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Thread: Milk jug recommendations

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    Milk jug recommendations

    Hi All,
    Iíve been using a 500 ml jug to froth milk with my Via Venezia (with Breville ES800 steam wand). I only want to use a little milk for one latte and donít like wastage if I can avoid it, so I think I need to look at something smaller like a 300 ml jug. Iíd like to get more into the fun of coffee art.
    There seem to be a lot of options out there and much variation in price for what seems to be premiums for brand and aesthetics. Is there really that much difference between a $15 jug and a $50 jug if they have similar characteristics - shape, spout, etc? If so, can someone recommend a good brand.
    Thanks,
    Paul

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    Many thanks Paul - I think I'll give that a go.

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    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    If they're the same shape, spout and material then of course a different logo won't make much difference... but the reality is the more expensive jugs tend to have a much better shape for texturing and pouring. I could speculate that it's simpler or cheaper to manufacture a simple slightly conical jug with triangular spout than the more rounded shapes... but that's just a guess.

    I have a 300ml Cafelat jug from Beanbay; the difference between it and the 500ml jug that came with my Sunbeam and a small jug I bought from a kitchen shop is night and day. Aside from the different shape, it uses a much heavier gauge and higher quality metal, and has a much better finish. I can't say it's made me a latte art champion, but it's certainly a joy to use and I can no longer blame my tools

    I also tend to waste less milk as I can texture a smaller amount without blasting it out of the jug, but that's likely mostly due to dialing down the steam pressure on my ECM a touch.

    The Tiamo is a similar shape, and I've also drooled over them as I reckon the matt black finish would look pretty awesome with the black frame on my Synchronika; don't reckon you'd go wrong with either option.
    Last edited by Magic_Matt; 6th July 2016 at 09:03 AM.

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    Senior Member brettreaby's Avatar
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    have a look at the cafelat 400ml jug; i switched to this and its way better than the standard design.

    Also, i measure the sweet spot of milk and its actually 250 ml not sure why its rated at 400ml.

    They are usually on this website in bean bay but currently offline. also available elsewhere.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I use one of these Metallurgica Motta Europa Milk Jug | Talk Coffee 350 ML, great little jug, perfect milk each and every time.

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    Cool - thanks guys!

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    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Be aware that there's lots of other factors that go together to create good milk and good latte art, so don't be disappointed if the new jug doesn't work any magic. In saying that it definitely helps. My current favourite is actually a 400ml Sunbeam jug. I've had 4 of them in the past and each one has been slightly different. Most don't have enough of a spout, but this one has a nice pointy, defined spout. I also have a Tiamo 300ml Teflon jug which is awesome. The Cafelat ones are great but I've only used the 600ml, not the 400ml. I've tried a couple of the Motta Europa style and haven't really liked them with my machine as they seem to work better if you've got a nice long steam wand and lots of steam power, neither of which I've got. Give a few different ones a go if you can, but the Cafelat would be a good place to start.
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    Similarly anyone want to expand recommendations on 600mL jugs? I generally do two lattes every morning. I have the Cafelat 600mL and it has such a wide spout that it tends to pour back like a cheap chinese teapot if you under pour, and if you try pouring more it comes out the sides of the spout.

    Currently on a cheap 'Chef' brand that i picked up at a homewares store, that has a similar spout to the Metallurgica above, its ok but quite annoying nonetheless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    I use one of these Metallurgica Motta Europa Milk Jug | Talk Coffee 350 ML, great little jug, perfect milk each and every time.

    My favourite too :-) Nice to use, the shape works well and it is made of nice thick stainless steel.

    Regards,

    Matt

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    Another vote for the Motta 350ml jug. I keep it in the freezer. Thick, heavy stainless steel get really cold and gives you ample time to texture the milk.

    Cheers,

    Sam
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    I had a laugh. Any recommendations on a 2L jug? When you have 10 hot chochoes lined up a 350ml jug just won't cut it ...

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    I just picked up a Rocket 550 ml jug and very impressed with the feel look and quality.
    They make a 350 ml version that i`m also thinking of investing in.

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    I have a standard 400ml Trenton $12 and it's worked great. I just bought a smaller 200ml version from aliexpress for piccolos

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    I've just picked up a Rhinowares Professional 600 ml jug with interior volume markings. Very useful. I suck at latte art, whatever the brand of jug, so can't comment on that aspect of its utility!

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    Hi Scharvey, may I know where did you get your milk jug from? I'm looking for a good quality jug with volume markings but not too expensive Thank you.

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    I'm looking at purchasing a espro toroid pitcher or a bell pitcher type. Any advice would help.
    Just wanting to produce some good latte art on a rocket Evo V2

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    A big fan of the Espro toroid I noticed a big improvement when I moved from a jug which came with my first sunbeam espresso machine to the Espro toroid. I struggled to tame full power on my vbm domobar super for small amounts of milk ... I even had toothpicks jammed in 2 of the 4 the steam points, until I used the Espro toroid.
    Last edited by Nickm523; 18th June 2017 at 02:19 PM. Reason: Autocorrect fail

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    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    The cafelat jugs available in Beanbay are terrific - I use mine daily despite having some much more expensive jugs.
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    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    The cafelat jugs available in Beanbay are terrific - I use mine daily despite having some much more expensive jugs.
    +1 to that. They're great jugs. I'd recommend the smaller one for most domestic applications. I think it's called a 400ml. The 600ml is just a bit big.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    The cafelat jugs available in Beanbay are terrific - I use mine daily despite having some much more expensive jugs.
    Where in Beanbay? I can't find it anywhere!
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    They are off-line for stocktake and should appear in the new financial year (ie: a few weeks).
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    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    Thought I was going crazy for a minute there! 😅
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    Oh, OK. I'll look again in a couple of weeks.

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    Hi Paul

    I always use Rhinoware Jugs which are thick, heavy and brilliantly priced. You can get them for around $17 for a 360ml jug which is perfect for a mug or large cup and add a bit less for a standard cup.

    Mike K

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgseye View Post
    Hi All,
    Iíve been using a 500 ml jug to froth milk with my Via Venezia (with Breville ES800 steam wand). I only want to use a little milk for one latte and donít like wastage if I can avoid it, so I think I need to look at something smaller like a 300 ml jug. Iíd like to get more into the fun of coffee art.
    There seem to be a lot of options out there and much variation in price for what seems to be premiums for brand and aesthetics. Is there really that much difference between a $15 jug and a $50 jug if they have similar characteristics - shape, spout, etc? If so, can someone recommend a good brand.
    Thanks,
    Paul
    Paul. We used a big jug at home but we pour into a smaller jug for our milk coffee. It's easier for us to froth as the smaller jug is hard to control. We don't waste the milk though but instead add on fresh milk for the next latte or cap.

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    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sullyasari View Post
    Paul. We used a big jug at home but we pour into a smaller jug for our milk coffee. It's easier for us to froth as the smaller jug is hard to control. We don't waste the milk though but instead add on fresh milk for the next latte or cap.
    Do you mean you add it to fresh milk and texture it again? You shouldn't do that...

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    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    Do you mean you add it to fresh milk and texture it again? Or just top up and use it without steaming again?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    The cafelat jugs available in Beanbay are terrific - I use mine daily despite having some much more expensive jugs.
    +1 love these jugs
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    Purely personal choice. My view is you can get used to anything, but everyone will eventually prefer a certain shape. What works perfectly for one person won't be the same for another. If you can get down to a store a try a few that would be the bet way to choose.

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    i've been trying to find a jug (preferably black) with measurements on the inside so I can pour consistent amounts for a variety of cup sizes. I still havent been able to find one...

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    If stainless is okay and want measurements try these, I’ve got the 360ml and 600ml

    https://www.coffeeparts.com.au/brand...600ml-milk-jug
    Last edited by Mb21; 29th June 2018 at 08:29 PM. Reason: Typo

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    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
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    hard to beat the rhinowares jugs for the price and quality. you can pick up the whole set of three for just over $60.

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    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tammma View Post
    i've been trying to find a jug (preferably black) with measurements on the inside so I can pour consistent amounts for a variety of cup sizes. I still havent been able to find one...
    Decent Espresso have something like this I think.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tammma View Post
    i've been trying to find a jug (preferably black) with measurements on the inside so I can pour consistent amounts for a variety of cup sizes. I still havent been able to find one...
    I have far too many milk jugs. To an extent the machine and your technique will determine your preferences. I still think the multi hole wands are "a solution trying to find a problem". FWIW, for multi hole wands the Espro Toroidal is the only one I use voluntarily. All those mentioned below are for single hole wands.

    Spouts: See https://decentespresso.com/milk_jug - their "classic spout" and "competition spout" for the two main types.

    My personal picks are a

    1) 1 litre Chef Inox. In my view their only size that works well for both milk frothing and pouring - but it is brilliant.
    2) 600ml Cafelat and Incasa. Both are excellent, they work at the same level despite quite different styling.
    3) A few 300ml Avantis. Dirt cheap, froths and pours really well, as good as the unbranded 600. My main home jug as the size is perfect for my 200ml lattes.
    4) 400ml Incasa with a specially bent spout (to match my unbranded one). My only other 400 worth mentioning is an old one with a folded over lip. It came with a La Cimbali espresso machine from the 70's. It is completely unbranded - not even a country of manufacture. Both pour really well (the Incasa post modding).

    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Decent Espresso have something like this I think.
    Yep, Leroy is correct about the Decent being black.

    I have just received my 350 / 400ml "competition spout" (picked out simply because it looked identical to my Avanti) Decent milk jug last week. Quite thick stainless (more like a Motta in thickness than the cheapies) and almost exactly the same shape & lip as my Avanti 300ml (my preferred small jug). Really good matte black finish with subtle silver / grey "Decent" lettering and pale gold "milk Jug" on the outside. Inside is "raw brushed stainless" with black markings.The markings are "almost useful" in my case. Very poor light here means they are hard to see in this micro kitchen, adding any extra light and they are clear and detailed. The markings are really easy to see in any non-shaded setup. I wondered why they didn't just mark from (say) 80ml to 200ml at first, then I realised you can measure the milk's expansion accurately. Also useful.

    The Decent is worth a look if you like the cosmetics (I do, now I have seen it in the flesh), prefer markings and want a functional milk jug (essential for me). There is also a different spout option available for the same price - their "classic" is almost identical to my "with a La Cimbali small jug". Both of my older milk jugs pour well, although personally I prefer the Avanti pour to my unbranded 400 by a smidge.

    So how did the Decent perform? It froths well enough (equal to my usual jugs) and even pours as well as the Avanti (that is really, really rare for smaller milk jugs).

    I am quite happy with it. Whether it is worth the extra dollars for all CS'r's is debatable, however it also has the best finish (by far) of any of my milk jugs.


    Enjoy your cuppa.


    TampIt
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    TampIt, so you're saying the Espro jugs are best for 4 hole steam tips? I've just purchased a Profitec Pro 500 and am getting used to the 4 hoes. I've been looking for a new jug. I'm used to creating a directional whirlpool. The Espro requires a different technique.

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    I have a few jugs I like to pour with
    Possibly too many ��
    I got a set of ultra sharp jugs (350 and 600mls) for a bday present and I quite like them for piccolo, cups and some styles of art in mugs.
    My preferred jug for mugs though is my Ada Crew 3.0 jug. Actually not sure where it came from, showed up at word delivered to me. Score as it’s $160 and wouldn’t have paid for it myself.
    The barista pro gear (prob the cheapest on this list) and barista hustle jugs are good too.

    For latte art (not necessarily steaming milk, just pouring) the main thing to look for is the handle must be in line with the spout. Sounds odious but once you notice it’s hard not to see it. It can twist the milk as it’s pouring therefore pouring an uneven pattern.

    The spout shape is personal preference really and what you are used to. The pointer spouts for me give better more defined lines but are also less forgiving

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    I also have an incasa jug which I find the spout nice and is more forgiving as it’s a bit larger, but the handle is way out of alignment so doesn’t get much use. Would be different if it was aligned though

    As far as steaming goes, any bell shaped or tapered shape jug will work. It’s just getting your technique down

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyhakins View Post
    TampIt, so you're saying the Espro jugs are best for 4 hole steam tips? I've just purchased a Profitec Pro 500 and am getting used to the 4 hoes. I've been looking for a new jug. I'm used to creating a directional whirlpool. The Espro requires a different technique.
    G'day crazyhakins

    There are actually quite a few multi hole wand setups. Some are in a straight line "vertically" on the wand. They work in a similar fashion to the single hole wands. Others use 2, 3 or 4 holes at an angle (or even horizontally in some cases). They are the ones I call a solution chasing a problem. Personally, I cannot be bothered farting around with a system that at best creates an equal result (and that is highly debatable in itself, I do not feel they are equal). That raises two points:-
    1) You can tell any cafe I have set up - they use single hole wands (yep, Lineas & Stradas have a single hole wand option). Creating a whirlpool with a single hole wand is simplicity itself - result top quality microfoam after a short training stint. Just like I hope you have been doing with your older setup and hundreds of other correctly trained home / cafe users do every day.
    2) Using a multi hole wand and the Espro, you hold the wand in the centre and create a vertical toroidal shape (think doughnut). I reckon it is harder to do at first, however top quality foam is possible as long as you forgo the extra 1/2 teaspoon of sweetness per 100ml of milk* that a single hole wand generates. Even after five+ years my Sydney "4 hole guru" cannot manage that consistently.

    Enjoy your cuppa.


    TampIt

    Extra 1/2 teaspoon of sweetness per 100ml of milk*: Refer to Illy "Espresso - the science of quality", which is probably the only reference I tend to trust "until proven otherwise". Some of the facts do not account for some newer trends, however most of it is backed by a lot of data (YES!!!) rather than supposition / superstition / tradition. Note: the amount of extra sweetness figure is mine, based upon years of frothing milk on hundreds of different setups. Illy merely states that breaking down the lipids generates sweetness until the milk is scalded - which also implies that you need really good control to stop just short of the scalding point to maximise the extra sweetness. IMO that is where 4 hole wands in particular fail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    G'day crazyhakins

    There are actually quite a few multi hole wand setups. Some are in a straight line "vertically" on the wand. They work in a similar fashion to the single hole wands. Others use 2, 3 or 4 holes at an angle (or even horizontally in some cases). They are the ones I call a solution chasing a problem. Personally, I cannot be bothered farting around with a system that at best creates an equal result (and that is highly debatable in itself, I do not feel they are equal). That raises two points:-
    1) You can tell any cafe I have set up - they use single hole wands (yep, Lineas & Stradas have a single hole wand option). Creating a whirlpool with a single hole wand is simplicity itself - result top quality microfoam after a short training stint. Just like I hope you have been doing with your older setup and hundreds of other correctly trained home / cafe users do every day.
    2) Using a multi hole wand and the Espro, you hold the wand in the centre and create a vertical toroidal shape (think doughnut). I reckon it is harder to do at first, however top quality foam is possible as long as you forgo the extra 1/2 teaspoon of sweetness per 100ml of milk* that a single hole wand generates. Even after five+ years my Sydney "4 hole guru" cannot manage that consistently.

    Enjoy your cuppa.


    TampIt

    Extra 1/2 teaspoon of sweetness per 100ml of milk*: Refer to Illy "Espresso - the science of quality", which is probably the only reference I tend to trust "until proven otherwise". Some of the facts do not account for some newer trends, however most of it is backed by a lot of data (YES!!!) rather than supposition / superstition / tradition. Note: the amount of extra sweetness figure is mine, based upon years of frothing milk on hundreds of different setups. Illy merely states that breaking down the lipids generates sweetness until the milk is scalded - which also implies that you need really good control to stop just short of the scalding point to maximise the extra sweetness. IMO that is where 4 hole wands in particular fail.
    Thanks for the info! Cafe setups is where I began but havenít worked a commercial machine for years. I always remember them only having a single hole and love a good whirlpool, which may be partly why Iím getting used to the P509. The Espro video actually helped because I realised I needed to centre the wand tip more than I would with a single hole, even though Iím still going for the whirlpool. Tends to work quite well but is still a bit hit-and-miss. Maybe a new tip is in order.
    One jug that doesnít get much of a mention is the Tiamo 450ml or 360ml jug. I love the look of it but havenít had a play with it. Any experience?
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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    I still think the multi hole wands are "a solution trying to find a problem". FWIW, for multi hole wands the Espro Toroidal is the only one I use voluntarily.
    TampIt
    When you say it's a solution trying to find a problem, what do you mean? I'm trying to understand the reason why a 4 hole tip has been used in the first place if a 1 hole tip is widely used on commercial machines.
    I'm also struggling to understand, if the 4 hole tip is designed to be used with a jug like the toroid in the technique used in the video on their website, why the 4 hole tip is on an angled steam wand. Shouldn't be a straight wand that points straight down?

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyhakins View Post
    I've just purchased a Profitec Pro 500 and am getting used to the 4 hoes.
    Cant say anything like that came with my ECM. :?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    Cant say anything like that came with my ECM. :?
    Hahahahaha XD

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    Cant say anything like that came with my ECM. :?
    Haha, really?!? You need to speak to your dealer, it's amazing what they'll throw in these days.

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    Haha and by golly you're right, that would take getting used to! XD

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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyhakins View Post
    When you say it's a solution trying to find a problem, what do you mean? I'm trying to understand the reason why a 4 hole tip has been used in the first place if a 1 hole tip is widely used on commercial machines.
    I'm also struggling to understand, if the 4 hole tip is designed to be used with a jug like the toroid in the technique used in the video on their website, why the 4 hole tip is on an angled steam wand. Shouldn't be a straight wand that points straight down?
    I mean it is about as practical as using a robot with a thick foot to stop a draft coming through underneath a door (from Isaac Asimov, probably a little misquoted - it was a long time ago I read it). Single wands work well on any machine I have ever used, and I have never had better microfoam from a 4 hole wand (mostly, not even close to equal, let alone better). Given the smaller, extra holes must be more difficult to make I presume it would also be a little dearer to manufacture. Incomprehensible in my world, hence a solution trying to find a matching problem to solve.

    When the angled 4 hole wands first appeared, the theory was that you could hold the wand steadily in the middle of the jug and it would do "perfect microfoam faster" than the boring old single hole wand aimed straight down. I reckon anyone who tried to do microfoam in a standard milk jug by pointing it straight down should be shown the exit door pronto. Further, AFAIAC, speed of frothing is merely a function of power, temperature and flow rate of the steam - I cannot see why adding more holes / changing the angles etc. etc. would necessarily make it froth faster and seriously doubt whether their resulting foam is "perfect" - especially as it usually lacks the extra sweetness that most "baristas / gifted amateurs" can achieve after a little practice with a single wand setup. Whether someone also thought the training process is shortened / lengthened I have no idea.

    If you pointed 4 holes straight down (i.e. parallel steam streams) then you are back to a slightly more horizontal version of the standard whirlpool - presumably the designers were trying to avoid the "tilt" of a single wand setup? Some earlier wands also have 2, 3 or 4 holes in a vertical line where you are supposed to aim the steam at the side of a jug and and create a whirlpool (i.e. just like a single hole wand, however with more "depth" and less "width" to the steam flow). Who knows? I only know it did not dredge enough of the milk from the bottom of the jug up into the stream of steam to work properly. One bit of blurb "way back when" reckoned that was less likely to scald the milk as it had a differently shaped contact patch - also a bit debatable in theory and not supported in practice in my view.

    Using an angled 4 hole wand the Espro creates a vertical toroid instead of a horizontal(ish) whirlpool. If you think about it, steam glancing off the bottom of the bell shaped Espro gives you a similar angle to the steam glancing off the side of a single hole wand / standard jug.

    Of course, using a single wand pointing straight down "at the bell / central dome" in an Espro gives the same effect (perhaps a little more uniform as there is no variance in the pressure across the 360 degrees?). FWIW, using that technique froths as well as a standard jug - extra sweetness and all. Just a different approach. I rarely use my two sizes of Espro's these days as the Avanti et al listed above give me the exact size and performance I need and the skills translate to most standard commercial machines - the "Espro technique" only works with an Espro jug.

    Hope this answers your Qn fully.

    TampIt
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    Yeah in my experience one or two hole tips are the best on most machines. I currently have a 2-hole Profitec tip fitted to my EM6910 and its awesome, but I equally like single hole tips on this machine especially the style that is usually fitted to an EM4820 as it has a slightly smaller hole than the standard tip and gives a better result. Which brings up another point - I think the size of the hole makes as much difference as the number of holes. The few commercial machines Iíve used have mostly had 2-hole tips which seemed to work well. The one 4-hole tip Iíve come across was just way too hard to control.

    Back to milk jugs more specifically for anyone thatís interested Iíve been trying a Barista Hustle jug over the last few weeks. Itís a nice jug and is good quality for the price. Itís definitely nice and straight as claimed. After lots of experimentation Iíve decided to sell it as itís not quite as good a match with my current machine (the EM6910 mentioned above). So if you have a similar appliance level or smallish machine without heaps of steaming power itís possibly not going to work for you either. The jug was designed for professional baristas and tested on commercial equipment so I think this is where it would really come into its own. The milk stretches really easily, but without the power of a commercial or prosumer machine it doesnít texture and blend in as well as what I can manage with my other jugs. Donít think Iíll ever stump up $150+ for a Jibbijug so the next one Iíll try will probably be a Decent Espresso jug.
    crazyhakins likes this.

  47. #47
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    I mean it is about as practical as using a robot with a thick foot to stop a draft coming through underneath a door (from Isaac Asimov, probably a little misquoted - it was a long time ago I read it). Single wands work well on any machine I have ever used, and I have never had better microfoam from a 4 hole wand (mostly, not even close to equal, let alone better). Given the smaller, extra holes must be more difficult to make I presume it would also be a little dearer to manufacture. Incomprehensible in my world, hence a solution trying to find a matching problem to solve.

    When the angled 4 hole wands first appeared, the theory was that you could hold the wand steadily in the middle of the jug and it would do "perfect microfoam faster" than the boring old single hole wand aimed straight down. I reckon anyone who tried to do microfoam in a standard milk jug by pointing it straight down should be shown the exit door pronto. Further, AFAIAC, speed of frothing is merely a function of power, temperature and flow rate of the steam - I cannot see why adding more holes / changing the angles etc. etc. would necessarily make it froth faster and seriously doubt whether their resulting foam is "perfect" - especially as it usually lacks the extra sweetness that most "baristas / gifted amateurs" can achieve after a little practice with a single wand setup. Whether someone also thought the training process is shortened / lengthened I have no idea.

    If you pointed 4 holes straight down (i.e. parallel steam streams) then you are back to a slightly more horizontal version of the standard whirlpool - presumably the designers were trying to avoid the "tilt" of a single wand setup? Some earlier wands also have 2, 3 or 4 holes in a vertical line where you are supposed to aim the steam at the side of a jug and and create a whirlpool (i.e. just like a single hole wand, however with more "depth" and less "width" to the steam flow). Who knows? I only know it did not dredge enough of the milk from the bottom of the jug up into the stream of steam to work properly. One bit of blurb "way back when" reckoned that was less likely to scald the milk as it had a differently shaped contact patch - also a bit debatable in theory and not supported in practice in my view.

    Using an angled 4 hole wand the Espro creates a vertical toroid instead of a horizontal(ish) whirlpool. If you think about it, steam glancing off the bottom of the bell shaped Espro gives you a similar angle to the steam glancing off the side of a single hole wand / standard jug.

    Of course, using a single wand pointing straight down "at the bell / central dome" in an Espro gives the same effect (perhaps a little more uniform as there is no variance in the pressure across the 360 degrees?). FWIW, using that technique froths as well as a standard jug - extra sweetness and all. Just a different approach. I rarely use my two sizes of Espro's these days as the Avanti et al listed above give me the exact size and performance I need and the skills translate to most standard commercial machines - the "Espro technique" only works with an Espro jug.

    Hope this answers your Qn fully.

    TampIt
    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Yeah in my experience one or two hole tips are the best on most machines. I currently have a 2-hole Profitec tip fitted to my EM6910 and its awesome, but I equally like single hole tips on this machine especially the style that is usually fitted to an EM4820 as it has a slightly smaller hole than the standard tip and gives a better result. Which brings up another point - I think the size of the hole makes as much difference as the number of holes. The few commercial machines Iíve used have mostly had 2-hole tips which seemed to work well. The one 4-hole tip Iíve come across was just way too hard to control.

    Back to milk jugs more specifically for anyone thatís interested Iíve been trying a Barista Hustle jug over the last few weeks. Itís a nice jug and is good quality for the price. Itís definitely nice and straight as claimed. After lots of experimentation Iíve decided to sell it as itís not quite as good a match with my current machine (the EM6910 mentioned above). So if you have a similar appliance level or smallish machine without heaps of steaming power itís possibly not going to work for you either. The jug was designed for professional baristas and tested on commercial equipment so I think this is where it would really come into its own. The milk stretches really easily, but without the power of a commercial or prosumer machine it doesnít texture and blend in as well as what I can manage with my other jugs. Donít think Iíll ever stump up $150+ for a Jibbijug so the next one Iíll try will probably be a Decent Espresso jug.
    Ah that's very interesting fellas... perhaps the 4-hole was moreso for doing multiple drinks (larger volume of milk) at once?

    Have been considering getting a 2-hole tip for my Profitec Pro 500. I've gotten mostly used to the 4-hole, and pretty decent results, but yeah it can be hard to control at times, and it feels like there is something missing...

    It may be worth getting hmm...

  48. #48
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simonsk8r View Post
    Ah that's very interesting fellas... perhaps the 4-hole was moreso for doing multiple drinks (larger volume of milk) at once?

    Have been considering getting a 2-hole tip for my Profitec Pro 500. I've gotten mostly used to the 4-hole, and pretty decent results, but yeah it can be hard to control at times, and it feels like there is something missing...

    It may be worth getting hmm...
    Just do it Simon. I think youíll be pleased.
    simonsk8r likes this.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Just do it Simon. I think you’ll be pleased.
    I think I'll be getting one, if nothing else to see what the difference is. The espro just isn't my style of jug and I don't want to be forced into one just because my steam wand has 4 holes in it. Seems a bit silly.
    LeroyC likes this.

  50. #50
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Just do it Simon. I think youíll be pleased.
    Haha boom! Yeah I think I shall
    LeroyC likes this.

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