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Thread: Frothing with EM4800

  1. #1
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    Frothing with EM4800

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Im using an EM4800 that has pretty wet steam and isnt the best for steaming,.. but i notice that with a bit of perseverence even a low end machine can produce rich velvety microfoam!

    1) get a milk thermometer
    2) warm up machine till steam is nice and consistent. It may require up to half a minute of purging. Then turn the steam off... wait 2 secs... and turn it on again. Somehow, it makes a more consistent dry steam that way.
    3) shove cold milk quickly into steam. Steam wand deep under surface. Angle the jug 30 degress off vertical and put the wand close to the rim of the jug. You should see the milk swirl.
    4) DONT start foaming immediately... wait until temp is about 15 deg on thermometer
    5) pull down jug until you hear a sucking sound.
    6) move jug downwards as the foam rises to keep sucking in air.
    7) stop foaming the milk by thrusting jug upwards as soon as you hit 35deg on the thermometer.
    8) heat the milk till the needle hits 60deg. (It would eventually settle at about 65)
    9) knock jug on table.
    10) fold the milk by spinning it around.

    viola... beautiful creamy foam.

    I find that with the right technique, full cream milk is just as easy to foam as light milk. In fact... i find that light milk simply makes it easier to create tasteless foam with large bubbles.

  2. #2
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    Re: Frothing with EM4800

    Thanks for the tips! My frothing technique with the EM4800C is similar (but simpler), but seems to work great, producing nice velvety microfooam.

  3. #3
    Ali
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    Re: Frothing with EM4800

    Thanks! These tips are great.

  4. #4
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Frothing with EM4800

    Quote Originally Posted by ezralimm link=1211440308/0#0 date=1211440307
    Im using an EM4800 that has pretty wet steam and isnt the best for steaming,.. but i notice that with a bit of perseverence even a low end machine can produce rich velvety microfoam!

    1) get a milk thermometer
    2) warm up machine till steam is nice and consistent. It may require up to half a minute of purging. Then turn the steam off... wait 2 secs... and turn it on again. Somehow, it makes a more consistent dry steam that way.
    3) shove cold milk quickly into steam. Steam wand deep under surface. Angle the jug 30 degress off vertical and put the wand close to the rim of the jug. You should see the milk swirl.
    4) DONT start foaming immediately... wait until temp is about 15 deg on thermometer
    5) pull down jug until you hear a sucking sound.
    6) move jug downwards as the foam rises to keep sucking in air.
    7) stop foaming the milk by thrusting jug upwards as soon as you hit 35deg on the thermometer.
    8) heat the milk till the needle hits 60deg. (It would eventually settle at about 65)
    9) knock jug on table.
    10) fold the milk by spinning it around.

    viola... beautiful creamy foam.

    I find that with the right technique, full cream milk is just as easy to foam as light milk. In fact... i find that light milk simply makes it easier to create tasteless foam with large bubbles.
    Yes, Im persevering with a Delonghi EC430 which has a fairly poor steam wand ..well just a nozzle really..and through trial and error this technique has worked for me too. I wonder about step 9 though. What is the purpose of that. Somewhere long ago before I knew about coffee snobs, I read an article where the author said if she noticed a barista banging the jug on the bench she would walk out. While not following her advice (on walking out) I never understood the need for it.

  5. #5
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    Re: Frothing with EM4800

    Banging the jug simply bursts any larger bubbles that may have crept in.

  6. #6
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    Re: Frothing with EM4800

    I have a EM3800 and Im assuming the frothing is quite similar.

    I have found that my best results are when I almost cut the frothing short part short and just aim to get the whirlpool. I then slowly raise the jug and if I start to get a real ch-ch-ch I tend to treat that as a sign the jug is too low than something to aim for. I also tend to not try to foam until the milk has warmed to the touch (but well before 35/40 deg) as this seems to cause big bubbles.

    Once I have it at about 35/40deg which is too hot for me to hold then I just leave the jug basically where it is, or move is maybe a couple of mm up and just let the whirlpool go. I tend to notice there is a definite change int he sound of the milk and thats where I stop the whole process, its generally to hot to touch which as my mark on the thermometer anyway.

    Doing this I have gotten a couple of great pours and awesome microfoam.

    I think for me the main points are not to try and foam too much, Ive foudn cutting this shorter and starting after the milk has warmed a little is best. The whirlpool at the end is highly important. I practiced on water for ages! If there is too much foam it will be hard to see what change you need ot make to get the whirlpool going which is probably why lots of foam hurts my performance.

    Anyway thats how Ive found it works for me.



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