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Thread: Repurposing your old percolator

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    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Repurposing your old percolator

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Looking for a use if that old percolator sitting around collecting dust? Use it to cook rice to reduce its' arsenic level.

    Who, What, Why: Is it safer to cook rice in a coffee percolator to avoid arsenic? - BBC News

    PLOS ONE: Rethinking Rice Preparation for Highly Efficient Removal of Inorganic Arsenic Using Percolating Cooking Water


    Java "Perk what?" phile
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    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Two links to the same article! Someone's a little stressed! Of course you can remove a certain amount of undesirables from rice if you follow instructions on the bag to rinse it for the prescribed period of time. This is mostly to remove excess starch, but a good rinse will help remove some toxins as well.

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    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Two links to the same article! Someone's a little stressed!
    Uuuummmm.....No. The first link is to a non-scientific news report on the topic for those who are just interested in a brief summary. The 2nd link is to the actual research paper for those who want a more in depth look at the details of the scientific basis behind the claim/statement.


    Java "A brief news story != a scientific research paper" phile
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    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Ah yes, it's working now. For some reason both links were taking me to the first article last night. Probably a Tapatalk problem rather than a CS issue. Good old Tapatalk.

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    "Rice is by far our dominant source of inorganic arsenic,"

    Wow, the things you learn on CoffeeSnobs.
    I've always thought of rice as fairly inert, safe and clean.

    I would guess that any "rice cooker" that used steam instead of just boiling the rice in water would be good too.

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    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    I would guess that any "rice cooker" that used steam instead of just boiling the rice in water would be good too.
    Yup! Steaming is a good way to do it also. Using a high volume water bath that gets thrown out is apparently the best way. So far anyways.


    Java "Gotta love learning!" phile
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    Is it only me that noticed they were using a dripolator, not a percolator?

    A percolator (yes I still have an old National / Panasonic) keeps recycling the water through the (metal) basket continuously, whereas a dripolator is a "one shot flowing process" usually through a paper filter (hence the "pourover" nickname). IF that experiment had been done with a percolator you could have left it until the rice was cooked. Mind you, recycling the water would possibly not remove as much arsenic.

    Interesting article Java"as usual"phile.

    TampIt



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