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Thread: Milk pitchers

  1. #1
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    Milk pitchers

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all,

    what milk pircher would tou reccomend for me, I make one coffee at a time for me, and me only, but sometimes make a hot chocolate for the wife or a bother coffee when entertaining.

    So, unsure to clean and refill the pitcher and steam for he second coffee or have a pitcher big enough to do 2 every now and then.

    I would ise it for myself everyday, and make a second one, maybe once a month. So rarely. The extra effort is not a bother of steaming and frothing twice.

    But deciding if a a larger pitcher is better or should I just get a smaller, or does it make no difference?

    also, brands/ shapes all suggestions welcome.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    get a smaller pitcher, one designed for a single milk-based coffee (approx 300mls). It will be easier to use for this purpose. You want to be able to fill the jug to about 1/3 capacity prior to steaming.
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  3. #3
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    What machine do you have and what type of coffee do you normally have? I also think a 300ml would be best for you, but may need to adjust technique or steam tip depending on machine.
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  4. #4
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    I have a Bezzera Mitica machine, and usually alternate between a long black or a cappuccino.

    Can you please ease explain further about technique or steam wand adjustments?

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    Aargh the americanisms! Ok now that Iíve got that off my chest

    Iíd recommend the Rhinoware Teflon jugs.

    Iíve got a small (350ml) and a large 600ml.

    The smaller jug gets the most daily use, making caps for the mrs. The larger one is used when we have guests, or for making hot chocs for the kids.

    The Teflon finish means that they rinse clean very easily. Recommended.
    sten186 likes this.

  6. #6
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    I would have a ~300 ml and a 600 ml jug for your needs. The ~300 would be for daily use.

    I would get a two hole steam tip to ensure you have enough time to properly texture the milk. It may take a little longer with the 600 ml jug, but you shouldn't notice too much of a difference. Besides, I wouldn't guess that you are in too much of a rushed situation at home. Frothing technique will vary slightly depending on the drink you are making, but overall should not change dramatically.

    As far as the brand goes, it is more just personal preference. Colour, coating, and shape (for the most part) don't play into creating texture. The one thing I would look for is a nice pointy spout, so you can make wanky latte art to impress your friends.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I made an effort (wanky latte art to impress my wife) a few years back, my results were reasonable, her reaction? very noice! doesn't seem to affect the quality of the coffee one way or the other, don't worry about it now.

    Guess you can put lipstick on a pig but at the end of the day it's still a pig.

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    I always say latte art is an indication of a nice shot and well textured milk. Free pour art tends to happen naturally when these two things come together. Etching is more of a lipstick for pig scenario.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosco View Post
    I always say latte art is an indication of a nice shot and well textured milk. Free pour art tends to happen naturally when these two things come together. Etching is more of a lipstick for pig scenario.
    This. Plus I take it as a general indication that a barista is committed to their craft - not an infallible sign, but there are plenty of places in Sydney for example doing the 'dump n run' for takeaways and they tend to be the ones where scant attention is paid to the quality of shot and milk (or for that matter milk hygiene/food handling practices or even delivering orders for skinny, soy etc. accurately if a 1L jug of dairy milk is available).
    bosco, simonsk8r and bigdaddy like this.

  10. #10
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    Threads like this always amuse me, perhaps I’m a bit jaded.
    What experience do these people have that give advice?
    And the most important question has not been asked.

    What size cup or mug do you use?

    Get a jug that is correct for the cup or mug. For 2 drinks every now and then, steam 2 lots of milk

  11. #11
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    And for those that think latte art can only be done with correctly steamed milk, I call rubbish.
    There are ways to save poorly steamed milk, over stretched anyway.

  12. #12
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    For the record: I have worked in the coffee industry for over 10 years. Mainly behind the machine, but also as a trainer. I have worked in cafes and restaurants, for large scale catering companies and owned a cafe. I wouldn't be able to even guess how many coffees I have made, but it is a fair few.

    I am happy to offer my advice, and that is all it is. If you know a better way, please let us all know. This is one of the things I enjoy about the coffee world. Everyone has an opinion.

    However, what I am really enjoying is how you are amused at everyone offering their novice advice, then you proceed to offer your own.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosco View Post
    For the record: I have worked in the coffee industry for over 10 years. Mainly behind the machine, but also as a trainer. I have worked in cafes and restaurants, for large scale catering companies and owned a cafe. I wouldn't be able to even guess how many coffees I have made, but it is a fair few.

    I am happy to offer my advice, and that is all it is. If you know a better way, please let us all know. This is one of the things I enjoy about the coffee world. Everyone has an opinion.

    However, what I am really enjoying is how you are amused at everyone offering their novice advice, then you proceed to offer your own.
    Sorry my post came across as negative, was not meant to.
    I was not having a dig at the opinions given here either, just making a point that there is no point getting a 300ml jug for a mug.

    For the record. I also have over 10 yrs exp in coffee and have been working in a top qld roastery as head barista, wholesale trainer ect (in the good coffee where section but not a site sponsor so wonít mention where, pm me if interested) Which means nothing cause as a wholesale trainer I need to deal with ĎIíve been doing it this way for 30 yearsí. Making coffee for 30 years does not mean making it well.

    And you can get latte art from average stretched milk, common misperception is that it must be a good shot and milk for art to happen. Itís just wrong. The shot is just the colour, Coffee is just a medium for art which is subjective

    But again these are all words that carry as much weight as the person reading them believes.
    Meant to be constructive comments, please read it that way
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  14. #14
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    My post came across as exactly what amuses me, the all knowing keyboard warrior

    Sorry for that
    greenman likes this.

  15. #15
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    Hi Sten,

    I used to use standard cappuccino cups and mugs when i ran out of my cups...I had two milk pitchers, a 300ml? and 600ml? pitcher...I had certain spots on the inside of the pitcher I'd aim to hit when filling with cold milk...My favorite was the 300ml pitcher which I'd aim to fill to just beneath the bottom of the beginning of the spout..I'd always make a cappuccino for her and I first thing in the morning and I did not have a lot of milk wastage...I'd use the 600ml ptcher when we had visitors...

    My point is...To answer your question I'd buy 2 and use the small one if you are making a drink for you and the larger one for visitors...When all said and done it doesn't really matter what size you use so long as you are happy with using it..What does matter is how much milk you put into the pitcher for the amount of drinks you are making....Consistent, correct amounts of milk into the pitcher help reduce wastage both home and commercially...A good suggestion is to buy pitchers with measuring marks on the inside and that can help you learn, accurately and consistently pour the correct amount of milk for your drink/s....

    Hope this helps...

    Cheers.
    sten186 likes this.



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