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Thread: Fry your vocals

  1. #1
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
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    Fry your vocals

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I noticed years ago that some girls in their late teens, early twenties, developed an annoying (to me) habit of using upward inflexions at the end of their sentences, which turned their statement into an interrogatory.

    And equally annoying (to me) was the way words slipped down from their lips to somewhere down their throats to emerge as a lazy guttural sound.

    Was it something common to certain people only, an unfortunate speech impediment perhaps? I wasn't sure.

    But there was no mistaking a third affliction to the spoken language.

    "And I was, like...". The dreaded unnecessary and misuse of the word "like".

    What I didn't know was that these affectations have a name, and even a possible origin.

    Speaking from the throat is "verbal fry". Here is a funny example:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5VW5FMblho

    Apparently Kim Kardashian fries her vocals. I say no more.

    For more on all this, wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valleyspeak

    I know language is flexible and ever evolving...but do we have to follow trends brought about by the superficial, the vacuous and the ignorant?

    Should we all be writing " My friends took me to meet there parents" or "I saw many car's in the showroom"...

    But that's a whole other topic!
    Dimal, fg1972, Yelta and 1 others like this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sullo's Avatar
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    you know like this is like so true you know like ummm
    valley girl speech

  3. #3
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robusto View Post
    I noticed years ago that some girls in their late teens, early twenties, developed an annoying (to me) habit of using upward inflexions at the end of their sentences, which turned their statement into an interrogatory.

    And equally annoying (to me) was the way words slipped down from their lips to somewhere down their throats to emerge as a lazy guttural sound.

    Was it something common to certain people only, an unfortunate speech impediment perhaps? I wasn't sure.

    But there was no mistaking a third affliction to the spoken language.

    "And I was, like...". The dreaded unnecessary and misuse of the word "like".

    What I didn't know was that these affectations have a name, and even a possible origin.

    Speaking from the throat is "verbal fry". Here is a funny example:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5VW5FMblho

    Apparently Kim Kardashian fries her vocals. I say no more.

    For more on all this, wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valleyspeak

    I know language is flexible and ever evolving...but do we have to follow trends brought about by the superficial, the vacuous and the ignorant?

    Should we all be writing " My friends took me to meet there parents" or "I saw many car's in the showroom"...

    But that's a whole other topic!
    Don't get me started.

    Guess its a generational thing, each developing batch of youngsters would love you to believe they have reinvented or at least heavily modified the English language for the better.

    Perhaps they have, who knows?

    Another trend that gets up my nose is mispronouncing T's as D's, hear it constantly from people who should know better, i.e. metal becomes medal, bitter becomes bidder, news readers are notorious.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    The one that I find equally annoying is the trend to start a response (or even a statement) with "So".
    A redundant word. Eliminating it does not change the meaning of the sentence at all.
    I have observed that it is most prevalent in the speech of well educated people - think talk-show panel participants.
    These 'trendy' speech characteristics are often typical of big organisations - universities, big business, public service, where they go through the organisation like wildfire.
    Other examples are "moving forward", "think outside the box" etc.
    "Like" is in a different category, used mostly by younger females with maybe a bit of a bogan connotation.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sullo's Avatar
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    glad the buzzword synergy and strategic thinking have filtered off!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    The Federal Public Service used to be a shocker for those sort of buzz-words.
    Some big wheel from Canberra would fly in, having been to a conference somewhere else and drop all the latest ones.
    (I could often recognise them from some current Management Text that was in-vogue at the time - "In Search of Excellence" by Waterman & Peters was an example.)
    Next thing the local sycophants would be peppering their speech with them whilst the staff rolled their eyes.
    Of course buzz-words are different from meaningless utterances such as "like" and "so" which have no purpose other than to advertise how bereft of individuality their sponsors are.

  7. #7
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Yep, "World's best practice." is another good one oft quoted but totally meaningless without qualification and substantiation...

    Mal.
    fg1972 and flynnaus like this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    'trendy' speech characteristics are often typical of big organisations - universities, big business, public service, where they go through the organisation like wildfire.
    Other examples are "moving forward", "think outside the box" etc.
    ^safety officers and middle/upper management.
    I call these 'wank words'.. generally used by wankers.
    IrisGanache likes this.

  9. #9
    Senior Member CoffeeHack's Avatar
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    'Fry' is a technical term used to describe different vocal registers (e.g. falsetto). It's interesting how humans develop different accents & vocalisations based on their peer-groups and other influences, typically during the teen years I understand. Even the different way people of different accents say 'ummm' based on what becomes the natural way to position their mouth for various accents e.g. people with a Scottish accent will say 'erhm' instead.

    tldr; yep, that's an annoying accent!

  10. #10
    Coffee Nut fg1972's Avatar
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    I watch a bit of DIY videos on YouTube and what noticeably stands out usually from people in the US is the unnecessary use of the phrase "go ahead".
    "I'm like gonna go ahead and apply some paint", "I'll just go ahead and take this off", "Now I'll go ahead and open this up"
    Sometimes when they are really serious about going ahead, it's "I'm gonna go right ahead and ....."



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