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  1. #1
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Exclamation Amazon

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    The other side of the coin is that its now possible to order many items from Amazon U.S., prices are good, quality very good, shipping is prompt and delivery unbelievably fast.

    We have ordered and received a number of smaller, lower priced objects over the past week or so, all have shipped within hours of placing the order and have arrived on our doorstep within a few short days of ordering, they beat most Australian suppliers on a break when it comes to shipping and delivery.

    Which brings me to tracking, they certainly have that nailed as well, as the following cut and paste shows.

    Asked the driver if he was seeing much coming through from Amazon, US, told me he was being deluged with packages.

    Result Summary

    Waybill:0000000000 Delivered - Signed for by Friday, September 20, 2019 at 17:15 Origin Service Area: COLUMBUS - WEST, OH - ETNA - USA Destination Service Area: ADELAIDE - NORTH YELTA - AUSTRALIA 1 Piece
    Friday, September 20, 2019 Location Time Piece
    14 Delivered - Signed for by NORTH YELTA 17:15 1 Piece
    Thursday, September 19, 2019 Location Time Piece
    13 Delivery arranged no details expected ADELAIDE - AUSTRALIA 06:50 1 Piece
    12 Arrived at Sort Facility ADELAIDE - AUSTRALIA ADELAIDE - AUSTRALIA 06:37 1 Piece
    11 Departed Facility in SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA 05:43 1 Piece
    10 Processed at SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA 05:42 1 Piece
    Wednesday, September 18, 2019 Location Time Piece
    9 Clearance processing complete at SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA 23:03 1 Piece
    8 Arrived at Sort Facility SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA 22:25 1 Piece
    7 Customs status updated SYDNEY - AUSTRALIA 13:42
    Tuesday, September 17, 2019 Location Time Piece
    6 Departed Facility in CINCINNATI HUB - USA CINCINNATI HUB, OH - USA 05:31 1 Piece
    5 Processed at CINCINNATI HUB - USA CINCINNATI HUB, OH - USA 02:52 1 Piece
    4 Arrived at Sort Facility CINCINNATI HUB - USA CINCINNATI HUB, OH - USA 01:53 1 Piece
    Monday, September 16, 2019 Location Time Piece
    3 Departed Facility in COLUMBUS - WEST - USA COLUMBUS - WEST, OH - USA 22:48 1 Piece
    2 Processed at COLUMBUS - WEST - USA COLUMBUS - WEST, OH - USA 22:47 1 Piece
    1 Shipment picked up COLUMBUS - WEST, OH - USA 20:00 1 Piece

  2. #2
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    The other side of the coin is that its now possible to order many items from Amazon U.S., prices are good, quality very good, shipping is prompt and delivery unbelievably fast.
    If you join up to Amazon Prime for $59/yr you also get -

    FREE Two-day domestic delivery
    FREE Standard International Delivery on eligible orders over $49
    Prime Video
    Prime Music
    Prime Reading
    Twitch Prime

    The Amazon Prime Video streaming service (free with membership) has a few decent things on it. The free domestic shipping comes in useful too.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeLotta View Post
    If you join up to Amazon Prime for $59/yr you also get -

    FREE Two-day domestic delivery
    FREE Standard International Delivery on eligible orders over $49
    Prime Video
    Prime Music
    Prime Reading
    Twitch Prime

    The Amazon Prime Video streaming service (free with membership) has a few decent things on it. The free domestic shipping comes in useful too.
    Yep! the better half was onto that quick smart.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeLotta View Post

    The Amazon Prime Video streaming service (free with membership) has a few decent things on it.
    The Expanse
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    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Amazon are assholes. Instead of cooling the warehouses, they just order a standby stream of ambulances to take the order pickers to hospital as they drop from exhaustion and heat stress.
    I don't know why these huge money making companies can't give their workers a fair days pay and reasonable conditions.
    There was a podcast about them, called brownbox, by radiolab. Certainly an insight into the way they treat workers

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    338
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    Amazon are assholes. Instead of cooling the warehouses, they just order a standby stream of ambulances to take the order pickers to hospital as they drop from exhaustion and heat stress.
    I don't know why these huge money making companies can't give their workers a fair days pay and reasonable conditions.
    There was a podcast about them, called brownbox, by radiolab. Certainly an insight into the way they treat workers
    Jackster you couldn't be more right. As well as pickers also drivers etc. Multiple stories in multiple countries about, poor form by one of the richest people in the world. It isn't worth saving a dollar if the cost is so high for those who do. I wouldn't do business with them at any price.

    They are also prepared to shaft their vendors. They regularly do 'authenticity tests' where the vendor has to supply copies of invoices showing where they purchased from, how much, etc. Not that long later after they know your sales on their platform they go direct guaranteeing to purchase your sales volume as a minimum and cut you out.

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    Amazon are assholes. Instead of cooling the warehouses, they just order a standby stream of ambulances to take the order pickers to hospital as they drop from exhaustion and heat stress.
    Yeh, I think you might find that they do actually have air con at their Pennsylvania fulfillment centre now (after the bad press in 2011). I'm not aware of any claim that the same thing happened here. It's probably advisable to cite a source if you're going to sledge these mongrels with specific allegations. They just rip their staff and suppliers in a bunch of other ways.

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    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Top two results to a Google search for "Amazon workers Australia"

    "What it's like to work in an Amazon Australia warehouse"
    https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-...08?pfmredir=sm

    One day we were picking so fast, they made us give ourselves a round of applause," Amazonian 1 says. "Then they made us all go home early, and we didn't get paid for our whole shift."

    ...

    Heather Ikin, chair of Australia's College of Organisational Psychologists, says Amazon does not appear to be taking any responsibility for the "culture of fear" it has cultivated.
    "In Amazon's 'hellscape', workers face insecurity and crushing targets"
    https://amp.smh.com.au/business/work...07-p502ao.html

  9. #9
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeLotta View Post
    If you join up to Amazon Prime for $59/yr you also get -

    FREE Two-day domestic delivery
    FREE Standard International Delivery on eligible orders over $49
    Prime Video
    Prime Music
    Prime Reading
    Twitch Prime

    The Amazon Prime Video streaming service (free with membership) has a few decent things on it. The free domestic shipping comes in useful too.
    Just bought a $39 electronic thing from Amazon Au. Not eligible for prime, so $13 postage. One-third the unit cost.

    At least we get to watch The Grand Tour.

  10. #10
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    Hmmm...In the USA some Amazon prime members get free same day delivery....

    I am an Amazon prime member and bought my matchbox-size gadget 3 days ago on Sept 21.

    But I have yet to get confirmation it has left the warehouse... and it won't arrive until October 2 to Oct 15.

    We are poor cousins in the retail world.

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    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    This morning I get the much-awaited confirmation that my gadget has been shipped. And, surprise surprise....being shipped by China Post.

    So the company, posing as an Australian company on Amazon, is sending me stuff from China and the ETA now is October 15, a full 24 days after I put in the order.

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    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Yeah, I've experienced that too Robusto and in the end, the product was total rubbish...
    Besides that, you can often find better deals, all round, by doing a bit of research and then buy local. Might pay a little more but at least one is dealing with an actual Oz business...

    Mal.
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    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    Haha, Mal, you are so right.

    I've jockingly said there are 3 things the Chinese must do if they want to indeed conquer the world:
    Longer power cords, shorter shoelaces, and better quality control.

    The irony is I am buying a Chinese volt/amps meter to replace the one which stopped working after two weeks of use.
    You would think once bitten....twice shy.

    If I was paid for my time researching it, then several thousand dollars have been invested already!! And all for a $39 gadget.
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    338
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    Mal couldn't agree with you more!

    We all live in a global environment these days, far more than ever before. The reality is when we choose to purchase outside Australia, either for convenience or cost saving, a greater percentage of your spend leaves Australia. That is money which won't get spent in your or your employers business, wont pay tax to support a pension, wont spend money in businesses your super owns, etc. The USA already has the biggest economy in the world, China the second, no pressing need for us to add to their economies of scale and weaken our own economy.
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    OCD
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    Quote Originally Posted by 338 View Post
    ...We all live in a global environment these days...
    ...no pressing need for us to add to their economies of scale and weaken our own economy...
    If we don't buy from them, they won't buy from us.
    Quid pro quo.

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    338
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    OCD, they don't already. There are large technological platforms like Amazon, Ebay and Alibaba which are changing the face of trade more the older larger volume trade. These work better getting their product into us than ours into their economy. Amazon very much so, their placement formula for search results rewards price, warehousing (internal or external to Amazon), speed of previous deliveries, Amazon margins, volume, etc. It is very hard for Aussie suppliers to trump local suppliers on those metrics.

    Amazon represents something like 47% of all online sales in the USA. We can sign all the trade deals we like, but this large private company is unregulated (as you would expect a private company to be). As Aussies if we keep choosing an Amazon product because it is $5 cheaper we cant be too surprised if our neighbour becomes unemployed and starts purloining our grocery deliveries. I sound like a commie but extreme social inequality isn't that great. I have friends in Brazil with full time armed guards, not really how I would like to live.
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    Only did a purchase once at Amazon.
    not because it is more expensive, Just not use to the platform.

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    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    My policy is to do my research on the net and see if I can get any given product from a local 'Bricks & Mortar' store.
    If no go, then I look for an Australian-based outfit, regardless of where in Australia it is located.
    Still no go, I will reluctantly order from outside Australia on sites like Amazon.
    I avoid anything with a Chinese brand name although I realise that most of the stuff on the net is made there anyhow.
    I recently tried to find a 'fancy waistcoat' on-line. There was plenty of stuff made in China and advertised by off-shore vendors (usually Hong-Kong) but I eventually found an item on the 'Marks & Spencer' Australia, site.
    The measurements actually made sense (none of the O/S vendors measurements made sense) but their description unfortunately did not indicate whether the hip-pockets were functional or not. After several emails via a very poor 'Contact' facility, they told me they didn't know because the item is manufactured God-knows-where (probably China) but would try to find out and update the description of the item on their website (still not done).
    So you can try to do the right thing and still end up banging your head against a wall.
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    I have used Amazon in the past both for new items (not available in Australia at the time) such as Amazon Kindles. Was also using their marketplace again from the US when second hand items couldn't be sourced in Australia. But yeah their Australian offering is dismal both in terms of value and the marketplace is like eBay but worse.

    There are similar stories around about Aldi, cheap groceries low cost operation with a big disconnect (and level of treatment) between the corporate store/area managers and the on the ground staff and delivery drivers.

    Most of these big corporations are shafting someone to make a profit. The Australian market is tough for big corporate's due to our relatively high minimum wage, high business tax rates and low economies of scale. Not saying the treatment of workers is OK but it is a reflection of the growth in the casual labour force and our fake low unemployment rates. The unemployment rates are low as employed "includes people who are in a paid job for one hour or more in a week" (https://www.rba.gov.au/education/res...and-types.html). More and more workers are employed on a casual basis with less rights and security. But I think this is a sign of the fact the economy is terrible and both sides of government have not delivered anything (in terms of reform or macro level) outside the resources sector (which flows up and down at China's whim) to stimulate economic growth or improve our economy.

  20. #20
    OCD
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    Totally agree with buying Australian goods when practicable. However, seeing as
    Australia doesn't manufacture much of anything these days, that can be problematic.

    Ps below is a picture of me doing my bit.

    image_from_15_Nov._2019.jpg

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    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    My policy is to do my research on the net and see if I can get any given product from a local 'Bricks & Mortar' store.
    If no go, then I look for an Australian-based outfit, regardless of where in Australia it is located.
    Still no go, I will reluctantly order from outside Australia on sites like Amazon.
    Agree with the sentiment but unfortunately the Australian consumer is increasingly being treated like a mug. How many times I've heard that a retailer's local pricing is based on the comparable cost of buying overseas plus the domestic shipping costs. The profiteering that goes on here in some sectors is staggering. The point is we should be paying a comparable cost for the goods themselves without adding costly individual domestic shipping costs. Distributors both overseas and locally buy and pay for shipping in bulk to fill their warehouses before shipping locally to retailers.

    As an example, I recently bought a genuine heating element for half the price of what the local suppliers were asking and that included shipping and GST from the UK! One well known spare part retailer wanted 3 times the price I paid. By the way, the one I received was identical to the original one in the machine and included a gasket which the local retailers didn't.
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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCD View Post
    Totally agree with buying Australian goods when practicable. However, seeing as
    Australia doesn't manufacture much of anything these days, that can be problematic.
    Even the food on our supermarket shelves has to be examined closely , particularly when loudly claiming it's Australian, somewhere hidden in tiny print will be something telling us that the stuff contains at least 10% Australian fruit or similar, recently bought a kg of whole prawns, the package loudly proclaimed Australian Prawns, on closer inspection when we arrived home we discover that yes they are Australian, packaged in Thailand.

    "Imported pork makes up around 75 per cent of the processed pork sector." chances are the ham you will buy this Christmas is imported, same for bacon and pork ribs.

    We import American oranges while our producers let fruit rot on the trees because of low prices.

    The list of unnecessary food imports is endless.

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    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    King OCD Canute. He failed, and so will we.

    The more developed countries climb up the economic ladder, the less reliant they become on primary and secondary industries. They farm less and less, and make less and less goods as they gravitate into the tertiary services sector. The USA and Australia are very similar there.

    The services industry is where by far most of the economic activity resides, and in Australia's case education and travel have that sector wrapped up.

    We have a mining industry which brings home the bacon as an export earner, and a services industry too -- but nothing in between,no secondary manufacturing.

    The harsh reality is there is very little made in Australia to buy.

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    Senior Member noonar's Avatar
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    This theory explains how... we are all set up for one, or maybe a few "some", "reason/s" (barring drastic intervention). Nothing political, I enjoyed the science.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...ty-inevitable/

    :-)
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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeLotta View Post
    As an example, I recently bought a genuine heating element for half the price of what the local suppliers were asking and that included shipping and GST from the UK! One well known spare part retailer wanted 3 times the price I paid. By the way, the one I received was identical to the original one in the machine and included a gasket which the local retailers didn't.
    Yeah I've found exactly the same thing. I needed some spares for my La Pavoni and I could get them from UK for so much cheaper (including GST + shipping). I really want to support the local shops (I'd certainly be ok with paying a bit more locally) but it's hard to justify when there's that much price difference. Interestingly in the bicycle market this used to be the case too, though some retailers here have some how figured out how to get local pricing down enough (in certain areas) that it's often worth popping in to the local bike shop rather than shopping online which is great.

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    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    We import American oranges while our producers let fruit rot on the trees because of low prices.
    No, we import American oranges when Australian navels are out of season, conversely we export oranges when the Northern hemisphere is out of season. This is known as countercyclical trade and Australia is a net beneficiary because the northern hemisphere markets are so large: we export a bit more than ten times as much as we import (215,000 T export vs 20,000 T import according to USDA 2018 report figures)

    Yes, the cheap supermarket orange "juice" product is based on reconstituted frozen concentrate from Brazil, the total quantity of which (~30,000 T) is roughly equal to the import / export gap as above (assuming concentrate at 72oBx and oranges at 12 oBx) but the juice market is declining as people realise how much unnecessary sugar orange juice represents. In turn this means the returns to growers on juicing varieties (eg Valencia) are much lower than for fresh varieties (eg Navel) but the response has been largely to replant with new varieties rather than letting fruit rot.

    Riffing off an annoying old ad: if your dad grows the fruit that goes to Cottees to make the cordial that you like best, then your dad is Brazilian.
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  27. #27
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    And it's so good we import cherries...from California...during our late winter. And they are often cheaper, and often better, than our locally grown ones starting up now. There's no competition because cherries are seasonal.

  28. #28
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Our local supermarkets have been selling American oranges over the past few months whilst fresh oranges are in abundance right here in Oz, including on our own tree.

    The interesting thing is we have noticed quality Australian Washington naval oranges in supermarkets in the US, far superior to anything on offer here in Australia, seems we get Valencia juice oranges here, guess we export the high grade stuff and flog off the rubbish to the poor old Aussie consumer.

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    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noonar View Post
    This theory explains how.
    That article should be compulsory reading. Anyone who doesn't understand the maths should go back to school until they do.
    Last edited by Lyrebird; 15th November 2019 at 11:04 AM.

  30. #30
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Our local supermarkets have been selling American oranges over the past few months whilst fresh oranges are in abundance right here in Oz, including on our own tree.
    That is a single observation; in the post to which I was responding, you made a general statement which has been shown to be untrue.

    The plural of anecdote is not data.



    BTW since the vast majority of American oranges imported are navels and they are just coming into season now, I think even your observation is a bit suspect.
    Last edited by Lyrebird; 15th November 2019 at 12:21 PM.
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  31. #31
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Not worth the effort of disputing.

  32. #32
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    As fruit consumers we have made a rod for our own back: the miserable practice that a speck on an apple banana or pear deems it worthy only for the cannery or rubbish tip.

    That every piece of fruit in a supermarket has to be exactly the same size....let's look at this size thing a little closer.

    Once upon a time customers did not pick and weigh fruit...the storekeeper did. You got big, small, good and sometimes the bad depending on where you shopped.

    Fruit was also dead cheap.

    Some years ago, my cousins who grow cherries...had to invest in a gigantic grader. Half a million $.

    Now, that grader isn't big enough...so they've had to buy an even larger, more gigantic one ( these things are loooong). Of course in addition to the expense of the new grader, came the cost of a new super-sized shed to house it.

    The net result is we pay in excess of $15 a kg for this fruit, up to $30 for the most eye-catching.

    And now that it's picking time....a heavy flooding downpour will ruin the crop (the cherries swell and burst and they are left to rot on the trees). And all that investment for nought for this season.

    The irony is that by far the best, sweetest, tastiest cheeries I ever had were ones which had been allowed to ripen to their full potential on the tree after a rain. Pickers would have chaged $3 a kg to pick them...but for what? No-one would buy them.
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  33. #33
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyrebird View Post
    that is a single observation; in the post to which i was responding, you made a general statement which has been shown to be untrue.

    The plural of anecdote is not data.


    ffs.............
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    That article is a mind blower, really cool! Makes you realize why you pay taxes and you can justify providing medicare and unemployment payments. The slight problem I see with the model is the super rich actors both individuals and companies don't pay any tax. I am firmly on the side of cutting taxes for high income earners and companies, as the super rich will spend less money on lawyers and accountants avoiding tax and moving funds or profits offshore. This will result in more actual tax paid and benefit everyone one in the economy by having a trickle down effect.

    One the positive side I have also seen some amazing delivery times from Amazon. Ordered Friday delivered Monday with FedEx Express, to have something delivered as fast as I could get something delivered locally even with next day delivery is astounding. Although the rates for FexEx are pretty savage.

  35. #35
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post

    Riffing off an annoying old ad: if your dad grows the fruit that goes to Cottees to make the cordial that you like best, then your dad is Brazilian.
    Yeh, but how would you know that if your tastebuds weren't on the top of your tongue?

  36. #36
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    rooster, I agree with you that many businesses do not pay any or a fair rate of tax.
    If they don't pay tax already, I fail to see how reducing the tax rates will cause them to pay more.
    My experience with human nature is that if people can avoid tax, they will, regardless of income.
    I am a sceptic regarding the so-called "trickle-down effect". Trickle down into CEO salaries, Director's Fees and share dividends maybe.
    What we need is more energetic ATO enforcement of sanctions for companies that move their profits off-shore.
    (and restrictions of CEO salaries - I saw in the financial news last night that the stated salary of the new BHP CEO is $1.7M but his total package is $11.2M. Seriously - what a rort.)
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  37. #37
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    .
    (and restrictions of CEO salaries - I saw in the financial news last night that the stated salary of the new BHP CEO is $1.7M but his total package is $11.2M. Seriously - what a rort.)
    The pay of the ceo of that huge mining company is peanuts compared to Qantas ceo Alan Joyce's $24 million.

    We could also discuss so-called A-lister film stars getting $40 million per picture plus a percentage of revenue for a few weeks "work". Or hip hop "artists" whose only "talent" is throwing together angry words that rhyme making millions or billions.

  38. #38
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    Robusto, I think 'entertainers' - movie stars, performers, sports stars etc, are in a different category from CEOs who are corporate servants answerable (supposedly) to the shareholder and appointed by the company board.
    If you own the company, you can pay yourself what you wish but I think corporate salaries have got out of control due to complicit Boards who perhaps are involved in a mutually beneficial arrangement in regard to remuneration.

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    Rocky - One of the principle of free markets in economics is that the money will flow to cheaper tax areas and to countries who offer subsidies. The people who win with Australian high taxes are a) accountants b) lawyers many of whom later become politicians. Have a look at this article https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-...22?pfmredir=sm it is like cracking down on drugs, never has worked, never will work. The problem is the lawyers and accountants working for large multi-nationals are better and smarter on average and will be a step ahead of compliance and regulatory/tax changes. I can see two ways where companies pay more tax 1) lower tax rates (to the lower end of company tax rates world-wide) so that it becomes not worth off shoring or redirecting funds 2) A global tax agreement which eliminates tax haven's and standardizes taxes in the global market.

    Robusto - Again I don't agree on capping executive salaries as we will end up with bottom of the barrel executives running Australian companies. This will mean top level executive talent leaving to overseas markets where they can get paid for their skills. In a free market economy the companies will pay market value for their executives. Having a look at this article though https://www.smh.com.au/business/comp...16-p5319d.html I would say that Qantas are paying overmarket and Joyce's salary is well above salaries for our big 4 banks. The previous CEO was earning around 4 million per annum and doing better than Joyce.

  40. #40
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    Rooster, I don't share your belief that paying 'less than (global) market rates for salaries will produce a 'brain-drain' in Australia.
    If you look at our spectacularly well-paid CEOs over the last 30 years or so you will see that most of them were nothing special and whether they produced success for their companies was more due to wider global conditions than any individual talent. (They were often best at giving staff the high-jump to improve the short-term bottom-line))
    I have never subscribed to the belief that exorbitant salaries buy you a genius. Real life just isn't like that. You see it on a micro-level in all organisations. I worked for a lot of organisations where the top people were just duds whose ruthlessness and ambition propelled them to the top jobs. In my working life I saw very few really talented leaders and the few I saw were usually quickly sidelined by the ruthlessly ambitious further up the food chain.
    Dimal and magnafunk like this.

  41. #41
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    Australian politicians are among the most highest paid politicians in the world... sadly they are among the the most useless too.
    Dimal likes this.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erimus View Post
    Australian politicians are among the most highest paid politicians in the world... sadly they are among the the most useless too.
    The current batch are, busily trying to not deal with the drought, water issues and climate change. Nice job.
    chippy likes this.

  43. #43
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Trickle down economics doesn't work as the last 30+ years in the US has proven. The rich take everything given and continue to demand more.


    Java "Greed rules" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  44. #44
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    Trumped up...trickle down. Tax cuts for the rich here and in the U.S..

  45. #45
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    Trickle down economics doesn't work as the last 30+ years in the US has proven. The rich take everything given and continue to demand more.


    Java "Greed rules" phile
    That's dead right. It can work for a short time in developing economies, but that's about it. There's a market for excuses for people to feather their own nest while purporting to do so in the national interest.

  46. #46
    Senior Member noonar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    people to feather their own nest while purporting to do so in the national interest.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-...harge/11707556

  47. #47
    OCD
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    I recall an American survey asking 'Do you think America should legislate to restrict individual wealth?' The majority answer was a surprising, 'No.'
    It seems that any such restrictions would suppress the aspirations of the poor to becoming mega wealthy themselves.

    Ps don't like our chances for change. At least, not for the better.

  48. #48
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Whilst the proletariat continue to beg for hand outs and contribute bugger all.
    Marx.jpg

  49. #49
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    While the bourgeoisie continue to get hand outs and tax breaks with their key contribution being the accumulation of wealth (with the only hope being that the following generations squander it so that it re-enters the economy)…
    http://www.michaelwest.com.au/top-40-tax-dodgers-2019/
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  50. #50
    Senior Member Erimus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Whilst the proletariat continue to beg for hand outs and contribute bugger all.
    Marx.jpg

    What point are you trying to make in this thread?



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