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Thread: Stovetop pots and milk

  1. #1
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    Stovetop pots and milk

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all

    Im wondering how people _without espresso machines_ texture milk at home?

    Ive recently acquired a Bialetti Moka (the smallest, 1 or 2 cup) pot for home coffee-making. Im planning on purchasing a small, but reasonable quality grinder so that I can grind-on-demand and use the stovetop pot to brew the freshly ground beans. (As much as an espresso machine at home would be lovely, its not a viable budget option in the immediate future and space is very limited in my kitchen.) I prefer a milk-containing coffee in the morning. But Im not sure how best to get good milk to go with my quite respectable coffee.

    At present, Im microwaving milk and adding the coffee. Not ideal. Ive briefly used a plunger-type apparatus that seems to generate a lot of froth and very little milk texture. Im told that there are (what amounts to) electronic whisks that you put into milk as it heats in a saucepan on the stove. Im also aware of the modified Mocha pots that have a milk chamber, or something (?), but Im not inclined to replace my well-functioning Moka pot!

    Are these good options for texturing and heating milk at home? Are there any other methods in use out there?

    I look forward to your advice!

    smallfry

  2. #2
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    Re: Stovetop pots and milk

    Smallfry,
    I very much doubt that its possible to get a milk as silky off the stove or out of a microwave as you would, had you textured it with a steam wand.
    my personal findings are that the best milk without steaming equipment is achieved from whisking the milk as its heated. this being the case, you will never achieve a well textured microfoam without a steam wand, as the microfoam is created by air being injected into the milk, and oxygen particles attaching themselves to the milks protien as it heats (someone correct me if im wrong).

    having said all that, hot milk is deffinately better in coffe over cold milk from the fridge, and i think that without a steam wand, this is all you can aim to achieve, warm milk.

  3. #3
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    Re: Stovetop pots and milk

    you can microwave the milk for 1 minute first then use a milk frother to texture milk ;)

  4. #4
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    Re: Stovetop pots and milk

    I have an aeropress at work, and used to just microwave milk to go with it.

    However, a month or so ago Aldi had a special on a milk frother. Its a stainless steel jug with a hot plate built into the bottom, and a motor with a whisk.

    It makes the milk taste MUCH better than microwaved. But, has a major downside. While the foam it creates is nice and smooth and fine (I am using A2 milk, by the way), there is a LOT of it. I prefer a flat white or latte to a cappuccino, so this isnt ideal for me. But its better than what I had before, so I am sticking with it for now.

  5. #5
    Senior Member SniffCoffee's Avatar
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    Re: Stovetop pots and milk


    I use a Presso for my coffee and use a Bellman stovetop coffeemaker to steam milk. You can get a Bellman just for steaming - check out the Sorrentina link.

  6. #6
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    Re: Stovetop pots and milk

    they look expensive (to use just for milk...).



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