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Thread: Tried non-homogenised milk?

  1. #1
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    Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Recently we have been able to purchase non-homogenised milk produced within approx 100k from where we live on NW coast of Tassie.
    However I have been finding it harder to get decent microfoam compared to normal milk.
    (For those that arent sure, non-homogenised is the one where the cream floats to the top and has to be shaken before each use)
    So far I have found that a longer stretching time seems to help with microfoam generation, but there also seems to be some taste difference which I am not quite happy with.

    Has anybody else tried this and what results did you get?

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Coincidently, a local dairy farmer brought some straight out of the cow milk (that mornings) to my workplace in Wynyard (NW Tas).* It was the first time that I had tried un-homogenised milk.* Interestingly, it didnt have the same mouthfeel as the Pura blue that we normally use.* I suspect that we are talking the milk equivalent of a single origin here whereas the commercial milks are a blend.* Still working with it - will report back.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1E302939031433292F395C0 link=1298510165/1#1 date=1298519938
    I suspect that we are talking the milk equivalent of a single origin
    More like a single tree.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 664851417B6C4B515741240 link=1298510165/1#1 date=1298519938
    straight out of the cow
    Whats the name of the cow?

    Barry

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    I believe that he has three hundred girls but since you ask I will inquire. I can see a marketing opportunity here:* Double shot latte - Daisy or Jezzabelle?

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 183B282823051E2F34393B345A0 link=1298510165/3#3 date=1298525076
    Whats the name of the cow?
    As long as it isnt Angus...

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Unhomogenized milk is harder to work with. Its all to do with the size of the fat globules. Too much fat = unstable foam.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    http://www.jimseven.com/2006/12/16/why-wont-my-milk-foam/

    http://www.jimseven.com/2006/06/13/foams/

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Thanks ang k and Randy for the comments and info, seems to agree with what I found myself.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 745A4353697E59434553360 link=1298510165/1#1 date=1298519938
    Coincidently, a local dairy farmer brought some straight out of the cow milk (that mornings) to my workplace in Wynyard (NW Tas).* It was the first time that I had tried un-homogenised milk.* Interestingly, it didnt have the same mouthfeel as the Pura blue that we normally use.* I suspect that we are talking the milk equivalent of a single origin here whereas the commercial milks are a blend.
    Not only unhomogenised but would also be non pasteurised. Pure milk otherwise.
    Commercial milk is more than a "blend" unfortunately.
    It is "processed". Hence the different "mouthfeel".
    The path that transforms healthy milk products into allergens and carcinogens begins with modern feeding methods that substitute high-protein, soy-based feeds for fresh green grass and breeding methods to produce cows with abnormally large pituitary glands so that they produce three times more milk than the old fashioned scrub cow. These cows need antibiotics to keep them well.
    Their milk is then pasteurised destroying all valuable enzymes.
    Literally dozens of other precious enzymes are destroyed in the pasteurisation process. Without them, milk is very difficult to digest. The human pancreas is not always able to produce these enzymes; over-stress of the pancreas can lead to diabetes and other diseases.
    The butterfat of commercial milk is homogenised, subjecting it to rancidity. Even worse, butterfat may be removed altogether to make skim milk, sold as a health food but the truth is, butterfat is in milk for a reason.
    Without it, the body cannot absorb and utilise the vitamins and minerals in the water fraction of the milk. Along with valuable trace minerals and short chain fatty acids, butterfat is the best source of preformed vitamin A.
    Synthetic vitamin D, known to be toxic to the liver, is added to replace the natural vitamin D complex in butterfat. Butterfat also contains re-arranged acids, which have strong anti-carcinogenic properties.
    Non-fat dried milk is added to 1% and 2% milk. Unlike the cholesterol in fresh milk, which plays a variety of health promoting roles, the cholesterol in non-fat dried milk is oxidized and it is this rancid cholesterol that promotes heart disease.

    Lucky Bullitt and Blue House living in Tassie and having access to real milk!* :)

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 6D435049260 link=1298510165/9#9 date=1303979400
    These cows need antibiotics to keep them well.
    And even then some percentage suffer mastitis. As the milk from individual cows is blended during processing, ALL commercially available milk has a non-zero SCC (somatic cell count) with maximum limits set by local health authorities around the world.

    If youre not squeamish and want to know more, just do a google search for milk blood pus.


    Milk sold today is not the same as it used to be.

    I do remember reading that beer is actually better for you than milk (with similar daily consumption quantities), but it does taste even worse in espresso :(

    I just have to drink beer and coffee at opposite ends of the day and life is good ;D

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    As dairyfarmers who are tested stringently for milk quality we are a little distressed at what is being written here. We wonder if the members commenting negativley have worked in the industry? If so is the information true or a members taking "scare tactics" from the internet?
    Let us assure you that our milk is tested everyday starting with the milk in our vat even before the tanker leaves our farm. If we did not meet that test we would have to pull the pin on the vat of milk and down the drain it would go. In our case if done that would be 17,000 litres for the day. If we do not toe the line for quality we are heavily fined or even jailed. Never had that as we only send quality. Yes we do drink raw milk. We also drink milk from shops.
    However we know that the milk company we supply our milk to will not take anything but quality milk. They are also checked stringently.
    As for blood and pus in milk that is not on for quality milk being supplied to a dairy company. We have to test bucket our cows if they present with this and tip that milk down the drain (32 litres per day per cow) until we are happy that we have quality milk. Never used such milk. Who would want it? Give dairyfarmers some credit please. It is a business like any other business and has to conform to requirements or pay the penalties. Let us keep this discussion to non-homogenised milk.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Herbie, Im not surprised you are distressed, perfectly understandable reaction.

    I note you dont refute the claim that the somatic cell count standard is above zero. The standards are there for all to read.
    As to your request to keep discussion specifically to non-homogenised milk, fair point.

    The majority of my family still drink milk and if it was available, we would buy non homogenised milk by preference as the homogenising process causes undesirable changes in the milk fats as well as altering the taste and texture of the product.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Herbie, my post was in no way aimed at dairy farmers. Like any farmers or growers in this country you guys have a huge struggle to keep in business.
    I just wish the public had the choice to access the product in those tankers that leave your farm.
    Its the road travelled thereafter that involves (in my view) unnecessary modifications in the structure, creating a synthetic nutrient depleted product to increase shelf life.
    You will notice that raw milk left out will sour naturally but pasteurised milk will rot. This is because the beneficial bacteria in the raw milk helps to keep putrefactive bacteria under control. Pasteurised milk, however, does not have any of the beneficial bacteria left to keep it from rotting.
    As with any food, coffee included, fresher is always better and this applies to milk as well. Fresh raw milk is creamier and better tasting than pasteurised milk that has a shelf life of several weeks. Ultra-high-temperature milk can be stored without refrigeration for about six months.
    Even people who have never liked the taste of milk find that raw milk has a soothing, pleasant taste that they canít resist.
    Its perfectly legal to drink raw milk from your own cow, yet illegal to sell for human consumption.* :-?


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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    having tried non-homogenised, homogenised full fat, skim, soy, and nut milks; non-homogenised always gives the best results : tight micro foam . I am now thinking to add cream to homogenised milk to give it that smooth texture. Im also let down when buying a quality cafe coffee to have its flavour overpowered by a grassy standard milk. does anyone have a similar experience?

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Ive been using unhomogenised milk with my Breville CR for some time - I havent had any problems with the texture so far. I use Parmalat organic unhomogenised. Might give A2 a go and see if the results are different.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Tried cows milk unprocessed from my mums friend who was visiting.

    In its pure form, it is the best milk i have tasted on its own, and in coffee it is fantastic.

    Every now and then i have to give the bottle a quick shake so that the cream on top is incorporated through.

    Nothing else is better. Love it.

    Recently have tasted cheese imported from Europe that used un-pasteurised milk from certain breed of sheep as well as cows.
    Cheese certainly benefits from un-pasteurized and un-homogenized milk.

    Obviously the laws here dictates you have to process milk before retail due to health reasons, which is a pity.

    When milk is processed, flavour suffers.

    Gary at G

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 667C717062746C6666150 link=1298510165/16#16 date=1314856659
    When milk is processed, flavour suffers.
    Unfortunately, its not only the flavour that suffers. :(
    Raw milk is an outstanding source of nutrients including beneficial bacteria such as lactobacillus acidophilus, vitamins and enzymes, and it is one of the finest sources of calcium available.
    The pasteurisation process, which entails heating the milk to a temperature of 145 degrees to 150 degrees F and keeping it there for at least half an hour and then reducing the temperature to not more than 55 degrees F, completely changes the structure of the milk proteins (denaturization) into something far less than healthy. While the process certainly destroys germs and bad bacteria, it also destroys the milkís beneficial bacteria along with many of its nutritious components.
    Pasteurising milk destroys enzymes, diminishes vitamin, denatures fragile milk proteins, destroys vitamin B12, and vitamin B6, kills beneficial bacteria and promotes pathogens. You may notice that raw milk left out will sour naturally but pasteurised milk will rot. This is because the beneficial bacteria in the raw milk helps to keep putrefactive bacteria under control. Pasteurised milk, however, does not have any of the beneficial bacteria left to keep it from rotting.

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 0F21322B440 link=1298510165/17#17 date=1314877279
    Pasteurising milk destroys enzymes, diminishes vitamin, denatures fragile milk proteins, destroys vitamin B12, and vitamin B6, kills beneficial bacteria and promotes pathogens.
    Personally, I think pasteurisation is unnecessary for milk from healthy cows, and I think its bizarre that raw milk is illegal to sell. The best yoghurt Ive ever eaten was contraband.

    You might be right about the bacteria. But... your list of ills is too long. B12 is temperature stable and according to some quick research you might lose 20% of B6. Those fragile proteins are going to get denatured and then hydrolised into their amino acid components as soon as they get to your stomach anyway. ;)

    What do the enzymes in milk do? Do they help people who lack the enzymes for digesting milk?

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    Re: Tried non-homogenised milk?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2A35372D3421363720580 link=1298510165/5#5 date=1298531580
    Quote Originally Posted by 183B282823051E2F34393B345A0 link=1298510165/3#3 date=1298525076
    Whats the name of the cow?
    As long as it isnt Angus...
    made me laugh



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