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Thread: Using Raw Milk

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    Using Raw Milk

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Has anyone here used raw milk in there coffee to make lattes etc.

    Also does the taste/texturing differ ??

    I have found you can purchase it for "cosmetic" use in health food stores

    http://<br /> http://aphrodite.nouri...tes-bath-milk/

    places in this link for Melbourne coffee drinkers.

    Cheers

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Having parents with a Polish background and being brought up on a farm, I grew up on it. Has many health benefits, but also many people will find a reason to avoid it. Even today in Europe it is commonly available.
    I would be interested in your feedback, especially regarding taste. As a kid I did not mind it. I loved all the cheeses and yoghurts we made from it though.
    Good to see it is available, even if only for "cosmetic" purposes.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    I havent.
    Last time I used it was straight from the cow onto my weet-bix.
    I imagine it would texture differently, as the "full cream" milk you buy is definitely not the same as full cream from the cow.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    I tried it around 12 months ago now (Cleopatras). IMO its not worth the extra $$ (costs just under $8 for a 2lt bottle) for use with coffee.

    The texturing process effectively pasturises the milk, so you lose the benefit there.

    The flavour of the milk I find is unbeatable. I liken it to the difference between a lite-white vs full cream milk. It is a lot more yellow in appearance than regular full-cream milk.

    It used to be sold as pet milk years ago. Then they decided it wasnt even fit for pet consumption, so it had to be rebranded as cosmetic. The Cleopatras stuff is called "bath milk"... So go ahead and bathe your tastebuds in it ;)

    If it were cheaper, Id buy it more regularly. For now, I only grab it on the odd occasion.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Get a cow.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Quote Originally Posted by 162A372C262730252D26420 link=1274509708/4#4 date=1275103865
    Get a cow.
    Not all cows are milkers... Just ask my wife :D

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    $8 for 2 litres of milk. :exclamation
    Who is pocketing the profit in that sale? That certainly is some mark up even from supermarket milks.
    Price for our top quality milk out of the farm gate today 35 cents a litre.
    Wish we could share our raw milk with other C.S.s but strict laws prevent such. Our milk is rigouroulsy tested and laws are laws.
    Our raw milk always makes fantastic microfoam on our coffees. Coffees made with C.S. beans of course. ;)

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Quote Originally Posted by 676A7D6D666A0F0 link=1274509708/6#6 date=1275107539
    Price for our top quality milk out of the farm gate today 35 cents a litre
    :o
    OUCH!

    Quote Originally Posted by 676A7D6D666A0F0 link=1274509708/6#6 date=1275107539
    Wish we could share our raw milk with other C.S.sbut strict laws prevent such
    Dear Herbie,
    I would like to purchase some of the raw white facial scrub milk that you guys produce on your dairy farm. Certainly not for internal consumption but you better pack it in a cold esky anyway so it doesnt go off.

    ;D


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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Quote Originally Posted by 230C061B620 link=1274509708/7#7 date=1275117004
    Dear Herbie,
    I would like to purchase some of the raw white facial scrub milk that you guys produce on your dairy farm. *Certainly not for internal consumption but you better pack it in a cold esky anyway so it doesnt go off.
    Bugger... If I could only trust the transport companies... *I would suggest my wife and daughter need to *support me in taking care of my skin and I would be doing the same... *Facial scrub for an ex smoker (bout *4.5 weeks clean) to see if some of the elasticity and condition can be recovered..

    I hear that the grasses and other raw materials out Deniliquin way make for great results..

    Due to the damage over the last 40 years.. I reckon I would need *between 20L and 25L of that scrub a week.. *Is it still possible to get a 20L SS barrel ? *Bugger the bulk storage at my end is not up to scratch.. *

    Andy; I reckon your big fridges could manage it... Lucky bugger.

    YEP... @ 35c The middle man sure does have some questions to answer :-X

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    I forgot to come back to this...

    Herbie,

    Given the local market here in Canberra sees most of the Cleopatras bath milk (I havent seen Aphrodites anywhere here yet) is pre-sold and you have a VERY slim chance of finding it on a shelf somewhere, one would have to assume that the demand is actually quite strong for the product.

    According to this article back in 2007 Cleopatras were shipping 1000 litres a day of the stuff around Australia.

    I have also considered going into a herdshare program with some others that enjoy raw milk. Id give some links, but the sites Im aware of seem to be having issues right now (hope they havent shut up shop)...

    I suspect the dairy gets a bigger portion than 35c from the raw stuff. I believe that Cleopatra Dairy ended up installing their own bottling plant, so the amount of handling from teet-to-bottle is reduced further.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Quote Originally Posted by 455552444278270 link=1274509708/3#3 date=1275083640
    The flavour of the milk I find is unbeatable. *I liken it to the difference between a lite-white vs full cream milk. *It is a lot more yellow in appearance than regular full-cream milk.
    Not sure if this counts as raw milk, but Ive been using Over The Moon milk which is pasteurised but unhomogenised. The difference between this milk and normal milk is as you describe - like lite vs full cream. Give it a go - makes a God-shot latte/cap everytime. The milk is sold mainly direct from farm at selected growers markets around Sydney (Lilyfield, Frenchs Forest, Pyrmont, Castle Hill) as well as selected Harris Farm stores - Broadway springs to mind.

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    Senior Member Bosco_Lever's Avatar
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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Quote Originally Posted by 33352636353331540 link=1274509708/10#10 date=1279026896
    Not sure if this counts as raw milk, but Ive been using Over The Moon milk which is pasteurised but unhomogenised.
    Raw milk is unpasteurised. Unprocessed as nature intended.
    There are many companies around Australia selling pasteurised but unhomogenised milk. They pride themselves on their product which is usually of a very high standard and great flavour.
    I believe the easiest way of obtaining raw milk at the moment is to take part in herdshare programs as stated above.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    A good friend of mine owns a dairy here in the south east of S.A. and only the other day I tasted some, still warm, strait out the pre-vat pipe valve. First thought, YUM, second thought, whats it like in coffee?!?!?

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    So why didnt you try it in coffee?

    That reminds me of a visit to my aunts place and trying some warm milk, straight out of the bucket; it had only been in the cow a few minutes earlier.
    If you like warm milk on your cereal it saves heating it back up.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    whats that stuff the woolies now sell

    un hogimised and un - pasturised

    its in the organic section at my local in a white and green carton (1L) maybe part of the Macro brand?

    is that raw ? or as close as you can get at the supermarket...

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    Re: Using Raw Milk

    Dont think that would be legal will have to check next time I am in woolies.

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    Re: Using Raw Milk


    i was wrong..... sorry

    I was thinking of Pauls Milk Parmalat Pure Organic

    but its been pasteurised as i just looked at it on parmalat. com. au

    all you princesses that wanted to swim in it will have to look elsewhere...... ;D


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    Googled for information about texturing with raw milk and found this old thread. I buy raw milk from a nearby dairy but it textures really poorly. Same with unhomogenised organic whole milk. Anyone else got any experience trying to texture raw milk?

    Alan

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    Quote Originally Posted by alanc View Post
    I buy raw milk from a nearby dairy but it textures really poorly. Anyone else got any experience trying to texture raw milk?

    Alan
    You'll probably find they skimmed most of the cream off most of the milk. Depending on the cow and what they're eating you can get about 30% cream.

    As for the texturing - just make sure before you use the milk for any purpose give it a good shake to distribute the cream evenly beforehand so you don't just use up the cream in the first pour. You shouldn't find any difference other than that. Don't go too high on the temp either otherwise it gets a bitter taste. No more than 60 but better 50-55 degrees.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Javafrog View Post
    You'll probably find they skimmed most of the cream off most of the milk. Depending on the cow and what they're eating you can get about 30% cream.

    As for the texturing - just make sure before you use the milk for any purpose give it a good shake to distribute the cream evenly beforehand so you don't just use up the cream in the first pour. You shouldn't find any difference other than that. Don't go too high on the temp either otherwise it gets a bitter taste. No more than 60 but better 50-55 degrees.
    I agree with the first point, it may actually be a high butterfat to protein ratio that makes it difficult to texture. But if raw milk became bitter after heating above 60 degrees all commercial milk would be, seeing as it's all been pasteurised.

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    Now we have left the dairyfarm and our lovely raw milk straight from the cow is no longer available to us we have done a lot of trying different milks in the last year we have been in Brisvagus. Our choice for the best result here is Maleny Full Cream milk from Gurnsey cows which is of course like many other small producers around Australia is only found on sale in a limited geographical area.
    As for the raw milk the milk is taken from the cows and pumped straight through stainless steel pipes to the bulk milk vat. Samples are taken for the factory of milk quality by the tanker driver and then it is pumped into the milk tanker. No skimming of fat etc occurs. We had 36 years of using raw milk in our coffees and it foams so well. Smooth and oh so delicious. Average milk straight from the cow is 3 to 41/2 % fat depending on the breed and the feed. Protein averages 31/2 % also. That makes the milk froth. By the way farmers in the Southern Riverina (those that are left in the shrinking industry) are now getting 30 cents a litre for their milk. Not enough to make a living from!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    Dont ever drink raw milk, was the cause of TB infection in my neck glands when a child and is still considered a health risk, check out health warnings re drinking raw milk or cheese current today ...

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    Senior Member Logga's Avatar
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    Using Raw Milk

    Quote Originally Posted by herbie View Post
    Now we have left the dairyfarm and our lovely raw milk straight from the cow is no longer available to us we have done a lot of trying different milks in the last year we have been in Brisvagus. Our choice for the best result here is Maleny Full Cream milk from Gurnsey cows which is of course like many other small producers around Australia is only found on sale in a limited geographical area.
    As for the raw milk the milk is taken from the cows and pumped straight through stainless steel pipes to the bulk milk vat. Samples are taken for the factory of milk quality by the tanker driver and then it is pumped into the milk tanker. No skimming of fat etc occurs. We had 36 years of using raw milk in our coffees and it foams so well. Smooth and oh so delicious. Average milk straight from the cow is 3 to 41/2 % fat depending on the breed and the feed. Protein averages 31/2 % also. That makes the milk froth. By the way farmers in the Southern Riverina (those that are left in the shrinking industry) are now getting 30 cents a litre for their milk. Not enough to make a living from!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I agree with Herbie, we use raw milk here in New Zealand (which is $5 for two litres) and the taste is so much better than pasteurised milk which in saying that I cannot drink milk based coffees in cafes anymore because to me pasteurised milk tastes foul now.
    In regards to texturing raw milk its fine, you have to shake the bottle to mix the cream with the rest of it and away you go- very delicious milk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by balwoges View Post
    Dont ever drink raw milk, was the cause of TB infection in my neck glands when a child and is still considered a health risk, check out health warnings re drinking raw milk or cheese current today ...
    Australia is now free from Bovine tuberculosis (TB). The last case in cattle was detected in March 2002.

    Since 1970 cattle herds have been tested and infected cattle have been culled.

    Pasteurisation of our milk was introduced when these diseases were common and prior to refrigeration on the farm and during transport.

    While many of the reasons for pasteurisation have disappeared, government agencies are reluctant to allow milk without it to be sold as they will come under fire with any cases of disease spread by milk.

    Sale of unpasteurised Cleopatra milk, supposably for bathing, is illegal as there is a fair chance it might be consumed.

    Goats milk can be sold without pasteurisation when from a registed herd.

    For a lot of my life I drank raw goats milk without any harmful effects.



    Barry
    Last edited by Barry_Duncan; 11th February 2013 at 10:42 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Duncan View Post
    Australia is now free from Bovine tuberculosis (TB). The last case in cattle was detected in March 2002.

    Since 1970 cattle herds have been tested and infected cattle have been culled.

    Pasteurisation of our milk was introduced when these diseases were common and prior to refrigeration on the farm and during transport.

    While many of the reasons for pasteurisation have disappeared, government agencies are reluctant to allow milk without it to be sold as they will come under fire with any cases of disease spread by milk.

    Sale of unpasteurised Cleopatra milk, supposably for bathing, is illegal as there is a fair chance it might be consumed.

    Goats milk can be sold without pasteurisation when from a registed herd.

    For a lot of my life I drank raw goats milk without any harmful effects.




    Barry
    I agree wholeheartedly with Barry, TB and brucellosis have been effectively eradicated from all dairy and meat herds in Aus an NZ. Adults with normal immunity are at minimal risk from raw milk, however children and immunosupressed adults should avoid consuming raw milk (and Unpasteurised cheese - yum...). Of course legislation has to cover all eventualities so raw milk is not commercially available.

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    Quote Originally Posted by balwoges View Post
    Yep. Consuming raw milk is potentially hazardous for children and immunosupressed adults (incl. pregnant women) - but minimal risk to healthy adults, there's no point living in fear, even less point trying to spread it. You don't see the government putting a blanket ban on deli meats - but they carry the same risks.

    Just to clarify my perspective, I'm not against the restriction on sale of raw milk to the public. If you can't stop people smoking around their children or make them vaccinate their kids, you certainly can't prevent them giving their kids raw milk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by balwoges View Post
    Don't go to France then, most of the best cheeses are made with raw milk.
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    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Why fly overseas when you can stay right here and risk your life with local cheeses

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinitasse View Post
    Why fly overseas when you can stay right here and risk your life with local cheeses
    Only if you decide to roll a wheel of pasteurised brie across the road.

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    Listeria outbreak serious, AMA warn

    A LISTERIA outbreak linked to a Victorian cheese factory has claimed a third life.

    A 68-year-old NSW man died from the infection last month, a Victorian health department spokesman confirmed on Sunday.

    A Tasmanian man, 44, and a Victorian man, 88, have also died of the illness.

    A total of 26 cases, including the three fatal cases and one miscarriage, have now been linked to the Jindi cheese factory in Gippsland.
    Listeria outbreak claims a third life | News.com.au

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    Unfortunate, but you've better chance of winning the lottery than dying from Listeriosis if you're otherwise well. BTW deli meats, pre-washed salads and pre-made sandwiches are a much better source of Listeria than Australian cheese or milk
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    Raw milk, being unpasteurised. The interesting thing is that to pasteurise milk it must be held at a set temp for a set amount of time. 63c = 30min, 75 = 12min and so on so the hotter the shorter it needs to be held at a specific temp for. How hot do you take milk to when you stretch it for your coffee? it may actually be long and hot enough to complete the pasteurising process.

    There is no doubt the milk solids change state after pasteurising, as well as their potential flavours from nursing all those sugars and fats that are in raw milk.

    I have raw milk, but drink only espresso. so in short i have no idea, but would love to here from an expert.

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    And if those affected cheeses were made from raw milk (which they weren't), 'raw' would have got the blame and the farmer probably gaol time.

    I used to buy Cleopatras all the time (@$9 for 2L), but typically it was consumed even before I got home it is so delicious. I'm not sure I could bring myself to wreck it with coffee.

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    Senior Member mwcalder05's Avatar
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    So a couple of weeks back, I tried some raw milk and so I bought a bottle today. I can't describe how nice it is compared to the Woolies watered down $2 crap! This was my first time trying it as I was born too late to experience it earlier. It was so creamy and rich.
    Can't wait to see how it steams.. (don't worry, i'll only make a piccolo)

    Mike

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    I think that more people get sick from eating raw egg than from raw milk. Therefore to be safe, eggs should only be sold hard boiled.

    Barry

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Duncan View Post
    I think that more people get sick from eating raw egg than from raw milk.
    So true. By a factor of several hundred to one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Duncan View Post
    I think that more people get sick from eating raw egg than from raw milk. Therefore to be safe, eggs should only be sold hard boiled.

    Barry
    soft boiled at least so you can still use them in cakes.

    Pretty sad to hear about the pricing of milk though. How we are lead under the rule of coles and woolies ridiculous over pricing of everything. I realise free market etc etc. But ive seen Woolies balance sheets (for a study we had to do) and its pretty disgusting. Im sure coles are in the same boat.

    Raw milk sounds interesting though. Should check it out

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    Getting back to the coffee milk frothing side again, I have a pizza fest here in my wood fired oven, on Australia Day with some very old school friends from 45 years ago. We finish off the session with home roasted cappucinos and they love it all. One of the guests has a dairy farm and hopefully will bring some fresh raw milk straight out of the cow and into the refrigerated bulk 1200l vat, which incidently is emptied everyday. I am anxious to try it as I am not happy with the fat reduced milk, ie they claim 2%, but more than likely nearer 1%. I obviously need to try it myself before making 20 or so for the guests but can't see why it wouldn't be great.
    Any other suggestions??

    Neill

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    Well the results are in. It doesn't work!
    Well, not in my case anyway, as my friend said, six hours earlier, the milk was grass in the paddock, so you can't get it much fresher, he got it just before the milk truck came and when I frothed it, there was very little sign of it wanting to froth, even took it up to almost 80C and it looked like you just shook the milk in a bottle, very few bubble.
    So out with the processed "full cream milk " cartons, only claiming 2% and whollah, no problems. On speaking with the dairy farmer, he has numerous awards for his pastures that his herd feed upon, and he claims that the milk needs to be homogenised to perform as I want.
    An interesting exercise but I guess that I just need to continue using the processed milk.


    Neill

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    I too have tried steaming unhomogenized milk and it just refused to behave. It is certainly true that milk with a higher fat content is easier to work with (full cream vs. skim) so I would agree that the key element seems to be homogenization which ensures the fat is evenly distributed throughout the milk. One experiment that could be performed is to take some skim milk, add an appropriate quantity of cream to it to give the same amount of milk fat as full cream, give it a quick shake and see how it textures- whether it behaves like skim milk, full cream milk, or something different entirely.

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    I wonder, has anyone used goats milk for their latte?

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    I grew up on a farm drinking milk as nature intended, it tasted so much better that the stuff we buy now, the cows were TB tested and it didn't hurt us kids one bit. A while back I visited my uncles dairy farm and scoffed half a litre of ice cold milk straight out of the chilling vat. It was amazing. I've not had the opportunity to try this in coffee though.
    I did try some un-homogenised guernsey milk from Maleney Dairys recently, tasted really great in the coffee just wouldn't texture well at all, giant foamy bubbles.

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    A guy is keeping a few head of fresian in our farm that he hand milks everyday for sale at local market. He wants to teach me so I am the emergency milker. I haven't bit yet as the fresian milk is a bit hard. That said they aren't grain fed which makes a big difference to cream quantity and character. Clover fed guernsey cattle seems the best option - but strain the milk first and don't bring it up over 50 degrees. I stop at forty. You can top with the cream you strained later. Its tempting to do the milking myself as I process my own coffee from rogue cattui in my area of Nimbin (picked about 40 kg of DGB this year)). I could literally pick my own coffee and milk my own cow one day, and in a couple of days time have a fresh cuppa of my own making entirely.

    I reckon the supermarket goat milk would go okay, though haven't tried it as yet - put goats milk with a strong natural, I'd say, and you will double hairs on your chest. Might be better cold in cold brewed coffee, as can be done with coconut milk.

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    I have friends who have 20 or so cows they do provide the local Tweed Heads health food shops with "bath milk" at around 5-6$ for 2L, they also make small amounts of the nicest butter and thick cream. I don't know if they produce enough to supply a coffee shop on top of their health food shops but I can give you their details if you pm me.** if you have Facebook check out pure bath milk, Carool.**
    I grew up drinking raw milk on a dairy farm when we moved from the farm to town I couldn't stomach the half water half milk like substance that is provided for consumption. Don't tell anyone but I still like to shake the milk bottle he he, old habits die hard and that cream on top is to die for. I need to stop thinking about it, making me want to buy a farm.

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    A 20 cow dairy herd is rather small these days.

    I remember when a dairy farmer who had a big lottery win was asked what he would spend the money on he said " on the farm so I can keep farming for a few more years until the money runs out."

    Barry

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    Hey smokey: I made goats' milk lattes for a while and actually had two customers who loved them. I was experimenting after listening to Dave Schomer get excited about being a roasting rebel at SCAA Seattle in 1997(?). Personally, I thought they tasted awful. I liked the 7-Up latte better. I just made a Torani Bacon Syrup milk steamer last night - I wonder if it would be good in a mocha?

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    ive made coffee with raw milk at home before

    what I found was that the milk itself is so dense that you steam it as usual only to find that its still cold when you serve it! Why? Because of its rick and creamy structure it seems that the steam gets trapped in the bottom half of the jug, as it cant actually circulate properly - so you pour it and drink for an amazing wtf? moment - and yes, its happened to me more than once - could be unique to the brand though...

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    I have been having iced coffee all summer in Perth form a bialetti 6cup and cosmetic milk from a local supplier. Best thing ever(so far) fresh coffee from manna beans or 5 senses ground in antique European grinder.
    We get it in 20-25 liter batches, looking for a better grinder for a 12 or 15 cup stove top kettle

  50. #50
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    5
    I strongly suggest not using raw milk for human consumption. Both listeria and toxoplasmosis can be contracted by doing so (just like from raw eggs), in addition to bovine tuberculosis, brucellosis and salmonella. This is the reason raw milk can not be legally obtained in most regions of Australia.

    That said, I loved it when I was a kid, as mu grandma had two cows and was extremelly skilled at crafting all kinds of raw milk products.



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