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Thread: Linux speleology

  1. #1
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Linux speleology

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Speleomike boasts:

    Silvia with PID, Rocky doserless & Gene Cafe, Linux enthusiast & Caver.

    Gee I know Linux has some hidden depths, but does it really require speleological skills? ;D

    Ive made a return to Linux after a brief flirt with Redhat 7/8 a few years ago. Have tried Mandriva and just installed Ubuntu. I would say that Ubuntu is probably the most user friendly distro Ive tried. Windows users wondering what the fuss is about, this is a good opportunity to see (and its completely free)

    What distro do you use? Im guessing as an enthusiast you are more likely to be a slackware man

    Steve

  2. #2
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Gday flynnaus,

    Currently using Kubuntu 8.04 with the latest Linux core files. Tried both Ubuntu and Kubuntu some time ago (as well as several other distros) but found that Kubuntu suits the way I like to do things so have pretty well stuck to it now. Still keep an eye on various other distros to make sure Im not falling behind in any area but nothing else really screams out at me at this stage.

    Like you say, (K)Ubuntu is a very mature package these days and is truly very easy for any long-time user of Windows to come to grips with quite quickly. I think Billy should be worried ;)

    Mal.

  3. #3
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    If I understand correctly, Ubuntu uses Gnome while Kubuntu uses KDE.
    I like the configurability of KDE. Ill give Kubuntu a try. Ill have to as Ive messed up my partitions a bit and I have a few too many now.

    Mandriva is OK - I was attracted because Mandrake was the leading distro a few years back.

    I think Linux has a little way to go in the user friendliness stakes to catch up with Windows but it certainly isnt far behind.

    Steve



    Steve

  4. #4
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    Re: Linux speleology

    From where i sit as an IT Manager of a corporate windows environment of 300+ users, i dont see Billy in any trouble in the short term. The effort required to move staff away from MS would never get the project off the ground, retraining would never be completed and our user base is sometimes not that intelligent (being very kind here) ;)

    Just trying to roll out new timesheet, job creation and simple business intelligence applications is hard work.

    Now if i was building a new network from a green field site then that would be an entirely different matter, you wouldnt need to see Billy at all with all the other retail and open source options available.

    In the long term Billy i think will have issues especially when you consider our state of the art virtualisation software runs with a linux kernel at heart.

    Mal

  5. #5
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Well Billy isnt working at "MonopolySoft" anymore and I think he already has enough money to last through any rainy day what so ever (though sadly not likely).

    Anyhoo Im currently using the distro supplied with the Asus EEE (a modified version of Xandros) I find that this gives me complete functionality and I dont have the need (currently) to put on a different distro. People have been known to install other distros and even Windows :-/ .

    I use my EEE as my complete development platform (mainly Python and Java) and as a mobile web browser (pretty much what is was designed for). I do however need to look at a larger battery (6 or 8 cell - I currently have a four) as it never seems to last quite long enough for one outing (Although the new models with the larger 8.9 inch screen and larger on board flash do seem appealing ::) ).


  6. #6
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Whoever pulls the strings at M$, they arent going to be happy with losing any market share - all 90 or so % of it. After seeing off Jobs and co, they have been trying to put the frighteners into anyone considering venturing into open-source.
    But M$ is becoming too unwieldy and resource hungry and this is where Linux has some edge (other than in the cost stakes)

  7. #7
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    Re: Linux speleology

    When my win2k box died I ran up an old Bondi Blue Imac i had in the Garage, it went back out to the Garage Xmas when I got a G4 10.4.11 running, The Old Dell Notebook has XP Pro and Xubuntu Hardy on it, and i am putting Fedora 9 on a USB Stick. I eagerly await the release of Haiku a BeOS Clone. Call me a sucker for punishment.

  8. #8
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Im encouraging the office to purchase a number of the EEE PC models that will be released later in the year with the Atom.

    I think that by introducing linux to the executive in a non-threatening way they may be more open to toy with open source.

    We shall see.

  9. #9
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Hmm maybe I will put off upgrading my EEE till the 10 inch Atom is available.

    Theres nothing wrong with wanting to upgrade to the latest and greatest bottom end is there right.... right? ::)

  10. #10
    Senior Member speleomike's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Hi all

    Looking over the topic list tonight something caught my eye - "Linux speleology" !!!!

    Ok, flynnaus wanted to know what distro I used. Sorry you guessed wrong but not too far away - Debian :-) Its a great distro and I like huge community that it supports. My wife uses Linux, Solaris, Redhat and a bit of Bill at work as she is an electrical engineer turned system admin. Both of us go to SLUG meetings a lot http://www.slug.org.au and we have been to nearly all the Aust Linux conferences including the first one ever in Aust.

    Both of us go caving with SUSS http://www.ee.usyd.edu.au/suss/
    (You might remember the rescue a few weeks ago, we were involved in that for some days, I really needed quite a few coffees.) Mainly we do surveying and mapping of caves, including unexplored ones.
    http://www.speleonics.com.au/mikes
    http://www.speleonics.com.au/jills

    And now with Coffee Snobs this site is a major interest. Its also a great community.

    Mike



  11. #11
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Quote Originally Posted by speleomike link=1213583842/0#9 date=1213624727

    Ok, flynnaus wanted to know what distro I used. Sorry you guessed wrong but not too far away - Debian :-) Its a great distro and I like huge community that it supports.
    Ah, Debian. That would have been my next guess. When I was hunting around for what distro to try out, Linux snobs were hinting that Ubuntu is for noobs (fair enough) but if you arent working from a terminal window then you may as well admit you drink instant coffee as well (well they didnt really say that but that was the inference). Serious Linux enthusiasts were slackware die-hards. Ubuntu is shaping up to be a strong contender for Windows killer for the home user at least.

    Its impossible to escape from Bill. That would be some challenge - use a different PC every day, not including one of your own, that isnt a Windows PC. I wouldnt last a day - my work PC has Win XP.

    Caving is fascinating but I get claustrophobia just watching it. I cant believe an experienced caver with a medical condition would decide to go off by himself (depending on what is reported in the press is accurate, that is)

    Steve

  12. #12
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Quote Originally Posted by TEPIN link=1213583842/0#6 date=1213615905
    I eagerly await the release of Haiku a BeOS Clone.
    BeOS - now theres a name from the past. I wonder if anyone still runs OS/2?

  13. #13
    Senior Member speleomike's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Hi all

    > Linux snobs were hinting that Ubuntu is for noobs (fair enough) but if
    > you arent working from a terminal window then you may as well admit
    > you drink instant coffee as well

    So what Linux distros correspond to what coffee machines?
    Ill put my hat and and say that whoever runs Gentoo, where you have to compile everything from scratch to even start, also probably has a La Pavoni Lever machine :-) I had a laugh

    It prob goes something like this ... but I can adjust compiler switches to get 3% more speed out of my application ... but I can adjust all the variables in making the coffee myself :-)

    Mike

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    Re: Linux speleology

    Quote Originally Posted by speleomike link=1213583842/0#12 date=1213662589
    Ill put my hat and and say that whoever runs Gentoo, where you have to compile everything from scratch to even start, also probably has a La Pavoni Lever machine :-) I had a laugh

    Mike
    Yep, and you probably telnet to make your connection, use Lynx as your web browser (The Coffeesnobs site must look shocking ::)), Ftp to get downloads etc.....

    Whilst living in the past is interesting (Corning ware stove top percolated coffee anyone???) - most of us move with the times and embrace enhancements.......

    There is no doubt in my mind that Ubuntu (and its variants) are the best current operating systems...... so they are the Synessos/FB80s of the espresso world.....

    And if you insist on getting your hands dirty compiling applications (or even cutting code)..... you can with (X)buntu..... join the developers group!

    After all, the fact you have an automatic machine doesnt prevent you from extracting the best shots manually when you wish, and using the automation when necessary!!! ;) ;)



  15. #15
    Wine_of_the_Bean
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    Re: Linux speleology

    But...what about games?

  16. #16
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Linux speleology

    Plenty of free games available for Linux. Some of the more popular games such as World of Warcraft have been ported for Linux although I dont know how well these work.

  17. #17
    cremakid
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    Re: Linux speleology

    I believe there is a new distro coming out, "Xnobbix"!



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