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Thread: My Breville bread toaster is great but getting the crumbs out is a real nuisance

  1. #1
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    My Breville bread toaster is great but getting the crumbs out is a real nuisance

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I don’t know if it’s because I haven’t properly mastered the dark art of emptying a toaster of the crumbs. My Breville toaster is a 4 slice “Lift and Look” model. It has this crumb tray at the bottom but when I slide it out I invariably see crumbs falling out the bottom as they get caught on something while the slider is being pulled out.

    I’ve tried holding the toaster upside down, to get the crumbs out that way, but it doesn’t get them all out. Should I look at other brands of toasters, like maybe a Russell Hobbs?

    I’ve also got this Breville electric kettle, which I bought when my then 10 year old Russell Hobbs electric kettle needed replacing. I made the mistake of rushing to the shopping center at the last minute, so I had to rush to make a choice. The Breville electric kettle works fine but the lid isn’t made of that black material that the lid of my old Russell Hobbs kettle was made of. Rather, it’s the same metal as the rest of the electric kettle, but with a clear window on the top. The result being I’ve occasionally almost burnt my finger when I’ve touched the lid as it gets hot in the same way the rest of the kettle does (it’s got this button on the handle that opens the lid). I didn’t have that problem with the lid on my old Russell Hobbs kettle.

    I don’t know what to make of Breville. Their products seem well made and long lasting but I’ve wound up finding some albeit small fault with the items I’ve bought.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    You have to empty the toaster over the sink. It's a terrible life with these first world problems
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    I have a small baking tray that the toaster lives in. No matter if it's in the cupboard or on the bench, all the crumbs can only get into the tray, not everywhere else.
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    Senior Member speleomike's Avatar
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    Hi

    I want a toaster made of high temperature glass or quartz like material so I can actually SEE both sides of the toast and so I can eject the toast when I want to.
    The crumbs should go into a decent tray. On my current crappy toaster that tray is about 2mm deep.
    Is there a political party that has a policy that it will fund the CSIRO to design us a better toaster?

    Mike
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  5. #5
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    There are glass sided toasters out there, the Magimix Vision is only $300
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    That crumb tray on a hinge is so much better than my slide out crumb tray it’s not funny. Does any company make a toaster with a crumb tray like that now?
    Last edited by pamount; 7th May 2019 at 12:05 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Had one of these many years ago Rocky, great toaster.

    Now have a modern Morphy Richards thing, its a piece of crap.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Awesome toaster. That guy does great job of explaining the mechanics of how it works too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pamount View Post
    works fine but the lid isn’t made of that black material that the lid of my old Russell Hobbs kettle was made of. Rather, it’s the same metal as the rest of the electric kettle, but with a clear window on the top. The result being I’ve occasionally almost burnt my finger when I’ve touched the lid as it gets hot in the same way the rest of the kettle does (it’s got this button on the handle that opens the lid). I didn’t have that problem with the lid on my old Russell Hobbs kettle.

    I don’t know what to make of Breville. Their products seem well made and long lasting but I’ve wound up finding some albeit small fault with the items I’ve bought.
    Pamount, don't worry about the burnt finger problem, that will be solved by a process called operant conditioning.

  11. #11
    Senior Member speleomike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Yes! I want one. Using the expansion and contraction of the nichrome wire to raise and lower the toast is sheer brilliance. It was probably a single engineer that came up with that idea. The Magimix Vision is nice but does not have such engineering brilliance lurking unseen beneath its cover.

    Thanks Rocky for finding that video. I have now also bookmarked http://www.automaticbeyondbelief.org :-)
    Mike
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  12. #12
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    We were given one of those Sunbeam toasters after we had a house fire with when I was a kid. I thought it was an old piece of junk that our neighbour wanted to get rid of, but I appreciated the design of it at the time, as much as a kid could. I have spent every time using a toaster since wishing it was more like that one. If I ever see one again I'll probably buy it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Would a 110v one work here with just a diode to drop the voltage? Or a pwm set at 50% and a SSR?
    There is a couple on eBay ex USA.

    I will keep my eyes out for one also. Awesome engineering!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Interesting! the Sunbeam model being discussed was common in Australia during the late 50's and through the 60/70's, must be heaps of them around in SH shops etc.

  15. #15
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    I just found one on Gumtree, advertised at $160. Having second thoughts about buying the next one I see.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    As good as they were in their day I would be very cautious about buying one second hand and expecting it to perform as new, I suspect repairs and parts would be a problem as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    Would a 110v one work here with just a diode to drop the voltage?
    Ummm, I'm not sure how your diode is going to drop voltage, me thinks you shouldn't be fiddling with live voltage Jackster, you might let the smoke out.


    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    must be heaps of them around in SH shops etc
    Most of our local second hand shops won't take electrical items due to OH&S and liability reasons so all that good stuff goes into landfill now.
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  18. #18
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Most of our local second hand shops won't take electrical items due to OH&S and liability reasons so all that good stuff goes into landfill now.
    Ah yes, the age we live in, as I said in my previous post to this thread, I'd be pretty cautious about buying a 50 year old electrical appliance.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Ummm, I'm not sure how your diode is going to drop voltage, me thinks you shouldn't be fiddling with live voltage Jackster, you might let the smoke out.
    Ah yes, sorry
    Only a theoretical question. Not something I would seriously consider doing.

    Being so well engineered, it probably only need the elements configuration changing in order to convert to 240v.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Ummm, I'm not sure how your diode is going to drop voltage
    The diode is a half wave rectifier so it turns the sinusoidal 230V RMS input into a very ugly 115V RMS out (ignoring diode loss). Since the thermal lag of the wire is evidently a second or more, it will act as a very nice RMS converter* and ignore the ugliness.




    *Equivalent heating power is the very definition of RMS. True fact: back when computing power was expensive, HP made a true RMS voltmeter that worked by using the input to heat a lump of metal, using a DC voltage to heat an identical lump of metal to the same temperature and measuring the DC voltage.

    Edit: It was the HP3400A. The more recent HP 3403C and Fluke 8920A use the same pronciple.

    Last edited by Lyrebird; 9th May 2019 at 11:01 AM.
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  21. #21
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    I’ve just been told the real solution to my problem with my toaster is to buy better quality bread. I was told the better quality breads don’t break apart into larger pieces in the toaster and only produce smaller finer crumbs, that the crumb tray will cope easier with.

    I’ve been buying the cheaper store brand of bread, like at Woolworths and Coles. So, if I buy other brands of bread, like Tip Top (for example), will my problem go away?
    Last edited by pamount; 9th May 2019 at 10:06 AM.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    The better the bread the better the toast. Panini bread makes great toast. If you want to go down the sliced bread route, I find Lawsons the best if you can get it in your area. You'll get better results if your bread isn't fresh, stale is best. Whether this will help with your crumb problem is a moot point.

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    After a bad run with toasters (electrical faults mostly), which the shop had the nerve to suggest it was because we hadn't emptied the crumbs out... we never bought another one and have been using a sandwich press we had anyway. If you buy real bread from a sourdough bakery, it's the best way to toast it. No burning, no collected crumbs, heats the toast up as well as toasts its... just won't play nice with that supermarket fluff without you putting a teaspoon in as a spacer. I hate toasters.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Dads plaited up bit of fencing wire, with hand formed trident at the bread end, combined with the red embers from a open fire produces the best toast.
    Fresh bread so it's still soft and moist on the inside, and a thin toasted layer on the outside. Takes about 10sec to toast each side. Then topped with butter and Mums homemade apricot jam (with the kernals in). Goodbye to a whole loaf of bread right there...
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  25. #25
    OCD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    The diode is a half wave rectifier so it turns the sinusoidal 230V RMS input into a very ugly 115V RMS out (ignoring diode loss). Since the thermal lag of the wire is evidently a second or more, it will act as a very nice RMS converter* and ignore the ugliness.




    *Equivalent heating power is the very definition of RMS. True fact: back when computing power was expensive, HP made a true RMS voltmeter that worked by using the input to heat a lump of metal, using a DC voltage to heat an identical lump of metal to the same temperature and measuring the DC voltage.

    Edit: It was the HP3400A. The more recent HP 3403C and Fluke 8920A use the same pronciple.

    That's easy for you to say.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    Dads plaited up bit of fencing wire, with hand formed trident at the bread end, combined with the red embers from a open fire produces the best toast.
    Fresh bread so it's still soft and moist on the inside, and a thin toasted layer on the outside. Takes about 10sec to toast each side. Then topped with butter and Mums homemade apricot jam (with the kernals in). Goodbye to a whole loaf of bread right there...
    The closest your going to get to that type of toast is with a Dualit, they never go wrong - pre Chinese toaster, simple robust quality.
    We have two the new bought one is now twenty years old, never missed a beat.
    The really old model I got second hand off eBay and lives in an off road camper that regularly shakes my fillings out, also never missed a beat.
    It's "CoffeeSnobs" quality toast.
    (Really jealous of your mums apricot jam though).
    OCD likes this.

  27. #27
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    The diode is a half wave rectifier so it turns the sinusoidal 230V RMS input into a very ugly 115V RMS out (ignoring diode loss). Since the thermal lag of the wire is evidently a second or more, it will act as a very nice RMS converter* and ignore the ugliness.




    *Equivalent heating power is the very definition of RMS. True fact: back when computing power was expensive, HP made a true RMS voltmeter that worked by using the input to heat a lump of metal, using a DC voltage to heat an identical lump of metal to the same temperature and measuring the DC voltage.

    Edit: It was the HP3400A. The more recent HP 3403C and Fluke 8920A use the same pronciple.

    Yes, I read about this. Apparently....
    Originally power was delivered as dc. When it was decided to change to ac, the voltage was selected to give the same heating power as the DC it was replacing. So it's 240v RMS, but that is 270(ish)v peak.

  28. #28
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    240v RMS, but that is 270(ish)v peak.
    The multiple is SQRT2 for sinewave supply, so 240V RMS is ~340V Peak.
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  29. #29
    Senior Member noidle22's Avatar
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    I saw an old Sunbeam auto toaster for repair a few months ago. Cool design.

    This particular toaster had one failed element. There is nobody selling replacement elements and the element ends are crimped/tack welded (one of the two, wasn't quite sure from looking at it) onto the power rails. Outside of custom winding a new element and then somehow securely affixing it to the power rail, there was nothing I could do. From a commercial standpoint I couldn't justify spending more time on it, I hope one day someone can spend the time on it and work out a way to replace that element.

    The only toaster I recommend people to buy are the Dualit range. They're expensive in comparison to your chain store brands but last forever and parts are readily available in Australia and overseas.
    The Sunbeam Cafe Series toaster also has replaceable elements but for a few months now there has been no stock of new elements. Unsure whether they will even be restocked, probably not.

  30. #30
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    Dads plaited up bit of fencing wire, with hand formed trident at the bread end, combined with the red embers from a open fire produces the best toast.
    Fresh bread so it's still soft and moist on the inside, and a thin toasted layer on the outside. Takes about 10sec to toast each side. Then topped with butter and Mums homemade apricot jam (with the kernals in). Goodbye to a whole loaf of bread right there...
    Spot on Jackster, doesn't come any better, we do similar during the winter months with a toasting fork when the combustion heater has burned to a nice bed of embers, as you say, slathered with butter and jam/topping of your choice.

    Needless to say we also have a toasting fork we carry in the motor home, for use when camping.

    Not my pic, stole it from Google.
    toast.jpg



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