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Thread: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

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    Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi Guys

    Im interested in whether anyone here leverages a breadmaker to bake their own fresh bread?

    Im curious whether you can replicate the quality/texture/taste of your standard white loaf found at Brumbys/Bakers Delight.

    Im thinking about getting the wife a machine for Xmas :)

    Machines/recipes recommendations would be greatly appreciated :) I know nothing about bread - and can manage only a burnt camping damper.

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    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    I know nothing about what a loaf of bread from Brumbys tastes like but I can tell you that you can produce outstanding bread in a breadmaker. I have been doing so since they first came on the market decades ago. Theres few things in life as good as a loaf of piping hot bread fresh from the pan. Whether that pan be a traditional bread pan from the oven or the pan from a bread machine. The type and quality of the bread is limited only by your quality control/attention to detail (Mainly the water/liquid temp.), imagination, and ingredients.

    One word of caution. Fresh bread still warm from the oven is extremely addictive! ;D ;D ;D


    Java "BMers of the world unite!" phile

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Hi Matt,

    My family have been using the same bread maker for about 4 years and think the bread it makes tastes al least as good as fresh loaves from Brumbys and the like. For ease we use "Laucke" bread mix (can get it from supermarkets). Often I mix 50/50 white and wholemeal. Sometimes we make fruit loaf. Lots of recipes on the net and in the book that came with the machine. The machine is a basic model (Breville BBM100) and retails for $90 - $100. Bread works out considerably cheaper than bought stuff (forgotten how much - I did work it out once). You can put the ingredients in the machine the night before and set it up to be ready for breakfast the next morning if you like really fresh bread. Its a nice smell to start the day with, mixed with fresh coffee of course!!!

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 39273C353A3A3B3A540 link=1321835546/0#0 date=1321835546
    Im interested in whether anyone here leverages a breadmaker to bake their own fresh bread?
    are you kidding? I think Java must be lying... the only use for a breadmaker is roasting coffee isnt it? Im sure I saw a "free heat gun with bread-maker purchase" in woollies the other day :D

    OK seriously, I think you can liken it to coffee - franchise bakeries use pre-mix, which is a bit like supermarket beans. They have a small number of pre-mix bases which every loaf is made from. To get the different colours and shapes they just bake it differently.

    Find a bakery that makes it fresh using real things like flour, and youll probably find its quite popular. Friends of mine moved from a Brumbies franchise, to owning a local independant bakery using pre-mix, to making their own from scratch. It tastes better, if you ask me :)

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    I went through a stage of making my own bread a few years ago. I think dollar for dollar it was no cheaper than basic supermarket bread, but definitely more economical than Brumbys etc, especially for specialty loaves.

    The skys the limit for quality and variety, you get out what you put in. The process is reasonably foolproof and allows for improvements and creativity.

    Having said that, its obviously not as convenient as buying bread. Its enjoyable and satisfying, but you need to want to do it.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    I find the basic white loaf, made from scratch, good on the day but goes stale by the next day (if there is any left). It is great for a french or continental loaf with a hearty home made soup on a cold winters night. My fruit loaf is great, but again doesnt stay fresh for more than a couple of days. I have found that wholemeal and multigrain mixes from the supermarket keep better (havent bothered doing them from scratch)

    Also great for donuts, hot cross bun dough, pizza dough, Chelsea bun, Corn bread etc. there are a heap of other recipes in the book to try.

    And as an added bonus you can turn it into a coffee roaster if you dont like it as a bread maker (just dont give the Missus a heat gun for Valentines day) ;D ;D ;D

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Good point coffee mum - just about every bakery puts preservatives in their bread. There are a couple (cant remember the exact names) that make kids in general go a bit nuts. Up here in the tropics, the bakeries will add more during the build-up to try and stop the mould, so if you have kids that are sensitive to those things you stay away from the bread!

    If you like watching the flavours, colours, and preservatives, thats another bonus to making your own bread.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 303C353536360C3E263E530 link=1321835546/5#5 date=1321848146
    I find the basic white loaf, made from scratch, good on the day but goes stale by the next day (if there is any left).
    Gday Coffee Mum... :)

    A small amount of Ascorbic Acid helps a bit in this regard, its often called Bread Enhancer, Bread Conditioner (and probably other things too) but it is just plain Vitamin C and can usually be bought in powdered form, from Home Bakers Supplies.

    We have gone off baking the bread in the BM itself though, much prefer the better all around results from the oven, so just use the BM for mixing, kneading and proofing.

    Have also moved away from single whole loaves of bread too. Have found it much more convenient to bake suitably sized bread-rolls and then pop them in the freezer after theyve cooled. A quick nuke in the microwave when needed is all that is required to enjoy beautiful, freshly baked bread when ever you want it.... Mmmm. 8-) :)

    Mal.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Hi Mal,

    I do use bread improver, but still find a white loaf a bit dry next day, and as I said if there is any left (62" 19 year old usually sees to it that theres not ;D)

    We dont eat much white bread these days, preferring wholemeal & multigrain and they keep quite well, but I do love it as a dough maker for all the other goodies that I shouldnt eat either :D

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 4B524343260 link=1321835546/4#4 date=1321845777
    I think dollar for dollar it was no cheaper than basic supermarket bread, but definitely more economical than Brumbys etc, especially for specialty loaves.
    If youre buying pre-made mixes the bread will comparable to store bought loaves. If you make your breads from scratch and buy the ingredients in larger quantities I think youll find its cheaper than even the basic supermarket breads. The same thing goes for specialty breads.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4F474F484244260 link=1321835546/3#3 date=1321841797
    Find a bakery that makes it fresh using real things like flour, and youll probably find its quite popular. Friends of mine moved from a Brumbies franchise, to owning a local independant bakery using pre-mix, to making their own from scratch. It tastes better, if you ask me
    Far better tasting! :) :) :)

    Quote Originally Posted by 4B524343260 link=1321835546/4#4 date=1321845777
    Having said that, its obviously not as convenient as buying bread.
    If you are set up for it making a loaf is a breeze. You simply toss everything into the pan, hit a button, and come back in 2 hours and 40 minutes or so depending on your maker/loaf to hot and fresh bread. It takes me all of literally 2 or 3 minutes to make most breads, longer if youre doing a specialty one that requires the chopping of nuts or some such. If you have all the ingredients buried in the back of a cupboard or in containers that you cant get your measuring cups into then it will take longer. But with everything ready to hand and in containers that you can measure direct from a basic white loaf should only take a couple of minutes to get going.

    Quote Originally Posted by 454940404343794B534B260 link=1321835546/5#5 date=1321848146
    I find the basic white loaf, made from scratch, good on the day but goes stale by the next day
    Use bread flour or add gluten to the bread and it will last much longer. Bread flour (Called strong flour in the UK/Europe and perhaps in AUS as well.) will yield a loaf that is much softer, with a more elastic/less grainy feel, and has a longer shelf life. Also store the finished loaf, once its completely cooled down, in a ziplock or other plastic bag that you can seal/tie shut and do not put it in the fridge. Fresh bread will rarely last long enough for spoiling to be a worry.
    :) :) :)

    If you find a loaf to be dried out and stale the next day then you need to change the recipe youre using and/or the setting(s) on the BM.

    Making your own bread from scratch opens up a whole new world of reasonably priced wholesome breads with-out all the additives and preservatives found in virtually all store bought products. You can make a basic white loaf that will knock your socks off for taste as well as enjoying loaves such as an Onion & Rye bread or an Apple & Cheese bread or any of thousands of other recipes out there that will have your tastebuds crying out for more and make you wonder why youve been eating the cr@p from the store for all these years. Having a breadmachine makes it a breeze to do.
    :) :) :)


    Java "Hiding his BM from all the Roasters" phile

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    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    We use the bread-maker for making bread on a regular basis

    My favourite bread is olive bread

    We use both home blends & commercial preparations from the supermarket

    KK

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Thanks for all the useful info guys.

    A colleague mentioned that his standard $100 bread maker is LOUD... so loud that it wakes his 2 y/o kid up (whoms bedroom is near his kitchen). Hence he doesnt use the fresh morning bread feature thing too often.

    Is the agitator/kneading noise loud enough to wake baby etc?

    Panasonic have apparently just released some new model SD-2501. Is there much difference between the $250 machine and the $100 entry level machine?

    Is panasonic the brand to get here in Aus?* I notice on Amazon in the US, the brand to get looks to be Zojirushi which Ive never heard of.

    I prefer to spend a bit more and get a quality compliance that will last.

    cheers

    Matt.

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    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Id suggest buying one from a 2nd hand store. Its where Ive bought mine and I see them all the time looking new for $15 or $20. Most of the features you find on the high end units are bells and whistles that arent really needed and IMO arent worth the extra $100. My previous BM I got from a 2nd hand store for I think it was $10. It was a no name generic one and I used it pretty much every day for about 15 years before it finally died on me. I replaced it with another virtually new looking $15 unit from a 2nd hand store and it has seen regular use with-out a burp for a year and a half and is still running flawlessly. As with just about any piece of equipment the more bells and whistles and electronics a machine has the sooner it will break. The basic machines will run until something physically breaks while the fancier ones with all the electronic bells and whistles will blow a board/circuit and stop functioning long before they physically wear out.


    Java "Loves da bread!" phile

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    Senior Member sidewayss's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Im snobbish when it comes to bread texture.

    I use the the machine up to the stage when it "knocks " down the dough for its second rise. i take it out, roll out n stretch the dough, roll up n put into a bread baking tin. Let prove, then bake in normal oven.

    The texture is better this way.

    The South Australian Lauke bread mix is excellent, and has not failed so far.

    Their crusty bread mix is great for making cheese n bacon bread.

    Matt, get the breadmaker and get into bread making. You got nothing to lose.
    When you tire of it, you can always convert it into a coffee roaster.* :)

    Gary at G

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 69656C6C6F6F55677F670A0 link=1321835546/8#8 date=1321851563
    as I said if there is any left (62" 19 year old usually sees to it that theres not ;D)
    Yep, been there, done that.... ;D

    Our hungry hoards have flown the nest (for the time being anyway) :P

    Mal.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 113A2D3A2B3332373E5B0 link=1321835546/9#9 date=1321852093
    Bread flour (Called strong flour in the UK/Europe and perhaps in AUS as well.) will yield a loaf that is much softer, with a more elastic/less grainy feel, and has a longer shelf life. Also store the finished loaf, once its completely cooled down, in a ziplock or other plastic bag that you can seal/tie shut and do not put it in the fridge. Fresh bread will rarely last long enough for spoiling to be a worry.
    :) :) :)
    The terminology Ive seen most used in these parts Java is either "Bakers Flour" or "High Protein Flour". And youre right, makes a huge difference.... 8-)

    Mal.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 565E56515B5D3F0 link=1321835546/3#3 date=1321841797
    Quote Originally Posted by 39273C353A3A3B3A540 link=1321835546/0#0 date=1321835546
    Im interested in whether anyone here leverages a breadmaker to bake their own fresh bread?

    OK seriously, I think you can liken it to coffee - franchise bakeries use pre-mix, which is a bit like supermarket beans.* They have a small number of pre-mix bases which every loaf is made from.* *To get the different colours and shapes they just bake it differently.

    Not sure where you are getting your info from but no franchise bakeries (that I am aware of) use premixes for bread. And to be honest besides an artisan bakery your average Bakers Delight or Brumbies would still be a lot better for you and more wholesome than any super market bread. If you want nice fresh bread but dont want to invest in a bread maker which will more than likely end up collecting dust just buy some pizza dough from your local supermarket, divide it into 5-600 gram pieces, shape, cover and rest (proof) for around 90 minutes (on the tray or tin you will bake in your preheated oven) and bake for 30 minutes on 220 for a nice vienna style loaf or 70 minutes on around 180 for a great crusty loaf.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    We bake our own sourdough breads at home and they are definitely more satisfying and delicious than any store-bought ones ^^ I have a friend who uses the breadmaker to make sourdough breads. Through trial and error, managed to work out the right settings.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    If you plan around having the bread ready for when you need it, it works well.
    I normally set it up before going to bed so that is fresh for family breakfast and making lunch sandwiches.
    Im now using it to make the pizza dough for our home-made pizzas. Great product with reduced mess and elbow grease!

    Cheerss.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5B474A704B632F0 link=1321835546/16#16 date=1324102522
    Not sure where you are getting your info from but no franchise bakeries (that I am aware of) use premixes for bread
    Only one source. I worked with an engineer for about 7 years who left but was always back in the office for contract work. Her partner ran one of larger franchise outlets (cant remember which one). They recently bought a bakery, and I still see them quite a bit. Ive been in contact lots regarding advice about my wifes gluten intolerance. He (The baker) has directly told me a number of times they used pre-mix at the previous bakery AND their no-name local bakery (before they bought it). In fact, one day the pre-mix ran out and the bakers didnt know what to do. So he told them how to mix flour and yeast. Sad but true. Now, it may be dry pre-mix, they may still add ingredients, roll it, knead it, etc. Dont know exactly. I can ask them more if you wish.

    Happy to be challenged, but I wont be surprised (in my cynical way) if they have a few "bases" and chuck in a few seeds every now and then. :)

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 7C747C7B7177150 link=1321835546/19#19 date=1324303998
    Quote Originally Posted by 5B474A704B632F0 link=1321835546/16#16 date=1324102522
    Not sure where you are getting your info from but no franchise bakeries (that I am aware of) use premixes for bread
    Only one source.* I worked with an engineer for about 7 years who left but was always back in the office for contract work.* Her partner ran one of larger franchise outlets (cant remember which one).* They recently bought a bakery, and I still see them quite a bit.* Ive been in contact lots regarding advice about my wifes gluten intolerance.* He (The baker) has directly told me a number of times they used pre-mix at the previous bakery AND their no-name local bakery (before they bought it).* In fact, one day the pre-mix ran out and the bakers didnt know what to do.* So he told them how to mix flour and yeast.* Sad but true.* Now, it may be dry pre-mix, they may still add ingredients, roll it, knead it, etc.* Dont know exactly. I can ask them more if you wish.

    Happy to be challenged, but I wont be surprised (in my cynical way) if they have a few "bases" and chuck in a few seeds every now and then.* :)
    Not trying to challenge or start an [e]argument :) but I have been involved in senior positions at both Bakers Delight and Brumbies over my 20 years as a Baker/QA/R&D and can categorically tell you that neither of those chains use any bread premixes, although Brumbies do use some cake/muffin premixes (standard for any bakery). Both use scratch mixes for all of the bread lines, and the only thing even close to a premix would be the premixed(softened grains) that they use in their 12 grain, which still gets added to a scratch dough. Again, not trying to be smarmy or a smartalec, but just trying to add some clarity to the thread

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    Senior Member Bosco_Lever's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 6C707D477C54180 link=1321835546/20#20 date=1324437348
    Not trying to challenge or start an [e]argument Smiley but I have been involved in senior positions at both Bakers Delight and Brumbies over my 20 years as a Baker/QA/R&D and can categorically tell you that neither of those chains use any bread premixes, although Brumbies do use some cake/muffin premixes (standard for any bakery). Both use scratch mixes for all of the bread lines, and the only thing even close to a premix would be the premixed(softened grains) that they use in their 12 grain, which still gets added to a scratch dough. Again, not trying to be smarmy or a smartalec, but just trying to add some clarity to the thread
    Can you clarify something please. What is a scratch mix?
    Do they just use flour, water and yeast with nothing added?
    Is the flour just plain wheat flour with no additives?
    Is the flour sourced from a mill (eg Laucke), or is it supplied by Bakers Delight?
    I believe references about premixes, referred to flour with "bread improver" and other additives added. It is simple to buy such a mix and add water and yeast to it. The same applies to adding a fixed amount of bread improver to "x" amount of flour, water and yeast.
    Everyone has different tastes and preferences, but most will agree True sourdough bread is the tastiest.
    Thanks in advance for your reply. :)

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 6067727D70130 link=1321835546/21#21 date=1324438903
    Can you clarify something please. What is a scratch mix?
    Do they just use flour, water and yeast with nothing added?
    Is the flour just plain wheat flour with no additives?
    Is the flour sourced from a mill (eg Laucke), or is it supplied by Bakers Delight?
    I believe references about premixes, referred to flour with "bread improver" and other additives added. It is simple to buy such a mix and add water and yeast to it. The same applies to adding a fixed amount of bread improver to "x" amount of flour, water and yeast.
    Everyone has different tastes and preferences, but most will agree True sourdough bread is the tastiest.
    Thanks in advance for your reply. :)
    Yes a scratch mix would be flour, water, salt, improver, gluten (in wholemeal only) yeast and oil.

    The flour would be just your standard strong bakers flour(13% protein) and keeping in mind that the addition of thiamine to bread flour (at 6.4 mg/kg) was made mandatory in Australia on 1 January 1991, each of the mentioned brands have an approved supplier be it Allied, Westons, Manildra and so on that they would purchase all of thier flour from.

    Not entirely sure I understand your next question, but you can buy bread premixes from your local supermarket, there are also obviously commercial bread premixes available that many small-medium bakeries would use. These premixes would have salt/improver/gluten already mixed in, some would also contain flavours/colours/preservatives and so on.

    I would definitely agree that I personally prefer rye and sourdough breads, but dont make the assumtion that just because your local bakery makes a sourdough that it is not a premix. The key ingredient in a good sourdough is the culture/sour which is a labour/time intensive process which often makes it prohibitive to use these days* :(



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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 667A774D765E120 link=1321835546/20#20 date=1324437348
    Not trying to challenge or start an [e]argument :)
    Ok, Im gladly corrected! Must have been a case of Chinese whispers or misunderstanding or something. Ill ask more next time Im around a baker!

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    Senior Member dski's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 0F110A030C0C0D0C620 link=1321835546/0#0 date=1321835546
    Hi Guys
    Im curious whether you can replicate the quality/texture/taste of your standard white loaf found at Brumbys/Bakers Delight.

    Im thinking about getting the wife a machine for Xmas :)

    Machines/recipes recommendations would be greatly appreciated :)
    How did xmas work out for the breadmaker!?

    I make all our bread from scratch including full sourdough and yeast breads. I have used breadmakers before, and they do make clean up easier. I find the results achieved without one better, and you can make bigger batches.

    I kind of like baking, but I can imagine many would just think it a pain.

    Try this ciabatta recipe, results are surprisingly good, and you dont need (knead!) anything special. I pull this out when in other peoples kitchens. I cant post links yet but on youtube look up: No knead Ciabatta by Yellowsaffron

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Wow, there are some bread experts here.
    I brought a bread maker & the special pre-mix from the Supermarket. The whole just add water bit & disaster.
    I made rock bread, it did not rise or cook properly!!
    I am going to dust off the old bread maker & try some of the recommendations on this page & see if I can make bread that is actually edible.

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    I make all the bread we eat (4 loaves / fortnight) by hand. I cant stand the prefab rubbish. Bread makers are Convenient but unsatisfying. To me anyway. I use two big bowls, two hands, four bread tins and our standard kitchen oven. I like putting seeds, coconut and the like in / on top.

    I was interstate for work earlier this week and we almost ran out so bought some prefab. Lets say its not going to happen again.

    Like coffee bread is a staple of my diet. Oh and I in identally posted a picture of a loaf I madE the other day in this forum in the camera discussion thread.

    Phil

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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    We use ours to make bread as well as using them to make dough. The breads are for general use as well as some as breakfast breads with nuts, fruit, and chocolate bits. Delicious with coffee. Lately I have been using the dough to make pizza... amazing, delicious, pizza! Some of the breads get cooked in the oven as french Bread, and the pizza gets cooked on a stone. We also mill our own wheat with a small, home high-speed impact mill. I would recommend one of the newer Zojurushi machines. We have been using two of the older, vertical models for years. We got them used at thrift stores.

    In regards to commercial breads, a glance at the ingredients should be sufficient to make you search elsewhere for the staff of life. And fresh bread, right from the oven, fills the house with the aroma of "home," and tastes of renewal and hope.

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    Senior Member dski's Avatar
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    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Quote Originally Posted by 746C6D6877676C68040 link=1321835546/26#26 date=1325988404
    Like coffee bread is a staple of my diet.
    Yeah, same here!

    Quote Originally Posted by 746C6D6877676C68040 link=1321835546/26#26 date=1325988404
    I make all the bread we eat (4 loaves / fortnight) by hand. I cant stand the prefab rubbish. Bread makers are Convenient but unsatisfying. To me anyway. I use two big bowls, two hands, four bread tins and our standard kitchen oven. I like putting seeds, coconut and the like in / on top.
    I agree. I make a few large loaves at a time, slice most of them, and keep in thee freezer - mostly we use it for breakfast toast.

    Quote Originally Posted by 56656A607D5B432A040 link=1321835546/27#27 date=1325994179
    In regards to commercial breads, a glance at the ingredients should be sufficient to make you search elsewhere for the staff of life.* And fresh bread, right from the oven, fills the house with the aroma of "home," and tastes of renewal and hope.
    Absolutely! I was a bit horrified when I found that it takes only about 4 minutes to make a loaf of supermarket bread.

    Here is the recipe that I couldnt post earlier. Its a handy one to have up your sleeve, and needs no equipment.

    http://youtu.be/3GjtXd0S6ps


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    Location
    Belgrave
    Posts
    41

    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Just my encouragement to buy a bread maker and also in support of the Laucke flour mill. We buy their 10KG bulk wholegrain mixture which comes with yeast in a recyclable bag. Following their recipe with the flour has not failed, even though I tend to mix it up with a bit of spelt flour and that is what I find the real benefit, you just can blend and tinker to make different loaves, like blending coffee beans I guess :)

    Our bells and whistle machine (Breville BB420) allows the fruit and nuts to be added in a small container in the lid that opens automatically later in the cycle and can be programmed for a delayed start, which is great to have fresh hot bread ready in the morning.

    Have just reconditioned it with a new seal and brass bush in the bread pan so it should be good to make another 4 loaves a week for the next 5 years.

    Cheers, Ernie

  31. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Nambour
    Posts
    84

    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Another vote for breadmakers. Mines a Breville BB400. Forgotten how old it is, but I reckon at least a decade. As for Lauke: I love their product, but find I need to vary the recipes to get best results - possibly because I live over 1000 metres above sea level. My starting point is the mix by hand volumes, but I often reduce the water by 15mls and the yeast by a quarter of a teaspoon.

    Best wishes, Russell

  32. #32
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    23

    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Hi All,

    Does anyone have the manual for the Breville BB405c? Or even the 400? Im after a scanned copy of it as mine has been lost.

    :(

  33. #33
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Nambour
    Posts
    84

    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Hi Amelie: Today I took delivery of a new Breville breadmaker (BBM800). This means I can post you my old BB400 manual if you would like it. PM your details if you want it.

    Best wishes, Russell.

  34. #34
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    2

    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Breadmakers are awesome!

  35. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    118

    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Breadmakers do make good loaves, but if you are after white fairy floss in a crusty shell, you wont get that with homemade bread.

    I owned a Panasonic for a while because my partner loved bread and ate too much of it. We even used one of those bread slicing guides and special bread makers flour but the bread was always somewhat heavier and more moist than bakery bread (think Burgen loaves) and difficult to slice.

    I eat so little bread that Im happy to buy it. But if you get one and it doesnt get used youll have a coretto roaster... ;)



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