiar with the particular machine, but I always attempt to get a whirlpool happening which will then produce the microfoam, rather than dipping the steam tip in and out to encourage frothing.

    Doing the latter will generate foam sure enough, but it will be more like a meringue in consistency, rather than the velvety smooth microfoam we seek!

  3. #3
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    Re: Steam technique

    Quote Originally Posted by 3035283E335A0 link=1262821959/0#0 date=1262821959
    Hi all - I am a new member. I have a Gaggia classic with a Rancilio steam arm on it. I have been told 2 different ways to heat milk. One is to create the froth first then get the swirl happening (which is what i have been doing mostly) and the other is to get the swirl happening and the froth will appear anyway. Any opinions? Cheers
    Do you want froth or microfoam?

  4. #4
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    Re: Steam technique

    I have never used a Silvia. On my La Scala Butterfly which is a HX machine I stretch the milk by skimming the surface to inject air to about 70 degrees then plunge below and to the side more to get the whirlpool going. I get good microfoam this way. However I think this may depend on your steam power. I took some latte art classes with David Seng and on the much more powerful commercial machine we went for the whirlpool straight away. As I understood Davids explanation, the steaming was so powerful and whirlpool much stronger so that air is sucked in and theere is no need to skim the surface in order to stretch the milk as I had been doing at home.

  5. #5
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Steam technique

    Quote Originally Posted by 6F6A656572630B0 link=1262821959/3#3 date=1262827114
    I have never used a Silvia. On my La Scala Butterfly which is a HX machine I stretch the milk by skimming the surface to inject air to about 70 degrees then plunge below and to the side more to get the whirlpool going.
    Danny is that a typo?
    If you stretch to 70 degrees then go for a whirlpool the mlk will keep heating and overheat.

    IIRC you should have written 30 or 40 degrees (I cant remember exactly) then whirlpool while heating to 65/70oC.

  6. #6
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    Re: Steam technique

    Hi Bib,

    I think your second option is much better to use. Once you create the whirlpool action you can take the nozzle below the surface or on top of it to create more foam ( microfoam). :D

  7. #7
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    Re: Steam technique

    Quote Originally Posted by 576B766D676671646C67030 link=1262821959/4#4 date=1262830787
    Danny is that a typo?
    If you stretch to 70 degrees then go for a whirlpool the mlk will keep heating and overheat.

    IIRC you should have written 30 or 40 degrees (I cant remember exactly) then whirlpool while heating to 65/70oC. *

    I had a laugh ...yes Thundergod, it would be boiled milk *:-?. I forgot so say I somehow ended up getting used to a thermometer with Fahrenheit instead of celsius. *I meant 70 then 130 F or about 30 then 60 Celsius

  8. #8
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    Re: Steam technique

    Thanks everyone - I will continue to experiment using all your advice.

  9. #9
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    Re: Steam technique

    Just one thing for me to add, i was using a standard 600ml and 1lt jug, whilst i was able to get decent microfoam, it was inconsistent and the pour of art was average at best, it didnt bother me too much but decided to grab a 750 ml Motto Jug from coffee parts, it has made a MASSIVE difference, microfoam and art with ease now [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

    cheers
    warren

  10. #10
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    Re: Steam technique

    In regards to a Gaggia Classic, I would advise not to go above a 450ml jug. The little 100ml boiler really cant deal with too much steaming. But definitely agree with the Motta jug recommendation from warren.

    Get your whirlpoolin happening and good luck!



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